Hulley Family History >> Family Trees >> Cheshire > Jasper Howley

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Ches03 - Descendants of Jasper Howley who was born at Hurdesfield in 1667

Notes


163. John Hulley

FULL DETAILS OF THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JOHN HULLEY ARE SHOWN AT

http://www.johnhulley-olympics.co.uk

1832 19 Feb - born at Liverpool - see 1861 census below and Chancery case ref C 15/204/H136- Bill of Complaint
Page 3 item 4.

1832 19 Jul - baptised at St. David church Brownlow Hill, Liverpool: John son of John Nevitte and Elizabeth Hulley,
Gloucester Street Liverpool, by the Revd Robt. Davies, Minister.

1841 census
HO 107/558/8 f21r Liverpool Gloucester St
Mrs. Hulley 30 Indt. N
Mrs. Speed 40 Indt. Y
Miss Nevitt 70 Indt. Y
Mrs. Pearson 80 Indt. N
Harriett Knight 17 F.S. N
John Hulley 9 Y
David McClune 29 Surgeon S

Note: on 1841 census above: Mrs Speed could be a sister-in-law of Elizabeth Hulley nee Speed; Miss
Nevitt could be an aunt of John Nevitt Hulley husband of Elizabeth who died in 1840.

c1845-50 - taught Physical Education by Louis Huguenin. (source: The Liverpool Citizen Feb 25 1888 p7)

c1850 - matriculated form the Collegiate Institute, Shaw Street Liverpool. (source: The Liverpool Citizen Feb 25
1888 p7)

1851 census
HO 107/2193 f296r, 297 Huyton Brook House Farm
Hugh Speed Head W 58 Wholesale Butcher & Farmer of 134 acres empl 11 Labs Flint Overton
David Speed Brother U 63 Farmer's Assistant Flint Overton
Jane Rigby S-in-L U 28 House Keeper Lancs Ditton
John Hulley Neph U 19 Visitor Lancs Liverpool
Sarah Hulley Neice 16 Visitor Lancs Liverpool
Lydia Barker Visitor M 47 Visitor Lancs Liverpool
Barbary Burger Visitor U 24 W.I. Valpariaso (Brit Sub)
Ellen Fleetwood Serv U 22 House Servant Ches Northwich
Mary Fleetwood Serv 17 House Servant Ches Northwich
James Clark Serv 21 House Servant Scotland
George Parkinson Serv 11 House Servant Lancs Liverpool

Note: the surname is shown as HAULLEY in the ancestry.co.uk index

1855 27 Sep - Co-defendant (with Charles Rowe Cheshire) in Chancery case concerning the Will of his sister Sarah
Hulley who died in 1845. Her Will is shown in her Notes section.

TNA reference C 15/204/H136

Filed 27th September 1855 Ward
John Hulley and Sarah Hulley Plaintiffs
Robert Churchman Hulley and Charles Rowe Cheshire Defendants

Interrogatories for the examination of the above named Defendants in answer to the
Plaintiffs Bill of Complaint

1. Was not Sarah Hulley at the time of her death possessed or entitled of or to considerable and what
or some and what personal Estate and of what particulars did the same consist and did she not duly
make assign and execute her last Will and Testament of such date and to such purport and effect as
the Will in the Plaintiffs Bill mentioned to bear date the Fourteenth day of September One thousand
eight hundred and forty four or some other and what will of some other and what date or to some
other and what purport and effect or how otherwise and is not the said Defendant Charles Rowe
Cheshire described in the said Will as Charles Cheshire.
2. Did not the said Testatrix die on the Twenty third day of February One thousand eight hundred and
forty four or when did she die and had she revoked or altered her said Will and did she not leave the
said Defendants and also the Plaintiffs her surviving and did not the said Defendants or either and which
of them on the Thirtieth day of August One thousand eight hundred and forty five or on some other and
what day prove the said Will in the Consistory Court at Chester or in some and what Ecclesiastical Court
and whether the same Court is not the proper Ecclesiastical Court or what was or is the proper
Ecclesiastical Court for proving the said Will of the said Testatrix.
3. Did not the said Defendants or either and which of them under and by virtue f the probate of the said
Will possess and receive the personal Estate of the said Testatrix or some or what parts thereof and
whether or not to an amount much more than sufficient to pay or some and which of the debts funeral
and testamentary expences of the said Testatrix and whether or not also all or some and which of the
Legacies given and bequeathed by her said Will.
4. Were not the Plaintiffs at the death of the said Testatrix the only children of her deceased brother
John Nevitt Hulley and were they not then of the respective ages in the Plaintiffs Bill mentioned or of
what ages were they respectively at her death Is it not the fact that the said Defendant Robert
Churchman Hulley has never been married and if he shall allege that he has ever been married let him
set forth when and where and to whom by name he was so married and whether such Wife is now living
and whether there were or was any and what Children or Child of such marriage and what were their
respective Christian names and when and where were they respectively born and whether and which of
them are or is now living and where they he or she reside or resides.
5. Did not the said Defendants or either and which of them within Twelve months after the death of the
said Testatrix or when first receive or possess themselves or himself of sufficient of her personal Estate
to invest in the public funds the Legacies of Two hundred pounds each bequeathed as in the Plaintiffs
Bill mentioned respectively and whether or not also to invest the Legacy of Five hundred pounds
bequeathed in favor of the said Defendant Robert Churchman Hulley his family and the Plaintiffs
respectively as in the Plaintiffs Bill mentioned and if the said Defendants shall not admit that they
received sufficient of such personal Estate within twelve months after the said Testatrixes decease to
invest the said three legacies in the public funds let the said Defendants respectively set forth a full and
true account of their respective receipts and payments on account of the said Testatrixes personal Estate
with the respective times when they and each of them received each and every part of the said
Testatrixes personal Estate and ought not the said Defendants or either and which of them on or
before the Twenty third day of February One thousand eight hundred and forty six or when first or
whether or not as after the said Twenty third day of February One thousand eight hundred and forty six as
they had assets in their or either of their hands sufficient of that purpose to have invested the said
Legacies of Two hundred pounds each in Three pounds per cent Bank Annuities and from time to time
during the respective minorities of the Plaintiffs to have invested and accumulated the dividends of the
sum of stock upon which the said two Legacies should have been invested Did not the said
Defendants or either and which of them neglect to invest the said two Legacies and to accumulate the
dividends and did not the said Defendants or either and which of them from time to time and when place
with the Liverpool Banking Company considerable or what or some and what sums of money which
were received by them the said Defendants or by one and which of them on account of the said
Testatrixes personal Estate and did not the said Defendants or one and which of them permit such sums
or some and which of them And to what amount to remain with the said Banking Company a
considerable or what and some and what time and from what time to what time and is it not the fact that
the said Defendant only invested the sums in the Plaintiffs Bill in that behalf mentioned that is to say the
sums of One hundred and seventy three pound and fifteen shillings Four hundred and five pounds and
One hundred and ninety nine pounds and five shillings Cash in the purchase of Bank Three pounds per
cent annuities or what sums part of the Testatrixes personal Estate did they or either of them invest in
Bank Three pounds per cent annuities and did not the said Defendants or either and which of them on or
about the twenty fifth day of May One thousand eight hundred and forty seven or when else invest the
said sum of One hundred and seventy three pound and fifteen shillings Cash or some and what sum of
Cash in the purchase in their joint names in the Books of the Governor and Company of the Bank of
England of the sum of Two hundred pounds or some and what sum Bank Three pounds per cent
annuities and did not the said Defendants or either and which of them on or about the nineteenth day of
January One thousand eight hundred and forty eight invest the further sum of Four hundred and five
pounds Cash or some ands what sum in the purchase of Four hundred and sixty four pounds three
shillings and eight pence like Annuities in joint names of the said Defendants and did not the said
Defendants or either and which of them on or about the eight day of September One thousand eight
hundred and forty eight or at some other time and when invest the further sum of One hundred and
ninety nine pounds and five shillings or some other and what sum of Cash in the purchase of Two
hundred and thirty one pounds like Annuities in their joint names and have or has the said Defendants
or either and which of them ever and when invested all or any and which of the dividends of the sums so
invested in the purchase of any and what sums or sum of stock and have not or has not the said
Defendants or either and which of them paid to the Plaintiffs or to either and which of them very shortly
and when after the Plaintiffs attained respectively their ages of Twenty one years some and what small
sums of money as and for some and which of the dividends of stock purchased on account of their said
two legacies and did the said Defendants or either and which of them ever and when inform the Plaintiffs
or either and which of them that according to the trusts of the said Testatrix said Will the dividends and
interest of their said legacies ought during their minorities to have been invested and accumulated.
6. Have not the Plaintiffs caused such applications to be made to the said defendants as mentioned in
the Eighth paragraph of the Plaintiffs Bill or applications to some such or the like and to what effect and
have not the said Defendants refused to comply with such applications were not such letters as in the
Eighth paragraph of the said Bill in that behalf mentioned respectively written and sent to and by the
persons respectively in that behalf mentioned and were not such letters respectively received by the
persons to whom the same were respectively addressed.
7. Have not the said Defendants had with each other And have not or has not they or either and which
of them had with any other persons or person and whom divers and what or some and what written and
whether or not and what communications relating to the matters in the said Bill mentioned or to some
and which of them and would not the truth of the matters in the Bill stated or some and which of them
appear from such communications and have not or has not the said Defendants or one and which of
them in their one and which of their possession or power or in the possession or power of their or either
and which of their Solicitors or Agents Solicitor or Agent divers and which or some and what deeds or
deed books or book books of account or book of account accounts or account instruments or instrument
documents or document letters or letter copies of Letters or copy of a Letter paper or paper
memorandums or memorandum writings or writing relating or containing some and what entries
relating to the matters in the Plaintiffs Bill mentioned or to some and which of them and would not the
truth of such matters or of some and which of them appear if such particulars were produced.
8. Let the said Defendants set forth a full and true list or Schedule of all and every the deed and other
particulars enquired after by the last preceding or Seventh Interrogatory distinguishing such of them as
now in their or either of their possession or power and setting forth what is become of such of them as
once were but are not now in their possession or power and when and why they parted therewith and
the material purport and effect thereof.

S. F. Piggott

The Defendants are respectively required to answer all these Interrogatories

C32 Cause Books - arranged and listed chronologically under the initial letter of plaintiffs’ names. In
them are entered the names of all parties and of their solicitors in each cause. The dates of
appearances and documents filed, together with a brief reference to any decrees and orders, reports
and certificates made by the court during the course of proceedings are similarly recorded. For
indexes see IND 1/2152-2169 and 16727- 6747.

Reference for Hulley v Hulley C 32/153 - 1855 Number 1855 H 1 - 1855 H 175.

Hulley No. 136

Parties Names Appearances Interrogatories

John Hulley and Sarah Hulley Plts. (a) 26th September 1855 For Examon. of Defts.
(b) (b) By Gregory & Co 27th September 1855
Robert Churchman Hulley & Charles Bedford Row
(a) Agents for R. Frodsham
Rowe Cheshire . . . . . Dfts of Liverpool

L.C V.C Stuart
Clarke Grey & Filed Bill 21st September 1855 (b) 28 September 1855
Woodcock By Dft in Person
20 Lincolns Inn Fields of 38 Carey Street
Middlesex Chancery Lane
Agents for Lincolns Inn
I.O. Jones
Liverpool

Note: The following columns have been left blank:

Answers, &c
Exceptions
Replications
Depositions
Orders and Consents
Certificates
Memoranda of Service

See pic 5012

NOTE:- It is assumed that the case was settled out of Court because the above columns were left blank

1855 02 Nov - The Morning Post - Law Notices - This Day - Vice-Chancellor’s Stuart’s Chambers, - Hulley v. Hulley.

1855 02 Nov - The Morning Post - Law Notices - This Day - Vice-Chancellor’s Stuart’s Chambers, - Hulley v. Hulley.

1861 24 Apr - Liverpool Daily Post - 79 TH L.V.R. ASSAULT OF ARMS AT THE THEATRE-ROYAL (THIS EVENING)
We refer our readers to an advertisement in which they will be acquainted with the details of this much
talked of and eagerly anticipated entertainment. Having already repeatedly dwelt with the interest exited
by the occasion on the arrangements made, we need only add today that the gentlemen of the
Manchester Athenaeum Gymnastic Club have kindly volunteered very valuable aid. Their perform-
-ances, and those of M. Huguenin’s Gymnasium, will give a still further variety to the programme.
The proceedings will commence with a few words from Mr. Hulley, who has most indefatigably and
judiciously shared with Mr. Brandreth the arduous labour of getting up the assault, and who, we have
no doubt, will inaugurate it with the best possible taste.
Then will commence the actual business of the evening. Bouts of single-stick, fencing, and sabre
against bayonet will be interspersed with gymnastic feats, sword dancing, cavalry sword exercises, the
Highland fling, the Lucknow march, and by what will no doubt prove the bonne bouche of the
programme, the sword feats of Corporal M’Keachie (2nd Life Guards) who will sever a bar of lead at a
single blow (a la Coeur de Lion), also a sheep and a leg of mutton. But for all this and for the subsidiary
arrangements we refer our readers to the programme, only advising all who can get in to make a point
of witnessing an entertainment at once exciting, graceful, and instructive.

1861 25 Apr - Liverpool Mercury The Assault of Arms at the Theatre-Royal
(including) Address on Physical Education by John Hulley (approx 280 lines of text) Note: Motto of the
Liverpool Athletic Club - MENS SANA IN CORPORE SANO

1861 29 Apr - Morning Post - "ASSAULT OF ARMS" AT LIVERPOOL.
One of the most novel as well as one of the most attractive of the public entertainments with which our
volunteers have appealed to the public was given at the Theatre Royal, Liverpool, on Wednesday
evening, on behalf of the 79th Lancashire Volunteer Rifles, entitled "A Grand Assault of Arms." By the
kindness of Colonel M. Martyn, of the 2nd Life Guards, several of the picked swordsmen of that regiment
were permitted to take part in the contests.
Mr Hulley, of the 79th, having opened the proceedings by delivering an address on Physical Education,"
the contests commenced. Amongst the contests was a most exciting one with single sticks between
Corporals M’Keachie and Butt, of the 2nd Life Guards, and some capital point fencing between M.
Fontaine, professor of fencing to the London Fencing Club, and Corporal shaw, of the 1st Life Guards.
There were also broadsword exercises and encounters of the sword against bayonet, both feats
displaying the greatest skill and most perfect training in the use the of different weapons. Corporal
M’Keachie performed the celebrated Coeur de Lion feat of severing a sheep and also a bar of lead with
a single blow with a broadsword. This feat was several times repeated in the most successful manner.
Several Members of the Manchester Athenaeum Gymnastic Club and of M. Huguenin’s Liverpool
Gymnasium performed a great variety of gymnastic exercises in a manner which would have done no
discredit to professional gymnasts. Captain Inglefield, R.N., having permitted a few of the picked men
from the Majestic to be present, they had several single-stick encounters, including one for a prize silver
medal, the winner of which was rapturously applauded. The entertainment also included an encounter
with boxing gloves by the members of the Manchester Gymnastic Club and other gentlemen; and this, we
may state, was one of the performances most rapturously encored. Mr J. M’Neil danced the Highland
sword-dance, and this was followed by a variety of Scotch dances by other Highlanders. The piper-
major of the 78th Highlanders played the march which he performed at the head of his regiment when
proceeding to the relief of Lucknow during the late Indian campaign, and was loudly encored.
Liverpool Mercury.

1861 census
RG 9/2741f45 Liverpool Huyton Woolfall Hall
Edward Speed Head M 64 Farmer of 90 acres Flintshire Overton
Harriett Speed Wife M 54 Ches Runcorn
Thomas Speed Son M 31 Butcher + wife 3 children Lancs Liverpool
John Hulley Visitor 28 Lancs Liverpool

1861 24 Apr - Liverpool Daily Post - 79 TH L.V.R. ASSAULT OF ARMS AT THE THEATRE-ROYAL (THIS EVENING)
We refer our readers to an advertisement in which they will be acquainted with the details of this much
talked of and eagerly anticipated entertainment. Having already repeatedly dwelt with the interest exited
by the occasion on the arrangements made, we need only add today that the gentlemen of the
Manchester Athenaeum Gymnastic Club have kindly volunteered very valuable aid. Their perform-
-ances, and those of M. Huguenin’s Gymnasium, will give a still further variety to the programme.
The proceedings will commence with a few words from Mr. Hulley, who has most indefatigably and
judiciously shared with Mr. Brandreth the arduous labour of getting up the assault, and who, we have no
doubt, will inaugurate it with the best possible taste. Then will commence the actual business of the
evening. Bouts of single-stick, fencing, and sabre against bayonet will be interspersed with gymnastic
feats, sword dancing, cavalry sword exercises, the Highland fling, the Lucknow march, and by what will
no doubt prove the bonne bouche of the programme, the sword feats of Corporal M’Keachie (2nd Life
Guards) who will sever a bar of lead at a single blow (a la Coeur de Lion), also a sheep and a leg of
mutton. But for all this and for the subsidiary arrangements we refer our readers to the programme, only
advising all who can get in to make a point of witnessing an entertainment at once exciting, graceful, and
instructive.

1861 04 Dec - Essay on Physical Education - Delivered by John Hulley Esq. of Liverpool at the Theatre Royal
Liverpool December 4th 1861 (source: Minds, Bodies and Souls - An Anthology of the Olympic
Heritage Network by Dr. Don Anthony - pps10,11)

Do we think that any one of us, whatever may be his mental merits, can allow his physical strength to
decline, can leave his bodily powers uncultivated, without becoming degraded and imperfect, and
without paying the sure penalty? Will nature spare either him or his children for neglecting the one
part of his being, whatever he may accomplish through the culture of the other? No, she demands that
an equal and impartial attention be paid to all the faculties, and that an equal interest be taken in
physical as in mental culture.
There is scarcely one of us whose physical state is what it ought to be. Poor, weak, pale, dyspeptic
beings we are, unworthy of the name of a man, whatever learning or mental attainments we may
possess. We may dazzle our fellow men by these one-sided accomplishments, we may win their short-
sighted praise, but we shall not cheat nature, nor reap ought but her punishment to us and our children.
When our day of physical affliction comes, as come it certainly will, to everyone who neglects his body,
when the retribution head is laid heavily on ourselves and on our children, then shall we feel the vanity
and delusiveness of our preference for one set of our faculties above the other.

A man who cultivates his personal appearance and takes a pride in his handsome and athletic figure is
called a coxcomb, while the puny delicate man of letters, who exalts in his mental superiority, and who
boasts of the triumph of mind over matter, is thought to have a noble and excusable pride. The attention
and reverence for physical beauty is one of the best safeguards for health and manly vigour. Beauty of
face and figure is only to be maintained and perpetuated to coming generations by exercise of our body
powers and is one of the best signs of a well-spent life. In truth the great want of physical beauty and
manly strength and elegance of frame, which is so widespread among us, is as distressing and as
deeply to be deplored, as the prevalence of moral evil, of which, in fact, it is the outward and visible
type. No qualities of mind can make up for this sinful and miserable neglect of the body. The moral
virtues themselves are to be promoted at present through the physical ones, for in the present state of
physical degradation, in which we live, it is a vanity to imagine that high moral excellence can prevail.
Therefore the earnest culture of the bodily powers by every one of us is the surest means to elevate
mankind.

We should not be contented with a low standard of physical elevation. We should make it our religious
aim, that every one of us, man, woman, and child, should possess a large, powerful frame, whose
blooming health shall set consumption and other diseases of debility, at deliverance. Each man and
woman should take as much pride, in the cultivation of the bodily as of the mental faculties, feeling
deeply that the grand truth, that the interests of our race are just as much bound up in the right
development of the ones as of the other. We should not be content until the thews and sinews, the
powerful bodied and manly minds of our ancestors become prevalent among us and are blended with
the advantage of our advanced civilisation, with our greater enlightment and refinement, and a longer
average of life, we should cultivate all those sports and manly exercises which promote bodily health
and vigour, just as sedulously as we cultivate any other branch of education, for no amount of mental
cultivation, intellect, or wealth will ever make up to a community for the lack of manly mode ability and
pluck.

History is full of examples of intellectually developed nations, but intellectual only, falling a prey to
others of inferior mental calibre, but of daring and overwhelming physique. Therefore we should have
an equal honour to physical as to mental excellence. Whenever we see it, we should learn to take an
equal pleasure in it, and to have an equal reverence for the physical and the mental sciences and to
attain to a well valued grandeur a like of the material and of the moral universe.

1861 05 Dec - Liverpool Daily Post - ASSAULT OF ARMS AT THE THEATRE ROYAL
If physical education does not become one of the lost popular pursuits it will not be for want of crowded
and enthusiastic audiences, admirable models of agility and athletic accomplishment. The remarkable
entertainment of last night was applauded to the echo throughout by a tremendous house. A glance at
our leading columns will sufficiently excuse our silence as to the details of the programme, the
arrangements of which, and its admirable working, reflecting the highest credit on Mr. Hulley, the
honorary secretary of the club, and the gentlemen who generously associated their labours with his.
Not the least noticeable incident of the evening was the reception given to the sailors of the Majestic,
which evidently had reference to recent international events, and was , indeed, a fine patriotic
demonstration. The audience began by loudly cheering the men; the band then commenced playing
“Rule Britannia,” upon which the audience simultaneously rose, and accompanied the national air
throughout with enthusiastic huzzes.

1861 05 Dec - Liverpool Mercury - Grand Assault on Arms -
The Liverpool athletic club, held an assault-at-arms at the Theatre Royal, Williamson Square last
evening. (including) After an interesting address on the importance of physical education by Mr John
Hulley, the honorary secretary, the programme was proceeded with.

1862 24 May - Liverpool Daily Post - THE APPROACHING OLYMPIC FESTIVAL -
The Greeks of old, on celebrating the great Olympic games, sacrificed to the gods: the Liverpool Athletic
Club, in doing the same thing at the present day, act with more practical wisdom; they leave the gods
specially to conduct matters celestial, and by unremitting personal exertion, through their honorary
secretary, Mr. John Hulley, are making preparations to render the great coming festival to be holden on
the Mount Vernon Parade Ground, on the 4th proximo, worthy of a red-letter place in the annals of the
town .The most influential patronage is, Unsought, being extended to the occasion. His Worship the
Mayor not only countenances the proceedings, but aids them by giving the principal prize - “The
Champion Medal.” The medal is of gold, of beautiful workmanship, in the form of a Maltese Cross. In
the centre is a figure of Hercules, surrounded, in gold letters on a white enamelled ribbon, by the
motto of the club, - “Mens Sana in Corpore Sano,“ and round that again is a wreath of laurels in green
enamel. This prize is to be awarded to the most successful competitor in the day’s games. The ground
will shortly be put into preparation, tenders are being advertised for the erection of a grandstand,
dressing tents for the competitors, supplying the refreshment department, for flags, trophies, &c. for
decorating the field; and there can be no doubt that the festival will prove a grand success. Mr. C. P.
Melly, who has been elected president of the club, will preside and distribute the prizes.

1862 12 Jun - Liverpool Mercury - The Grand Olympic Festival -
List of Entries (including), Sabre versus Bayonet - First Prize a Silver Medal; Second Prize a Bronze
Medal, J. Hulley Gymnastics - By members of the Liverpool Athletic Club (including), J. Hulley.

1862 14 Jun - Liverpool Mercury - Grand Olympic Festival -
held at Mount Vernon Parade Ground Liverpool - organised by the Liverpool Athletic Club - John Hulley
Honorary Secretary. 10,000 spectators in attendance.

1862 16 Jun - Liverpool Mercury - The Grand Olympic Festival -
(including) Mr Melly, addressing the company assembled in front of the grand stand. When the last
prize was presented, said before they left the ground he thought it was his duty to tell them through
whose exertions that delightful afternoon’s amusement had been afforded to them. They were indebted
for it to Mr John Hulley, the excellent honorary secretary of the club, and it was entirely owing to his
indefatigable and praiseworthy exertions that the festival had been brought to such a successful and
highly satisfactory issue. Mr Melly then called for three cheers for Mr Hulley, which were given right
heartedly, with "one cheer more."

1862 16 Jun - Liverpol Mercury - Account of the Grand Olympic Festival -
Incl. "The comittee of management, aided by the indefatigable honorary secretary of the club, Mr. John
Hulley, were naturally desirous that the festival should pass off with all possible eclat, and accordingly
used their utmost exertions to that end." "It is due to Mr. John Hulley to state that the whole direction and
management of the festival devolved upon him. He was unrimitting in his exertions throughout the day,
and there is no doubt that to his Courtesy and zeal the successful issue of the undertaking was mainly
attributed."

1862 29 Sep - Liverpool Mercury (Advert)
The Rotunda Gymnasium, Bold Street, will open on Monday next, the 6th of October. For further
information, apply at the Gymnasium. John Hulley, Director.

1862 17 Oct - Liverpool Daily Post - THE ROTUNDA GYMNASIUM -
The old Rotunda building in Bold-street has been converted into an institution which both challenges the
public attention by its novelty and demands public patronage by its excellence. Physical education has
its way to make in England, where it is grievously neglected; but its way will be rapidly made, we may
well hope, if such complete and admirable organisation as we find here is employed to bring it into
vogue. The Rotunda has been completely rehabilitated. Decorations of great taste have been carried
out by Messrs. Davis and Nicholl of Brownlow-hill, so that the interior has a decidedly attractive
appearance, while the completeness of the arrangements avoids that unpleasant discrepancy between
the show and the reality, which is too often noticeable in public institution of this and other kinds. Most
people have a sufficiently accurate picture of the ordinary appurtenances of a gymnasium, and the
general aspect of the Rotunda does not differ, except in the superior neatness and finish of these
appurtenances, from any other institution of the kind; but, on a close inspection there is much more to
notice than this general glance suggests.
The great room is surrounded by more ingenious and elaborate appliances, an elucidation of which by
the able and enthusiastic director and part proprietor, Mr. Hulley, gives no little insight into the
rudiments of physical education, and suggests a world of ideas as to the operations and capabilities of
the various muscles which are never likely to occur to anyone in the ordinary routine of town existence.
Some of the apparatus are very ingenious indeed, and Mr. Hulley is thoroughly equal to the task of
explaining their salutary effects and inciting their use. In this large circular room, or hall, the prin-
-cipal operations of the institution will be carried on; but there are other important apartments, all of
which are fitted up with remarkable taste. There is a school of arms, where Mr. Winterbottom - who
comes from celebrated stock - will be the professor of swordsmanship; Sergeant-Major Hannah will
teach singlestick and drill; and Mr. James Wynes will undertake instruction in boxing. In the school of
arms will be kept the registers of the institution, which will be so kept as to chronicle to some extent the
physical development which Mr. Hulley confidently prophesies for all regular practisers.
There is also a handsome dressing room and a sufficiently commodious bath. Everything seems to
have been thought of that could render such a place more likely to attract, and more likely to benefit
those whom it attracts. It should be remembered especially that while there is all scope for feats of
strength and agility, the graduations of exercise are so beautifully arranged, that under the highly
competent direction of Mr. Hulley, who is personally in attendance every day from nine in the morning,
there can be no risk of pursuing athletic pleasures in an imprudent manner. To make the building a sort
of temple to the athletic cult, the central pillar has been constructed so as to serve for inscriptions of the
names of those successful in athletic contests. The institution is an admirable one, which may be used
little, or much, if only used regularly, with great advantage to all; and those who frequent it will always
have the advantage of the best information, sure guidance, and the satisfaction of knowing that the
management is of a spirited and thorough kind, and that anything that can be done to render it more
perfect will be adopted as soon as shown to be desirable and practicable.

1863 21 Feb - Liverpool Daily Post - MR HULLEY AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION -
A party of gentlemen proposing to establish a gymnasium at Derby have communicated with Mr. Hulley,
of the Rotunda, for some plans of such an institution. Mr. Hulley has forwarded them, and the
arrangements will probably be made at his suggestions.

1863 17 Mar - Liverpool Mercury - Physical Education. -
We have frequently with pleasure noticed the efforts made to establish a regular system of physical
education in different parts of this country, and trust they will be persevered in until final success is
attained. The importance of physical training and exercise, in order to fit, not only the body but the mind
for the race and battle of life, is widely recognized now, and we do not despair of seeing the principle still
more extensively accepted and acted upon.
The good example set by Mr Hulley has successfully reawakened throughout the country the old English
passion for manly exercises, and it is with great pleasure we hear that Manchester has worthily followed
the lead of Liverpool, and established an Athletic Club, which purposes holding its first grand assault-at-
arms in the Free Trade Hall, on Tuesday next. Several of the pioneers of the physical education
movement have been invited to attend and take part in the proceedings. Liverpool will be represented
by Messrs Hulley, Shrapnell, Roberts, and Parkinson. The chair will be occupied by the Mayor of
Manchester.

1863 02 May - Cheshire Observer and General Advertiser - PHYSICAL EDUCATION. TO HENRY CLOWES ESQ,
CHESTER.
SIR, replying to your letter of the 24th inst, which appears in the Daily Post this morning, I beg to thank
you for its kind expressions of interest in the operations of the Athletic Club. By to-night's post, I will send
you copies of the rules, which will afford you all the information you desire, respecting the conditions
and terms of membership, etc. I may state that we have now about 300 members, and this may be
considered a great success when it is remembered that our gymnasium has been open for practice
only about six months. You are doubtless aware that the Olympic festival which you refer it to
(forthcoming on the 13th of June) is the second of the kind which will have taken place under the
auspices of our club, the first having been in June last year, and it is our intention to continue these
festivals annually. Besides these, we have an indoor display every winter, the last being the grand
assault-at-arms held in St Georges Hall, in December last year. My confrere, Mr Hulley, is a great
enthusiast on the subject of physical education, and devotes the energies of a most energetic and
cultivated mind to the furtherance of the movement which he, to a great extent, has initiated. Liverpool
owes to him the pre-eminence in the athletic exercises which she now enjoys, and while the club is
under his direction excellent supervision and ultimate success are assured to it. I agree with you that
such reunions as the one for which we are now preparing have a tendency to assist all those great
movements, (and amongst them the temperance movement to which you make a special reference),
which have for their aim the improvement of the popular habits. They serve to develop invaluable
qualities; for the privations which have to be submitted to in the preparatory training, demand self-
denial, moral courage, and the concentration of purpose. People are now beginning to understand and
appreciate the important fact that perfection of health and strength - which is the sine qua non of
excellence in all manly exercises -- is unattainable, except in conjunction with the most abstinence
living, and the greatest moderation in all things. Since the love of such exercises, and the desire to
excel in them, are in boring in every Englishman, the knowledge of the above facts will supply a
powerful motive for avoiding those excesses, which too often disfigure the leisure of young men in large
towns.
I shall at all times most cheerfully furnish you with any information which you may
desire regarding the progress of our club -- I am, Sir, yours truly,
D. C. KEELING, Hon Sec., L.A. C. Rotunda Gymnasium, 25th April, 1863.

1863 06 May - Liverpool Mercury - Correspondence - Physical Education -
To the Editors of the Liverpool Mercury
Gentlemen, I think there could not be a better time than the present, now that such a deal is being made,
said and written on the important subject of physical education, to express my opinion with regard to a
testimonial being presented to Mr John Hulley, honorary secretary of the Athletic Club. I think no one
man in Liverpool has done more for his fellow-townsmen than Mr Hulley. He, in a great measure, may
be called the pioneer of the great movement in this town. Although gymnasia have existed here
sometime, yet the attention of the whole world has not been drawn to them and physical education,
generally, as has been the case since the opening of the Rotunda: and I think it but just he that those
who have been brought to see it in a proper light through his exertion should in some way show their
esteem, and prove that his endeavours have been properly appreciated, and so encourage him in his
great enterprise; and the Athletic Club, whose honorary secretary he is, also deserve the warmest praise
for the assistance they have rendered Mr Hulley, in his arduous labourers.
Yours, &c., A .B. C. New Brighton, May 4, 1863.

1863 09 May - Liverpool Daily Post - THE OLYMPIC FESTIVAL -
The preparations for this great festival are proceeding on a scale of the upmost completeness, and will
be fully worthy of might well be a national meeting. Mr. Hulley, as usual, is sparing no pains or expense
either to render the festival a brilliant and perfect athletic demonstration or to make the public fully
acquainted beforehand with the attractions it is likely to present.
In the way of announcements Mr. Hulley has hit upon an unusual and elegant device. He has
commissioned Mr. Penn to paint, with the assistance of Mr. George Dawson, a large cartoon, which has
now been placed above the Rotunda in Bold-street. The words ”Grand Olympic Festival” in colossal
letters occupy the centre of the canvas, and beneath it is placed the date. At each side is placed a
representation of the medal of the Athletic Club. At the apex is an allegorical group designed artistically,
the subject being “Fame crowning Hercules.” The medallion on which this group is painted is encircled
with the motto “Palmam qui meriut ferat,” # and at the foot of the canvas is the motto, in gold letters on a
white scroll, “Mens sana in corpore sana.”## A silk union-jack of very smart appearance floats from the
summit of this novel and artistic placard, which, by the way, is bordered with a well-panted design in
laurel. The erection gives the building quite a festive aspect, and will keep the athletic festival before the
public in a very effectual and at the same time very tasteful way.
# “Let him who meets warrants”
##“A healthy mind in a healthy body”

1863 29 May - Liverpool Mercury - Imperial Parliament - House of Commons on Thursday, May 28
The Progress of Physical Education.
The following letter furnishes another proof of the interest which is being excited throughout the country
on the subject of the conservation of athletic habits as a necessity for the proper development of the
nature and powers of man.
Severn End, Upton-on-Severn, May 20 7, 1863.
Sir Edmund Lachmere presents his compliments to Mr John Hulley, and will feel much obliged to him if
he will have the kindness to send to Sir Edmund the rules and other particulars of the Liverpool
Athletic Club. Sir Edmund is very desirous to encourage athletic sports and a competition for prizes in
the pleasure grounds at Worcester, and he wishes to procure all the information he can as to the
establishment of athletic games in other places.
If Mr Hulley will kindly send him any rules, papers, or reports (from the newspapers or otherwise), and
especially the particulars of the competition in June next, Sir Edmund would gladly return them, and
pay postage &c.
Mr John Hulley Liverpool.

1863 - Liverpool Olympic Festival held - organised by the Liverpool Athletic Club - John Hulley Honorary
Secretary. 12,000 - 15,000 spectators in attendance.

1863 15 Jun - Liverpool Mercury - Grand Olympic Festival -
The second annual great international Olympic Festival in connection with the Liverpool Athletic Club
took place on Saturday last, at the Mount Vernon Parade Ground (including) Mr Hulley, the indefatigable
honorary secretary, and the committee, had used every excursion to render the affair a complete
success, and the thousands who were present on Saturday, must admit that this second Olympic Festival
was highly successful in every respect.

1863 07 Oct - Liverpool Mercury - Gymnasium for Ulverston -
(including) We again repeat that the town will be highly honoured by the visit of Mr Hulley and his
associates; and we feel confident that these gentlemen will meet with a brilliant reception, and ever look
back with pleasurable feelings to the visit to the old town. Soulby's Ulverston paper.

1863 22 Oct - Lecture on Physical Education delivered at Alverstone, by John Hulley Esq., of Liverpool (source: Minds,
Bodies and Souls - An Anthology of the Olympic Heritage Network by Dr. Don Anthony - pps11,12)

MUNICIPALITIES, Counties, Associations, very properly foster the improvement of cattle, sheep, plants,
and flowers; but no patronage, no bounty is offered - no honour conferred or applause bestowed for the
means of invigorating the weak, renovating the sick, rejuvenating the care-worn, or for perfecting or
striving for the perfection of the noblest work of God - man. A class of athletic institutes for public gym-
-nastic exercises for the separate use of both sexes would repay, in a thousand ways, the public outlay.
They would afford an agreeable resort for the aged and a pastime for the young. If they were establish- -
-ed in all our towns and cities for the free use of the people, they would contribute more towards raising
us up a healthy, brave, manly and handsome race of men and women than all the institutions at present
existing. Money expended on raising up such a race of men, would be better invested for the defence of
our liberties than in raising hundreds of miles of fortifications, and building whole squadrons of floating
batteries. By this hitherto neglect of the human body, the mind and spirit have been weakened beyond
all powers of estimation : and just in proportion as the physical system has been neglected, so the
conscience and the morals of the people have suffered. A correct system of political and religious
education should embrace a proper exercise of the body and the intellect - with the moral and social
sentiments, and nothing but the most partial comprehension of God's laws, could have led people of
warm hearts and good sense to believe that sound morals and high intellect could be evolved without
the full growth, strength, and perfect harmonious development of the human body.

1863 24 Oct - Liverpool Mercury - The Athletic Society at Ulverston on Thursday evening -
John Hulley, Esq, Vice-president of the Athletic Society, delivered a lecture in the Victoria Concert Hall,
Ulverston, on the importance and advantages of physical education. The appearance of the platform
was most picturesque, and had a most pleasing effect. Mr Hulley was accompanied by 12 members of
the Athletic Society, who had in the most handsome manner placed their valuable services at the
disposal of the Ulverston committee. etc, etc.

1863 14 Oct - Cheshire Observer and Chester, Birkenhead, Crewe and North Wales Times - VISIT OF THE
LIVERPOOL ATHLETIC SOCIETY TO ULVERSTONE.
Last Thursday evening, John Hulley, Esq, Vice-president of the Athletic Society, delivered a lecture in the
Victoria Concert-hall, Ulverstone, on the importance and advantages of physical education. The
Concert-hall, which is a very large building, and admirably adapted for athletic illustrations, was decor-
-ated in a most tasteful and beautiful manner, under the superintendence of Mr Grundy. In front of the
orchestra over the platform the motto of the Athletic Society occupied a prominent position. The platform
was large and commodious, and the upright posts and cross-beams were decorated with evergreens,
ferns, and flowers in beautiful designs. In addition to these were a number of flags and banners lent by
the Athletic Society and Charles P. Melly, Esq. The whole appearance of the platform was most
picturesque, and had a most pleasing effect. Mr Hulley was accompanied by 12 members of the Athletic
Society, who had in the most handsome manner placed their valuable services at the disposal of the
Ulverstone committee. Gymnastic illustrations are a novelty in Ulverstone, and the meeting attracted
one of the largest and most intelligent audiences ever assembled within the Concert-hall. A large
number of ladies were present. Captain Kennedy presided, and was supported by H. W. Schneider, Esq,
and other influential gentlemen of the town. On the appearance of the chairman, Mr Hulley, and the
gentleman athletics, they were greeted with a most cordial and enthusiastic reception. The chairman
briefly introduced Mr Hulley, who said:- I have to address you tonight on a subject which is second t
to none in importance, and which is intimately associated with every human interest. That subject is
physical education, from the neglect of which we in the present day suffer more than from any other
cause. The mass of men, even the most enlightened are content to pass their lives in the grossest
ignorance of the structure of the body, and in neglect of its most simple laws. Beyond the most obvious
precautions against cold and infectious diseases, most of us literally take no thought for the morrow of our
physical life. From childhood upwards this neglect prevails. In education there is no attempt to instil a
knowledge that bodily health is a proof of virtuous physical life. Indeed, physical virtue is not enjoined or
even explained, although on a sound system of teaching, bodily health, the food of physical virtue, would
be held up as a primary end of our endeavours, and as the highest honour of those who possess it. And
if the body is thus slighted during the only period of life which is a regulated by strict principles of
discipline and training, how much more is this the case when the trammels of education are thrown off,
and we begin independently, and after our own fancy to lead what ever lives we please? The omission of
physical training from the preparation for life, and from the actual conduct of maturer years, is the more
ridiculous and sinful, since the mind and body are so exquisitely linked together, that the imperfection of
the one inevitably involves the degeneracy of the other. That well-regulated physical exercise is cond-
-ucive to health and longevity is a fact all must admit; but its value in aiding the operations of the brain, by
increasing and regulating the nervous force, though equally true, has not received such general acknow-
-ledgement. Morbid and mistaken theories may have led to some support was that a healthy mind may
be obtained without a healthy body; but the Roman poet was right after all, and the more mental sound-
-ness is understood, the more irreconcilable it will be found to be with everything like bodily infirmity and
disorder. The ancient history of Greece affords the finest historical illustration of this truth, for it teaches us
that the people of that noble country were, mentally as well as physically, the most perfect of the human
race. Their unrivalled attention to physical education was highly influential, not alone in producing a
Venus or an Apollo, but a Home and a Pindar. Our organisation may be considered as the machinery
with which the operations of the mind are carried out; therefore, if you improve the apparatus, you facilitate
the operations which the mind carries on with it, and according to judicious or injudicious training, human
nature may be raised to the highest degree of perfection, or degraded to the lowest and the most brutal
point. If we consider that no movement of one part of the system can take place without reacting propor-
-tionately on the whole, we are forced to conclude that exercise, that is, the voluntary application of move--
-ment to the body, must modify the functions, and, consequently, the very life itself. The life of man is
double -- corporeal and mental, physical and spiritual, and the two natures which form this duality, and
which are so entirely distinct in the attributes, are, nevertheless, bound together so intimately that every
action of the one reacts upon the other. Consequently, while fully allowing that the spirit is the individual
essence of man, it is impossible to deny the reciprocal and permanent influence of the body on that spirit.
Bodily exercise, therefore, intimately concerns the entire man, body and soul, matter and spirit, and it
follows that no system of education is complete which leaves the body uncultivated. I cannot help
therefore, urging, as in most essential consideration for parents, the necessity of introducing into schools
proper physical culture. Suggestions of great value have been recently made by one of her Majesty’s
School Inspectors, that the overtasking of the mind and the neglect of the body are jointly and severally
most deleterious in their effects, and that a great reform would be affected if the hours of scholastic
occupation were reduced, the time so gained being devoted to the culture and development of the bodily
powers. What is begun in youth will be continued in after years; but, to get the full advantage of this in
the spread of sound ideas on physical education, we must early indoctrinate our youth with the princ--
-iples, and familiarise them with the practice, of systematic gymnastics. Mere play cannot be trusted to
effect this object: first, because it is likely leave many parts of the body undeveloped; and, secondly,
because it does not inculcate principles of exercise, which will be useful in after life. With all our miscel--
-laneous means of intellectual enjoyment and culture, we do not trust to tale-books for the mental cult -
-ivation of our children. We insist on the systematic development of each faculty of the mind by settled
courses of study; and so it must be with physical training, if it is to produce in use fruits of health and
soundness, which shall bloom and refresh us throughout life. Unfortunately, those who interest them-
-selves in the spread of physical education have to consider the cases not only of children starting in life
with fresh and ductile powers, but also those of maturer years, whose bodies have been to some extent
unnerved and torpified by neglect and inaction. Too many pass yearly beyond the reach of counsel or
cure; for there can be no doubt that the exhaustion of sedentary life, unrelieved by the invigoration of
exercise, is one of the most fruitful sources of consumption and the early failure of the powers of life.
But these extreme cases are less to the purpose than those of less serious infirmity and wretchedness
arising from the same cause. How few of the inhabitants of our towns enjoy that conscious vigour and
healthiness of frame, which is, to those who possess it, the source of innumerable pleasures, the
Palladium of their life’s comfort and content. They are a prey to indigestion. They are consumed by
nervous irritability. They drag themselves to their work, and through their work, and, when work is over,
exchange the weariness of labour for the fretfulness or dreary dissipation of lounging leisure. To how
many of the most intelligent and best nurtured Englishmen does this apply! And what a waste of power,
what deprivations of pleasure, what sacrifices of usefulness, what a frittering away of the human faculties
it is, what a shirking of social responsibilities does this common condition of things involve. Work ill
done, imbecility and weakness perpetuated through generations, the stagnancy of mankind, the creation
of morbid diseases of mind and body, nay the widespread existence of lunacy itself -- all this is the
inevitable consequence of the violation of the law of nature which dictates the preservation and devel-
-opment by exercise of those faculties, the activity of which is nothing short of poison to the human cons-
-titution.From the artificial and sedentary lives, which most persons in the present day fancy themselves
compelled to lead, the bodily powers are kept far too inactive. It is a well-known fact that when a muscle
for any length of time remains unused it inevitably shrinks, as may be seen in cases where from injuries
the muscles of the arm or leg have been, by compulsion, kept from exercise. And when we imagine the
whole body thus deteriorated (as will be seen from the same neglect of use) we at once perceive that it is
not, and cannot be, in that perfectly healthful state to which, by due management, it might be brought.
Now this deterioration of the bodily powers may, in a very great measure, be counteracted by a judicious
course of physical education.
To arrive at a physical perfection should be the object of every person, male and female; for every
pleasure we enjoy is based on health, the perfection or imperfection of which is an exact gauge of our
permanent and settled happiness. Upset the health, and the foundation of all happiness is overthrown;
preserve it, and the strings of tranquillity and peace are perennially fresh and abundant, and the mental
powers can be cultivated simultaneously with those of the body, without fatigue or interruption. But this
preservation of health can only be achieved by training, each portion of the body, according to its char-
-acter and formation -- by following that system which contributes most effectually to the development
and health of living matter. And this may be done with the greatest facility and the most moderate
expenditure of time. A person must be tied to his business, his profession, or his trade in a way which is
neither wise nor just who cannot make use of one hour a day, at all events, for bodily exercise, and this
one hour, if judiciously employed, will allow every muscle in the body being made to perform its duty, to
the great advantage of the general health. In asserting that these valuable results may be obtained by
moderate physical exercise, I am not speaking without book. On the contrary, I am drawing upon my
own carefully recorded experience since I devoted myself to the promulgation of physical education.
There are parts of the body the dimensions of which, if compared rom time to time, afford the best
attainable test of improvement of physical condition.
Now, in my own gymnasium, upwards of 500 gentlemen have practised during the past twelve months,
and I have preserved a careful record of their physical development. That record enables me to state that
the increase of chest measurement resulting from a very moderate systematic exercise, averaging three
times a week, has ranged from two to six inches, the improvement of other parts of the body being prop-
-ortionate; while their written testimonies afford the most gratifying assurances of the admirable effect of
gymnastic practice on their general health and happiness.
It is not an unimportant consideration that the development of the form by exercise leads to a vast imp-
-rovement, not only in the efficiency, but in beauty and grace of person. It was remarked by Mr Owen
Pike, in his prize essay that, "The same causes which tend to make people long-lived and strong, tend
also to make them good and great -- to call forth all the active virtues. It is strength of body, which lays
the foundation of all other strengths; and it is moral and intellectual strength, which, if misdirected, will
undermine that function. If well directed, will give all that is wanting to its permanence. As moral and
intellectual power gives beauty of feature, so bodily power gives beauty of form, and neither can be said
to be complete without the other.
As the savage has a tendency to misshapen features, so the civilised man has a tendency to misshapen
form. But the ancestors of the civilised man have at some time passed through the savage stage, and
then recover what they have lost with greater ease than the savage can obtain to those virtues, of which
even the conception is difficult to him." It has been well said, that the golden rule in the cultivation of
beauty should be, "Seek at first a powerful frame and a healthily-cultivated mind, and all the rest shall be
added unto you." To the fairer portion of humanity, where beauty of form and grace of motion give
charming influence and fascinating power, physical education is particularly valuable. Thus may be
acquired, those easy slopes and graceful curve lines which are vainly sought by artificial outworks and
chest-crushing corsets, which too frequently merely create chronic diseases, unseemly points, sharp
angles, and masculine squareness, instead of that curve of beauty, which is a joy forever. The finely-
moulded form of woman, fresh from the hand of Nature, requires no more artificial aid to keep it straight
than that of man, if she would strengthen the muscles till they became fall, rounded, and beautiful,
instead of weakening them by artificial supports, which flatten and distort them. Indeed, it would equally
contribute to the charms and to the usefulness of the ladies of our day if our Legislature could introduce
the law which was decreed in Sparta, that no young woman should have permission to marry till she had
demonstrated her proficiency in gymnastics.
The moral influence of physical training is not less remarkable than its effect in unshackling the mind,
and developing and beautifying the body. It is a great thing to get rid of all those morbid tendencies,
which are inseparable from an unsound bodily state, and which lead to so much moral corruption.
Moreover, addiction to the wholesome pleasures of the gymnasium lessens the attraction of all kinds of
dissipation. Especially is this the case with reference to that over-indulgence in stimulants, which even
where it does not result in intoxication, exercises a widely-spread injurious influence on individuals and
society. When the human frame does not need to obtain sufficient physical exertion, either from pre-
occupation of time, or from disinclination, there seems usually to be a craving for stimulants, both in the
food and fluid consumed. Those who are leading sedentary lives cannot content themselves with
simple diet; the most highly-seasoned are usually alone enjoyed, and the desire for fermented and
alcoholic liquors is frequent and strong, not only rendering the cost of subsistence much greater than it
need be, but adding to the nfirmity of the health, and laying the foundation, possibly, of intemperate
habits. Now, proper physical education greatly counteracts these bad tendencies. When the vigour of
the body has been secured by judicious exercise, this craving of an unhealthy appetite is subdued, and
the simplest food is eaten with a relish. It must be obvious to every reflecting person, how great a
proportion of the temptations of ordinary daily life are thus robbed of their fascination and power.
In concluding these remarks, I cannot help dwelling for moment on the vast and beneficial results which
would accrue to us as a nation, if the doctrines which I have endeavoured to enforce on the individual
were made part of public policy. Dr Henry Smith, an eloquent advocate of physical culture, has set this
portion of the subject in a very strong light, he says: --
"At present, it is not man, but money, that is our reverence. The shrines to Mammon adorn every street --
palatial residences stand in every square -- every eye is on the stretch for new markets, new modes of
investing money; but to establish institutions for the full development of the corporeal powers, and to
render our race healthy, happy, and long-lived, how little enthusiasm is felt, how little encouragement is
offered. "Municipalities, counties, associations, very properly foster the improvement of cattle, sheep,
horses, plants, and flowers; but no patronage, no bounty is offered -- no honour conferred or applause
bestowed, for the means of invigorating the weak, renovating the sick, rejuvenating the care-worn, or for
affecting or striving for the perfection of the noblest work of God -- man. A class of athletic institutes for
public gymnastic exercises, for the separate use of both sexes, would repay in a thousand ways the
public outlay. They would afford an agreeable resort for the aged, and a pastime for the young. If they
were established in all our towns and cities for the free use of the people, they would contribute more
towards raising us up a healthy, brave, manly, and handsome race of men and women than all the
institutions at present existing. Money expended on raising up such a race of men would be better
invested for the defence of our liberties, than in raising hundreds of miles of fortifications, and buildng
whole squadrons of floating batteries. By this hitherto neglect of the human body, the mind and spirit
have been weakened beyond all powers of estimation; and just in proportion as the physical system
has been neglected, so the conscience and the morals of the people have suffered."
The results of the general spread of such views amongst the leaders of society and opinion would be
incalculably beneficial, and could not fail to raise the community to a high pitch of moral and social
protection. Fortunately there are symptoms of the subject taking the place justly due to it amongst
public and national questions, and the prospect of locally obtaining its due legislative rank for physical
education is not so hopeless as it once appeared.
The great town in which I reside is singularly fortunate in the possession, amongst its principal men, of
one who has the intelligence to perceive the importance of physical training, the means to provide on a
larger public scale the appliances for its general introduction, and the spirit to employ his wealth in this
noble and public spirited effort for the highest good of the community of which he is a distinguished
member. I speak of Mr Charles Melly, whose introduction of drinking fountains, travellers’ rests and
public gymnasiums has won for him a fame co-extensive with the circulation of our current literature --
has been generally emulated in nearly all the towns of these realms - and will yearly strengthen his
hold upon the appreciation and gratitude of his countrymen. Much yet remains to be done by the right
men in the right places. In Liverpool, we have but seven gymnasiums, four public and three private,
while public houses are thickly dotted over every neighbourhood, dealing out daily the slow poison of
intemperance and little is done effectually to inculcate manly virtue We still work on, hopefully, however,
confident in the ultimate triumph of the sound and regenerating principles to the propagation of which
we are devoted. They will yet prevail. The community, renovated by the observance of the laws of our
bodily, mental and moral nature, will look back with compassion on the weaknesses, corruptions, and
immoralities or our times, and of the even worse times that have gone before them; and generation
after generation will approach nearer and the standard of well-being from which the civilised world had
so lamentably fallen.
At the conclusion of the lecture, which was well deliberate, listened to with marked attention, and
frequently interrupted by applause, the following gymnastic illustrations were given: --

Broad Sword -- P. Shrapnell, Esq: F. P Roberts, Esq.
Horizontal Bar Exercises - Messrs A. Angell, D. Crosthwaite, R. Eyton, T. H. Harrison, J. W. Holt, D.C.
Keeling, Spencer Leese, R. T. Parkinson, F. P Roberts, P Shrapnell.
Cavalry Sword Exercises -- F. P Roberts, Esq.
Boxing - D. C. Keeling, Esq; R. T. Parkinson, Esq.
Club and Dumbbell Exercise -- Messrs D. C. Keeling, Spencer Leese, R.T. Parkinson,
F. P Roberts, P. Shrapnell.
Sabre v. Bayonet - J. B. Lea, Esq; F. P Roberts, Esq.
Gymnastics: Suspended Ropes, Rings, and Trapeze- Messrs A. Angel, D. Crosthwaite,
R. Eyton, J. W. Holt, D. C. Keeling, Spencer Leese, R.T. Parkinson, F. P Roberts, P
Shrapnell.
Boxing -- Spencer Lees, Esq; T. Harrison, Esq.

The whole was unique, each athlete appearing to excel in some particular department. Everything was
done con amore, and with an ease and grace that drew down thunders of applause. Where all was so
excellent It would be invidious to particularise individuals, although we cannot refrain from observing the
astonishment of the audience on witnessing the ease in with which Mr Spencer Leese lifted a dumbell
weighing 140lbs. On the conclusion of the illustrations, Mr. Schneider, in a happy and felicitous speech,
proposed a vote of thanks to Mr Hulley and the gentlemen athletes, in which he expressed his astonish-
-ment to find how splendidly the muscles of the athletes were developed, and expressing an earnest
desire that ere long, Ulverstone would possess a gymnasium. The audience seconded the motion, and
carried it with acclamations loud and long.
We must not omit mentioning that the Ulverstone Rifle Band greatly enlivened the proceedings by play-
-ing during the evening.
After the illustrations, the athletes took supper with the Ulverstone committee at the Queens Hotel. The
spread reflected great credit on the culinary department of Mr Ransome. H. W. Schneider, Esq.,
occupied the chair, George Remington, Esq., filling the vice. Various toasts were given. The Chairman
proposed the health of Mr Hulley, and the athletes, which were responded to by Mr Roberts and Mr
Harrison. Mr Lee proposed the health of Mr Wm. Salmon, to whom they were indebted for getting up the
meeting, and expressed his thanks for the courteous attention which all the Liverpool gentleman had
received from him during the visit. Mr Salmon, in responding, said that he and the Ulverstone committee
would be delighted to reciprocate the kindness of the Athletic Society if it ever lay in their power. On
Friday, on the invitation of Mr Schneider, Mr Hulley and several others paid a visit to the extensive
ironworks of Schneider, Hannay, and Co., at Barrow, which they inspected under the guidance of Mr
Schneider.
In closing this brief and hurried notice of a meeting which will ever be remembered by the Ulverstonians
with pleasurable feelings, we may say that the fine healthy appearance, manly bearing, the grace and
agility displayed by the athletes, demonstrated the supreme value and importance of sound physical
training.


1863 21 Nov - Kendal Mercury - THE EXCURSION OF THE ATHLETES -
Mr. Hulley and a dozen members of the Athletic Club seem to have upset the gravity and drawn out the
enthusiasm of the Ulvertsonians last week in a degree that is really alarming. The papers of the district
seem to have lost all control of themselves, and nothing is met with but glowing descriptions and
grateful acknowledgements for the new sensation the Liverpool men have given the “Furness Folk”.
There is something very cheering in the fact of a number of gentlemen giving their time and services to
promote such a praiseworthy object, and the excursion of the Athletic Club in this respect contrasts
favourably with the “excursions” of other societies associated with Liverpool. But there is a law of
compensation in all things, and it is said that selfishness is the foundation of friendship.
We get a clue to the secret of the success on one side and the pleasure on the other when we read in
the Uverston paper:- “The ladies especially applauded the young athletes, who, no doubt, were inspired
by seeing their gallant exploits extolled by some of the fairest and loveliest of our far-famed Lancashire
Witches.”
And whether it is sheer wickedness, or whether the beauty of the fair ones dazzles the eye and dazes
the brain of the reporter it will be hard to say, but before mentioning the enthusiasm of the ladies, he
tells, - “The athletes took off their flannel singlets, and appeared in the costume of the Athletic Society.
The costume is very beautiful, chaste, and appropriate, and was the theme of general admiration. It
displayed too, the immense muscularity of the athletes.” The costume which is generally worn beneath
a flannel singlet is that of the Apollo Belvedere, and it is very pleasant to read such a high opinion of it.
We always thought it was good for displaying “the muscularity”. In this “chaste and appropriate “
costume, with eyes of hundred of the most charming women in Furness beaming upon them, who can
wonder at the successful exertions of the athletes, or be surprised to hear that some of them “never will
get over it”. Mr. Hulley seems to have been the funny man of the party. He is said to have “created a
sensation by climbing up two ropes, feet first;” and the reporter facetiously says that if this were generally
practised many lives would be saved in case of fire! - Porcupine.

1863 03 Dec - Liverpool Mercury - Grand Assault at Arms -
a new winter festival and assault at arms in connection with the Liverpool Athletic Society was held last
evening, at the Theatre-Royal, and was attended with that remarkable success, which has ever
characterised the gatherings that have from time to time taken place under the auspices of the society.
As the public generally are aware, it few years ago it was established that mainly through the
instrumentality of Mr John Hulley, an association designated. The Liverpool Athletic Society, which had
for its object, the promotion of physical education. (Including) He would ask Mr Charles Melly, the
previous president of the club, to second the vote of thanks to Mr Hulley, he having been witness to Mr
Hulley's indefatigable exertions.
Mr Melly said he had the greatest possible pleasure in seconding the motion, fully satisfied that it had
been well earned. When Mr Hulley undertook to bring forward the athletic exercises in Liverpool, it was
for no self-seeking on his part, but through love of the cause. Mr W. Rathbone had described Mr Hulley
as a very odd fellow, but added "He is is an enthusiast, and I love enthusiasts; they will carry the day."
He believed that they would find that in backing up enthusiasts Mr Rathbone had not been wrong in
other cases - certainly not in this case. (Hear, hear.) Mr Hulley had backed him (Mr Melly) up in the
establishment of the gymnasiums, which had had but a poor beginning, but owing to the self-sacrificing
energies of Mr Hulley had spread beyond all example. Two years since they were in their infancy,
nobody cared for them; but what they had become the result of that evening would best prove. Mr
Melly requested that the vote of thanks to Mr Hulley should be carried with three cheers, as the most
fitting termination of the meeting. The cheers were given enthusiastically.
Mr Hulley returned thanks briefly and in most appropriate terms, and after a few observations from Mr J.
R. Geoffrey approving of the club and expressing pleasure at the evenings proceedings, the meeting
terminated about 11 o'clock.

1864 04 Jan - Liverpool Mercury - Mr Ackerley, Mr Hulley, and the Rotunda Gymnasium -
To the Editors on the Liverpool Mercury
Gentlemen, During the last week. Advertisements have appeared, which, by implication, place my
character in a doubtful light for my fellow townsmen, whose respect I of course cherish, and whose
encouragement in the labours I have of late undertaken I have highly valued. The first of these was as
follows:-
Rotunda, gymnasium, Bold-Street, No annual subscriptions can be received for the year 1864, Mr Hulley
will cease to have any share in the Direction of the Establishment, and from the 31st instant, pursuant to
notice from the undersigned.
26 December, 1863 S. W. Ackerley, Proprietor.
The second ran thus -
The Rotunda Gymnasium, Bold-Street.
Notice is hereby given that the Partnership, if any, hitherto or lately subsisting between the undersigned,
Samuel Wylde Ackerley and John Hulley, was and is Dissolved on and from This Day (Friday), first of
January, 1864 by Mr Samuel Wylde Ackerley.
S. W. Ackerley, Proprietor.
N. B. The Gymnasium will be Open to Subscribers as hitherto. Subscriptions for the quarter ending the
31st of March will be received by the undersigned.
S. W. Ackerley, Proprietor
I will not dwell on the absurdity of an announcement by one quasi-partner that he dissolves a partner-
-ship but pass on briefly to explain why I feel called upon by the publication of these advertisements to
give a plain narrative of the establishment of the Rotunda Gymnasium, and of the relations subsisting
between myself and Mr Ackerley.
In the first place, I must protect my personnel character from all chance of being impeached by Mr
Ackerley’s reckless proceedings. Secondly-and this is the more important consideration-I cannot forget
that I am the acknowledged representative of the physical education movement, and that this dispute
and separation are far more likely to damage and throw back that cause than to injure me personally.
The rupture has arisen, not from any failure of our enterprise - which I maintain to have been a great
success - but simply from my not having taken the precaution to have proper agreements drawn up in
entering upon it in conjunction with Mr Ackerley.
For many years I have been impressed with the vast importance of the systematic training of the body,
and having experienced a benefit in myself, and noticed the need of it in others, had taken, in various
private ways, great interest in its spread. I had attended several of the great continental gymnasiums,
including that of Mr Tryst, the great Paris gymnasiargue, under whom I studied, and whose friendship I
enjoy, and I was deeply convinced of the need of such institutions in England. Nay, more, I felt sure that
such an institution would be remunerative, and I had often been encouraged to commence a gymnas- -
-ium under my own direction. Being unoccupied and unemployed and unencumbered, and having, I
confess, some ambition to be of service in a recognized way to my fellow creatures, I was nothing loth
when Mr Ackerley, whose family I had long known and respected, proposed to join me in such an enter-
-prise. It was clearly understood between us that my practical experience was to be considered as of
equal value with his capital. He was to look out for premises on the suitability of which we were to agree.
Both of us took steps to secure the Rotunda. We agreed upon taking it in our joint names, and the place
was bought on very advantageous terms. The actual purchase, however, was made in Mr Ackerley's
sole name, but with a clear understanding that if at any subsequent period the property was sold the
profit on a transaction should be equally divided between us. Mr Ackerley was to provide the capital of
fitting up the gymnasium and carrying it on.
Let it be at once understood, however, that though the premises and fittings cost £6,200, only about
£1200 from first to last was actually advanced by Mr Ackerley, the balance of the purchase money being
obtained from a building society. I urged that a deed of partnership should be drawn up before any of the
proceedings subsequent to the purchase were taken, alleging that I did that wish to trust any man, nor
any man to trust me. It was fully understood between us that such a deed should be executed, and it was
expressly stated that, as my name was publicly identified with the subject of physical education, it alone
should appear in the business.
I stated to Mr Ackerley that I believed the receipts, would on the first year be less than the working expen-
-ses, and for this result he was perfectly prepared. We agreed that neither of us, neither of us was to
draw any money out of the concern during that time. He was to attend to the books, and I was to have
the complete control of the working arrangements of the gymnasium. I believed that after the first year
the institution would be a great success, but it was settled that, if it should seem otherwise, I should
have the option of purchasing the premises and fittings at such a price as would simply reimburse Mr
Ackerley for his actual outlay with interest, without putting any value upon the time and trouble extended
by either of us upon the undertaking.
The preparation of the papers by which these arrangements were to be rendered binding was constant-
-ly postponed against my wish. Several weeks after the gymnasium had been established, however,
articles of agreement were forwarded to me for signature. To my surprise, I found that they established
a partnership for 18 months only, and that at the expiration of that time Mr Ackerley would be enabled to
take the concern entirely into his own hands. As I had distinctly said it would be a losing one for about
that time, it was hardly likely that I should agree to an arrangement under which I should have had all
the labour at working up the institution, only to be deprived of all share in it at the moment when it would
begin to be remunerative. Mr Ackerley's departure from the original understanding did not encourage
me to expect that at the end of the 18 months I should be very fairly treated, and subsequent events
have proved that my mistrust was well justified.
Acting, therefore, on my own judgement, confirmed by the advice of my solicitor, I declined to sign these
articles. ince then, I have worked very hard indeed, at the gymnasium, without any assistance worth a
thought from Mr Ackerley - indeed, he was rather a hindrance than a help. I have succeeded to an
extent far beyond my hopes in rendering the Rotunda Gymnasium a recognized model throughout the
country, as a mass of correspondence has satisfactorily proved; and by keeping it in various ways
before the country I have rendered physical education, a prominent topic of public discussion.
The financial results for all the first year, which ended on the 13th of October, were equally beyond the
expectations with which we started. The profits, after deducting 7% on the original purchase money as
rental (£450), and in spite of the unusually heavy expenses of the first year, were £69 1s; whereas I had
prepared Mr Ackerley for a loss of £100. As this latter estimate had been made on the hypothesis of
the charge for rent to be 5%., and not 7, it is clear by arithmetic that the results of the first year, though
the actual profits were only £69, was £295 better than my expectations.
This state of things encouraged me to hope for a very great success in the future of the institution, and I
foretold, from the regular and crowded attendance, the speedy necessity for its enlargement. But the
differences which followed upon my refusal to sign the objectionable articles of agreement led Mr
Ackerley, in June last, to serve me with a notice that in December our connection would cease. To this
I paid no attention, as Mr Ackerley accompanied it with a verbal message that no change would take
place till the 31st of March. I immediately requested him, however, to furnish me with the whole
financial accounts of the undertaking at the expiration of the then current year (31st of October) with the
view of purchasing the premises, as we had so agreed I should have the option of doing, at cost price.
To this, however, I received no reply, except the bald statement that I must pay £7500 for the concern, or
he would take it into its own hands. Mr Ackerley also stated that in the event of a sale I should have no
share in the profits. It was now clear that there being no written document between us, I had nothing to
hope for from Mr Ackerley, although I knew he could not conduct the institution alone. I was not disp-
-sed to pay £7500 for the property, since that would have put a clear gain of £1300 into his pocket on
the sale, when, if the property was worth that much more than had been given for it, one half of that
£1300 profit belong to me. I was determined not to be made a tool of; so I kept my work, looking out in
the meantime for other premises in hich to commence, if it should prove necessary, a gymnasium on
my own account.
It must be understood that Mr Ackerley has had from the every penny of the receipts, and that, so far
from deriving any pecuniary benefit from the establishment from first to last, I never took a penny, but
actually expended considerable sums in the furtherance of the general undertaking, without even
charging them in his accounts.
Mr Ackerley refused to have anything to do with the Olympic Festivals and Assaults At Arms, and
accordingly I took the whole responsibility of them on myself. Had I conducted these festivals as a
speculator I might have made handsome sums out of them; but I preferred to make the promotion of
the cause the prime consideration and each of these thoroughly popular and successful demonstrat-
- ions entailed on me personally considerable loss. I do not mention this to court public sympathy, but
to clear up the whole of the facts and to prove the reality of my devotion to the undertaking. Mr
Ackersley has chosen to avail himself of his legal position to oust me from the Rotunda Gymnasium.
Let him make the most of it. To me it never was a mere money speculation, though I am certain that it
would speedily have been a flourishing and a remunerative one. I am now making the arrangements
on a much more extensive scale, amidst the most kind and substantial encouragements, and
with the utmost speed consistent with the efficient promotion of the great social reformation, which I
have at heart, and which I feel that I have not unsuccessfully advocated.
I am, gentlemen, etc,
John Hulley
Woolfall Hall, Huyton, Jan 1, 1864.
P. S. -- Awaiting Mr Ackerley's reply: and, as his advertisements have appeared throughout the week, I
should like this letter to appear three days in succession, unless you hear further from me, and will pay
for its insertion as an advertisement.

1864 30 Jan - Kendal Mercury - VISIT TO KENDAL OF THE LIVERPOOL ATHLETIC SOCIETY
The third Westmorland Rifle Corps had the pleasure - we are certain it must have been the great
pleasure - of introducing last Thursday evening to their townsmen a dozen or more gentlemen from the
“Athletics Society,” who were advertised to give "illustrations“ of the effects of physical education, in one
of the rooms of Albert Buildings. The corps - we mean the corps of very obliging visitors - were com-
-manded by Mr. Hulley, Vice-President of the Society, and a most indefatigable encourager of athle-
-tic exercises, at the cost of both time and money, and without the hope or probability of any return
beyond the pleasure of seeing a robust and manly race growing up around him. So much we have
heard of Mr. Hulley, and recognized his face at once from a ludicrous but we suppose complimentary
portrait of him in Porcupine’s Almanack of 1864. The representatives of the Liverpool Society are all
young men, most of them slight enough to look upon, but wonderful fellows at boxing, leaping, trap-
-ezing - that is flinging themselves away, head foremost, as if to get out of the world, and then flinging
themselves back again - sword exercise, exercises with clubs and dumb-bells, &c.
The Rifle Band was in attendance, in their sparkling new uniform, and certainly as far as the music was
concerned did not seem a bit the worse for it, as one might naturally have expected from such splendid
looking coats. They played well, and nearly the whole of the evening. The Mayor - Captain Whitwell,
presided, and in a few enthuseastic remarks introduced Vice-President Hulley, who opened the pro-
-ceedings with a lecture on Physical Education. which was sound and excellent, and which was receiv-
-ed with the courtesy it deserved, and loudly applauded at the conclusion.
(John Hulley’s speech - 162 lines long - see the account of his speech at Ulverston on 14 October 1863)
Mr. Hulley said he would not further detain them from the active illustrations of the evening - The
“Illustrations” then followed. (Inc.) The Gymnastics consisted of the usual trapeze leaping, swinging, &c.:
and in these performances Mr. Hulley gave one “illustration,” by going up to the roof of the room, feet
uppermost, on two loose ropes; a clever performance which elicited loud cheers.
On the whole the feats were very successful. The room was crowded, and the entertainment was
popular, well sustained, and loudly applauded. It showed, moreover, the value of physical training; but
we fancy, affer all, it may be overdone. Mr. Hulley seemed to us whilst reading like a man who could
very soon “run himself out of breath,” and we have no doubt this arises from too violent exercise. We
expected, having heard so much of this club, to find the commander-in-chief with a voice like a bell, but
he had not. If not carried too far, the exercise is capital, and we should rejoice to hear and see that the
Kendal Riflemen had reaped the benefit of their spirited invitation to the Athletic Society. Mr Hulley
received a warm vote of thanks at the conclusion of his lecture, and deserved it, for right or wrong he
means well, and acts generously. And there is little doubt that he is right in the main, if his lessons are
not carried out too far. There is great want of physical education. A man should learn to swim, wrestle
and play cricket, and if he likes to spar, and pull himself up by ropes, there’s no great harm in it, but
perhaps a little good, if his boxing powers do not make him a quarrelsome annoying fellow, in which
case we fancy he would get many a thrashing from persons who never had boxing gloves on.
At all events the Rifle Corps is the right body to encourage athletic exercises, and their athletic club
may become very useful in the town. After the conclusion of the entertainment the Kendal Club and the
amateurs supped together at the King’s Arms Hotel.

1864 02 Feb - The Standard - M. TRIAT AND THE LIVERPOOL ATHLETIC SOCIETY. --
At a late meeting of the committee on the Liverpool Athletic Society It was resolved that the gold medal
of the society should be presented to M. Triat, of Paris, in consideration of the great services rendered by
him towards the advancement of physical education. It was also proposed at the same meeting, that
John Hulley Esq, the vice president of the society, be requested to present the medal to M. Triat, when
he visits Paris in the course of the forthcoming spring.

1864 06 Feb - The Preston Guardian - Correspondence - Gymnastic Exercise a Prevention nd Cure for Consumption
To the Editor of the Preston Chronicle. - (incl). J . Hully Esq., of Liverpool, who has a private gymnasium,
with upwards of 500 pupils, keeps a register of the physical developments of his pupils, and he finds that
by them taking moderate exercise the chest increase in measurement from 2 inches to 6 inches dur-
-ing the first 12 months; this is very important when compared the chest measurements given below by
Mr Fletcher.
Yours, respectfully, James Duthie. Peel-terrace, Jan 28, 1864.

1864 19 Mar - Liverpool Mercury - The New Gymnasium Company -
(including) The prime object of the company is to erect in a suitable place, a gymnasium, such as shall
fairly express deep devotion to physical education, which has happily become so common in Liverpool,
chiefly through the excursions of its most eminent and spirited apostle, Mr John Hulley, and such as to
spread widely around the conviction of the necessity and the appreciation of its enjoyments. We
believe that the directors have selected a site which will admirably meet the requirements of the case;
and they have done still better in securing the services of Mr Hulley, without whom any athletic
undertaking would lack a great prerequisite and assurance of success.

1864 01 Jun - Liverpool Daily Post - THE OLYMPIC FESTIVAL
We are glad to hear that Mr. Hulley and the Athletic Society are making extensive preparations for
holding the third Olympic Festival on the first Saturday in July. A reserved private day has been secured
at the Zoological Gardens by the Athletic Society for this grand display of muscular Christianity. We hope
to hear that some of the members of the Ulverston Gymnasium intend entering the list of competitors. It
is not to be expected that, with six months’ practice, they would be successful competitors against the
picked athletes of the kingdom, but the presence of several from Ulverston would, we are sure, be very
gratifying to Mr. Hulley and his confrères to whom the town is so deeply indebted for arousing public
attention to the importance of physical education. Let it be remembered, too, that in these manly and
friendly contests, whilst there is honour in success there is no disgrace in defeat. The motto of every
competitor, whether victorious or defeated, should be “excelsior.” To excite a noble, a virtuous emulation
is one main object of this festival. Honour the victors for their triumph: honour the vanquished who have
done their best.
As Liverpool happens to be a town much frequented by Ulverstonians, and as the taste for gymnastic
exercises is rapidly spreading here, we think the 2nd of July would be a most suitable day for a cheap
trip to the festival, returning on Monday morning. Thus hundreds might be able to visit the festival and
town. Probably Mr. Marcus, who is so spirited in cheap-tripology, might be induced to arrange a trip for
the period we have mentioned, - or even a day trip would be better than no trip at all.
The festival will be held under the presidency of Colonel Sir John Jones, K.C.B, supported by the Mayor,
many of the leading merchants, gentry, and clergy of Liverpool. The festival will be on a scale far sur--
-passing any proceeding athletic meeting. Soulby’s Ulverston News.


1864 22 Jun - Liverpool Mercury - Mr Hulley On Sea Bathing at Llandudno & Biarritz - letter from ohn Hulley,
Gymnasiarch and Vice-president of the Athletic Society. St George's Hotel, Llandudno, June 21. (see
copy in The Times, also copy in the Caledonian Mercury dated Aug 9 1864)

1864 25 Jun - North Wales Chronicle Original, Llandudno Directory & List of Visitors - St George's Hotel (incl) John
Hully, Esq., Liverpool. (also Jul 16 edition)

1864 02Jul - Liverpool Mercury - Programme for the 3rd Olympic Festival to held at the Zoological ardens on Saturday
July 2nd - Director of Festival John Hulley, Vice-President of the Athletic Society. (Festival postponed until
Saturday July 9th due to unfavourable weather.)

1864 02 Jul - Grand Olympic Festival held at the Zoological Gardens Liverpool - organised by the Liverpool Athletic
Club - John Hulley Honorary Secretary. (source - website of the North of England Athletic Association)

1864 05 Jul - Liverpool Daily Post - ATHLETIC SOCIETY’S SWIMMING RACE.
The annual race in connection with the Olympic Festival came off last evening at the Great Float at
Birkenhead. Twelve entries from first class swimmers from different parts of the country were received for
the society’s medals - the winner to receive a gold medal, the second a silver, and the third a bronze.
The weather was more propItious than on Saturday, and seven men appeared at the starting -place.
Their names were - Messrs Anderson, Mitchell, and Beecham of Liverpool; Thomas B. Stanley,
Manchester; John Dow, and C. Tinker, Huddersfield. A boat was supplied by the society to accompany
each competitor ; and the vice president, Mr. Hulley, officiated as judge, Mr. D. C. Keeling, hon. secret-
-ary, and several members of the committee accompanying him in the boat, all wearing the uniform of
the society . (Winner Mr. Dow, second Mr. Anderson , third Mr. Stanley.)

1864 08 Jul - Liverpool Mercury - THE LIVERPOOL ATHLETES IN LONDON.
Mr. Hulley had a distinguished triumph in London on Wednesday, and we trust we may deem it an omen
of the good fortune that awaits him on Saturday. The German Turners of London, under the presidency
of Herr Ravenstein, met on that day at the Crystal Palace , and a vast and brilliant throng attended to
witness their feats. Among the candidates were three Liverpool men and each carried off a prize,
although the contests were particularly exacting, from the fact that all competitors were obliged to be
judged by their proficiency in the whole course of German exercises, as well as to exhibit skill and
prowess in each particular contest. The London press unanimously award high praise to the Liverpool
men, and also mention in terms of honour Mr. Melly and Mr. Hulley as the principal supporters of the
athletic movement in Liverpool. We may add that the plans of the new gymnasium about to be erected
by the company of which Mr. Melly is the leading director, and which his high reputation and indefatig-
-able exertions have placed so favourably before the public, were exhibited, and the proposed working of
the institution by the gymnasiarch, Mr. Hulley, explained. Both received warm encomiums.
At this banquet, Mr. Ravenstein presided, supported by Mr. Hulley. Many speeches were delivered on
the value of conjoined physical and mental training, and the warmest sympathy was expressed towards
the Liverpool athletes, with reference to the brilliant contests we expect to take place at the Zoological
Gardens. The scene was a very brilliant and interesting one throughout, and the great success of the
Liverpool competitors gives the description of it special local interest quite equal to that which it
excites as a grand demonstration of the principles of physical culture.

1864 11 Jul - Liverpool Daily Post - OLYMPIC FESTIVAL - WALKING MATCH FOUR MILES.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE DAILY POST
SIR, - I know that it is a very difficult matter for a festival of this description to pass off satisfactorily, and
there are facts in reference to the above match which I have seriously have to complain as a competitor,
viz. : On the 11th lap I was abruptly twisted by the shoulder and thrown against the ropes by Mr. Barker’s
engaged “professional referee,” and cooly informed “that it was no use my walking any further in that
way,”, and this, too, without any previous warning from him. I at once retired; but, at the solicitation of
my friends, I finished the distance of four miles , and was placed by the judge for 3rd prize. Now, this
proceeding, by one who had no authority to act as a referee (only by Mr. Barker, who was one of my
opponents in the match), was very insulting. Mr. Hulley, and the “official referee” (Mr. Robertson) could
not explain to the judge why this person was engaged; and it was further stated by Mr. Robertson that
“my walking was as fair as any other competitor in the match.”
I beg most respectfully to enter my protest against this uncouth conduct, and require an explanation from
the committee; also, according to the rules of the Oxford and Cambridge “Gentlemen Amateur Racing” I
am entitled to the first prize.
I will thank you for space in your valuable newspaper, and apologies for troubling you.
Yours, &c.,
JOHN LANCASTER.
Woodside, July 9, 1864.

1864 16 Jul - Liverpool Mercury - Laying of the Foundation Stone of the new Liverpool Gymnasium
Another step is to be taken towards the complete establishment amongst us at that centre of physical
education, which has been some time so admirably sustained by Mr Hulley, and which is now under the
auspices of almost all the most eminent men of station and intelligence in Liverpool. On Monday next the
first stone is to be laid of the new Liverpool Gymnasium, which is to be raised, on plans which secure to
the town. The possession of another very handsome building, by the company of which Mr C. P. Melly is
the principal promoter, in Myrtle-Street, opposite the Philharmonic Hall. Etc, etc

1864 19 Jul - Liverpool Mercury - Laying of the Foundation Stone of the new Liverpool Gymnasium - account of
ceremony and presentation of prizes from the 3rd Olympic Festival by the Mayor.

1864 06 Aug - The Times - Letter from John Hulley Vice-President of the Athletic Society of Great Britain
SEA-BATHING in ENGLAND and FRANCE
TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES
Sir, - I have just been reading a letter published in your columns on bathing at Weymouth. My attention
has been very much attracted by the anomalies, and I must say indecencies, of the English system of
bathing, and, after some hesitation, I have resolved to address you, requesting you to bring your powerful
influence to bear to introduce a reform which will add considerably to the pleasure and seemliness of
what has become a universal fashion, and what, rightly practised, must be a universal benefit. I beg
those who are fond of bathing, those who enjoy the seaside, and those who value whatever tends to the
enjoyment or conserves the propriety of mankind, to give a few moments' consideration to a contract
Which I will set before them. I am aware that the inconveniences attendant upon public bathing at our
watering-places Has been frequently noticed by correspondents of the newspapers, but it has only been
in a casual way, and moreover in a hopeless tone, as if nothing effectual could be done to cure the evil.
Indeed, unless the plan I shall before I conclude, propose be adopted, I confess I see little prospect of any
reform.
Police regulations have been tried over and over again, and invariably found comparatively useless.
What also could be expected? If people go to a place to bathe, bathe they will. They cannot bathe in their
ordinary clothes. They cannot be compelled to bathe at unreasonable hours, and when they bathe a
concourse must necessarily assemble. Families sojourn at these places in great numbers, and the
family element introduces at once an idea of community, which contributes to the freedom and publicity
of the whole affair. The result is that the whole community bathe virtually in public. There would be
nothing in this had we revived, with the practices of the ancients, their manners also. Public baths are no
novelty; even the meeting of men and women at baths has been ere now an ordinary custom, and the
fact of the bathing taking place in The open air, instead of in buildings, is manifestly adapted rather to
encourage than hinder the revival of this custom, - firstly, because do what you will you cannot make
open-air bathing strictly private, or keep the sexes entirely out of each other's sight; and, secondly,
because open-air bathing is favourable to, and seems naturally to suggest attire such as would enable
The men and women to mix as freely with each other as when in their ordinary dress. But what a contrast
to this does our present fashion present!
Everyone has been at some watering-places, and it is not necessary, therefore, for me to enter into very
elaborate particulars. Were it so, my pen would have to be laid down, for the scenes which are daily
complained of by men to men, and by women to women, while living at seaside watering-places, are
practically indescribable in print. Almost all English bathing-places resemble each other in the fact that
there are rows of houses along the beach from which, without the aid of an opera-glass, the bathing
operations are freely visible, some houses from which bathers may be very easily recognised, and
some from which it is unsafe for a lady to look at bathing time lest her delicacy be outraged. Then the
beach is largely frequented by flaneurs of both sexes, who must either be very much shocked by the free
and easy spectacle afforded them, or prove, by Not being shocked at it, that they have already sustained
a degree of sensitiveness through witnessing it. The costume considered necessary is, for the men, a
covering of water, say about to the height to the knees. Nothing can be more natural. There is even
something picturesque and poetic about this manner of veiling nudity, but its insufficiency is obvious
when we reflect what a small proportion it bears to the amount of covering exacted in ordinary life by
recognised notions of propriety, and remember that numbers of ladies are also promenading the beach
and sitting in the dwellinghouses close to the bathing-places.
The female Briton when bathing has a slight advantage over the male so far as civilised notions of prop-
- riety go, inasmuch as she generally wears a chemise or shirt of blue flannel, open at the chest and tied
round the neck. It reaches a little below the knee and is just long enough to make swimming impossible,
but by no means adapted, either in size or shape, to effectively answer the requirements of decency. On
this point I will not dwell, however, further than to say that if ladies believe that their system of bathing
renders them greatly less than men objects for the inspection of the improperly curious, they are much
mistaken. I do not care to notice the argument that if people behaved properly they would not stare. It
suffices that people do stare, and that a certain proportion of people always will stare. What is required,
therefore, is a system by which the temptation to gaze can be removed, or by which gazing can be
rendered innocuous, or even invited by tasteful dressing, without any reproach whatever. contrast with all
this the scene that may be witnessed here any day, and you will be possessed with my plan, for I desire
better than the substitution of the pleasant and comme il faut bathing habits worn at this place, the favour-
-ite resort of the Emperor and Empress.
To my intense surprise, when I first visited Biarritz gentlemen walking down to the water with their wives
on their arms, and their daughters following them. All were dressed in a seemly yet convenient fashion.
The men wear simply loose, baggy trousers, and a skirted Garibaldi of the same or corresponding
material. The ladies wear what may be described as a simple Bloomer costume, consisting of jackets,
shaped variously according to taste, and loose trousers reaching to the ankle. The dress is completed by
list slippers, to protect the feet from the shingle, and a straw hat, neatly trimmed to protect the fair wearer's
complexion.
The complete decency of the costume was sufficiently evidenced by the fact that ladies and gentlemen
walked about together in it, and still more by the fact that on the part of the ladies the dresses were
trimmed in such a way to add materially to their comeliness and to prove beyond doubt they were meant
to be looked at just as bonnets and paletots are.
Dressed in this sensible manner, all the nervousness and awkwardness of English bathers are lost. All
is buoyancy and ease. The simplicity and convenience of the method of bathing influence the manners
of the beach, and instead of the mixture of leering and mock modesty which offends the critic on manners
at an English watering- place, the extreme social felicity of seeing and being seen is enjoyed each day
with as much gusto as if every day were a fete, and as if the company on the sands constituted one
continuous conversazione.
People walk about among their friends before bathing and after bathing with the greatest ease and free-
-dom, engaging in conversation, laughing, refreshing themselves, reading - in short, doing everything
that people do at our watering-places, with this grand difference, that it can all be done in the bathing
dress, and that the bathing, instead of an unpleasant furtive parenthesis in the day, when nobody likes to
be seen, and everyone hopes not to be missed, is freely partaken of in company, and becomes the
means of much enjoyment and social pleasure. I maintain that, if once the difficulty of novelty was sur-
-mounted, the introduction of this elegant, cheerful, and sensible French custom would greatly increase
the pleasure taken in bathing, and would vastly increase the number of bathers and the frequency with
which they can bathe. The present system is bad enough, for a man, and it must be much worse for a
woman, - so much worse that most ladies must have some difficulty in overcoming their diffidence
sufficiently to bathe, and many of the more timid order must be entirely prevented from doing so.
Could families bathe together in England as under this system which I am advocating they do here, I am
sure that they would find it a great addition to the delight derivable from a sea-side holyday; they would
avoid that miserable separation in the early morning which makes such a hiatus in the day, and turns
what ought to be a pleasure into a chilling and odious necessity, and they would cease to make
spectacles of themselves for the random or systematic curiosity of gazers from the beach or from the
neighbouring houses. The difficulty of adopting the new style would be only momentary, for the feeling
of strangeness, even at its height, could not be worse than that which every morning comes over the
wretched British bather on the present system, and it would be promptly succeeded by a sensation of
ease, gaiety, and sociableness that would render bathing an entirely new pleasure. Indeed, as a matter
of decorum there can be no comparison between the manner of bathing I am anxious to see got rid of
and that which I long to see introduced. There is another strong argument in favour of the latter. Much
has lately been said of the advantage of ladies learning to swim. I think that there can be no doubt of this,
for it may often save their lives; it will always give them presence of mind in the water; it will enable them
to enjoy bathing much more rationally, and it will add to the healthiness of bathing both to health and
suppleness of body derived from a graceful and strenuous exercise.
English ladies, as a general rule, on leaving their van are rather timid in the water, not having the advan-
-tages of a male protector. They cling frantically to the rope attached to the van, and disport themselves
in a most extraordinary fashion. The height of perfection seems to be the possession of a sufficient
amount of courage to give the greatest number of very low curtseys in the water, so as to immerse
entirely the head and body. It is very seldom that we see them go into water more than 24 inches in
depth, while those who go into that depth are generally considered to be good bathers and possessed of
remarkable courage. The majority stay about the wheels of the van in, say, about six inches of water, or a
little above the ankles. Now, I do not hesitate to say that all this absurdity would be got rid of if ladies had
proper bathing dresses, and if the manner of our bathing-places were so modified as to permit them to
avail themselves of the help and aid of their husbands, fathers, a brothers.
On every ground of health, convenience, pleasure, and propriety, I advocate this change. I am sure the
community will owe a great deal to anyone agitating this question, and assisting to set the new and
wholesome fashion and get rids of habits which are a disgrace to the boasted civilisation of the 19th
century, producing sights which are only equalled among savage tribes.
Depend on it, in any watering-place in which it is commenced will immediately become a favourite resort,
and after a little while, we shall find the practice emulated in every sea-bathing place in the kingdom, to
the great advantage of public decorum and to the greatly increased delight of the thousands to whom a
few weeks of seaside life is the only relief from a dreary humdrum and laborious town existence.
Yours, &c.
JOHN HULLEY, Vice-President of the Athletic Society of Great Britain.
Biarritz, Aug. 2.

1864 08 Aug - Decent Bathing. To the Editor of the Times Sir, Mr Hulley has done a service to the community by his
admirable letter in your impression of today, calling attention to the subject of sea-bathing in England
and France.
There can be no doubt that the way in which bathing is now practised at our English watering-places is a
disgrace to the time. It is a barbarism that poisons the source of an innocent enjoyment and renders
what might be recreation both obnoxious and repulsive. There is nothing squeamish in writing like this,
for I believe that 19 out of every 20 persons who have witnessed the present mode of sea-bathing
would before this have protested against it. But for the inveteracy of the custom. The remedy is so
simple that I wonder it has not recommended itself to the good sense and good taste of my countrymen
and countrywomen long before this. What possible objection can there be to wearing a proper bathing
dress such as Mr Hulley describes? I can vouch for its being no hindrance or inconvenience, whatever
to the swimmer, for I always use it, and four sons, all of whom I taught to swim, and are very expert in
the water, have always been accustomed to bathe in dresses. I believe with Mr Hulley that the watering
-place that first sets the fashion will not only make its own fortune, but the fortunes also of the tailors and
dressmakers who are fortunate enough to reside there.
I'd remain, Sir, your obedient servant,
Lincoln's-Inn, August 6. PATERFAMILIAS.

1864 29 Aug - The Manchester Guardian: THE MANCHESTER ATHLETIC FESTIVAL
The first annual Manchester Athletic Festival was held on Saturday, on the race ground at Old Trafford,
and was in many respects a great success, affording much encouragement to its promoters to
persevere in their efforts, and offering strong inducements to those who witnessed it to pay more
attention to those manly exercises which are so conducive to health. ..... At Liverpool they have been
held for the past three years, and have proved increasingly attractive.
The judges and referees were practical athletes - incl. Vaulting: Messrs J. Hulley (vice president of the
Athletic Society of Great Britain) and S. Jewsbury; Gymnastics Messrs J. Hulley, S. Jewsbury and H.
Warden.
(Incl.) At this time the greater portion of the company had left the ground, and the intention of closing the
Festival with a presentation of the medals to the successful competitors had to be given up, but Mr.
Hulley announced that the distribution of prizes would take place at the Free-trade Hall in a short time,
upon which occasion there would be an assault at arms.

1864 18 Oct - Liverpool Mercury -
An Olympic Festival took place at Wenlock last week. The Wenlock Society has elected Mr Hulley, of
Liverpool, to honorary membership, and awarded to him a silver medal in appreciation of his valuable
services in the cause of physical education.

1865 16 Feb - Exposure of the Davenport Brothers at Liverpool by Messrs Hulley and Cummins - reported in the
following newspapers - Liverpool Mercury Feb 16; Pall Mall Gazette Feb 16; Belfast News-Letter Feb 17;
Birmingham Daily Post Feb 17; Caledonian Mercury Feb 17; Glasgow Herald Feb 17; Leeds Mercury
Feb 17; North Wales Chronicle Feb 18; Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper Feb 19; The Era Feb 19; Reynolds’s
Newspaper Feb 19; Derby Mercury Feb 22;

1865 16 Feb - London Standard - THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS AT LIVERPOOL
The performances of the Davenport Brothers on Tuesday night met with a turbulent interruption. On the
usual request being made by Dr. Ferguson for two gentlemen to be named by the audience as a
committee, there was a general call for Mr. Hulley, who was in the Hall, and numerous calls for Mr.
Cummins. Mr Hulley declared his willingness to act if Mr. Cummins might be the other, and as the
audience immediately took up the cry for both to act, both ascended the platform. Mr. Cummins pro-
-ceeded to tie one of the brothers, and then Mr, Hulley addressed himself to the other. The latter
gentleman had not proceeded far in his operations when Mr. Davenport complained that the cord was
“stopping the circulation.” Mr, Hulley volunteered to be tied in the same way, but the objection was
persisted in. Mr. Wrigglesworth, the surgeon, was then called to the platform to examine the recalcitrant
performer’s wrists. He certified that the tying was not too severe, and afterwards added that Mr. Daven-
-port’s hands were so small that a very tight tie was necessary to prevent his withdrawing them with the
greatest of ease from the ropes; but Dr. Ferguson and the “brother” pronounced Mr. Hulley’s pro-
-ceedings to be brutal, and he was not permitted to proceed. Dr. Ferguson untied the “brother” whom
Mr. R.B. Cummins had tied, and the two brothers attempted to proceed with the remainder of their
performance in happy independence of the “committee” deputed by the audience.
(BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH)
The séance was repeated last night when the audience again elected Mr. Cummins and Mr. Hulley as
their committee. The Davenports objected, but ultimately agreed. On being tied one of the brothers
complained that Mr. Cummins was hurting him, when Dr. Ferguson, the exhibitor, took up a knife and
cut the cords. Davenport then held up his wrists to the audience with blood on it, which Dr. Ferguson
said was caused by the rope, but Mr. Cummins declared that Dr. Ferguson had made the wound with
his knife. There was a general uproar in which the Davenports left the room. A large body of the aud-
- ience rushed on the stage, pushed Dr. Ferguson into the cabinet, which they upset and broke into
pieces, carrying off the fragments as trophies. The police were powerless to interfere.An indignation
meeting was afterwards held, insisting on their money being returned.

1865 16 Feb - Liverpool Mercury - The "Cummins and Hulley Knot." Which so effectually baffled the Davenport
Brothers at Liverpool and Huddersfield, has been manufactured in gold into breastpins, rings, brooches,
&c., by an enterprising local firm, whose advertisement will be found in another column.

1865 16 Feb - Liverpool Mercury - The Davenport Brothers - Extraordinary "Manifestations." -- The "cabinet", smashed.
Detailed account of the activities at the small concert room in St George’s Hall on February 15, 1865.

1865 16 Feb - The Times pg 10
THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS AT LIVERPOOL (BY ELECTRIC AND INTERNATIONAL TELEGRAPH)
LIVERPOOL, FEB. 15.
The performance of the Davenport Brothers at St George's-hall, Liverpool, came to an abrupt termination
this evening. On Tuesday night two gentlemen - Hulley and Cummins - were selected by the audience
to step upon the stage and bind the performers. The process of binding was proceeding when one of
the Davenports objected to the tightness of the rope and declined to go on with the performance. A
disturbance ensued, and the performance came to an end. Many persons obtained their money back.
This evening a large audience was present. Dr. Ferguson opened the proceeding by reading three
conditions, by which the Davenports reserved to themselves the right of rejecting any particular
gentleman in whom they might discover a disposition to deal unfairly with them. During his address the
greatest uproar prevailed. Messrs. Hulley and Cummins were again selected by the audience, and on
mounting the stage Dr. Ferguson announced that the Brothers objected to these two gentlemen on
account of the brutal manner in which they had previously bound them. The uproar continued, the
audience insisting on the performance proceeding. After very considerable delay the Davenports
presented themselves, and the binding process commenced. One of them, however, immediately
protested against the tightness of the cord, and was immediately released by Dr. Ferguson, both of them
loudly expressing their indignation, and Davenport showing his bleeding wrist. The audience, however,
and those on the stage asserted that Ferguson intentionally inflicted the injury whilst removing the cord.
The Davenports then retired which was the signal for the audience o take possession of the stage. Dr.
Ferguson was hustled; the cabinet upset, jumped upon, and utterly demolished; fragments of it were
strongly contested for, and even, indeed, sold at a shilling a piece; the ropes were cut up and divided,
and the musical instruments, trumpets and bells disappeared in the general scramble.

1865 17 Feb - The Manchester Guardian: THE DAVENPORT DISTURBANCES AT LIVERPOOL
Full account of the events.
Our Liverpool correspondents, writing yesterday, say:- "The bursting of the Davenport bubble has been
the theme of general talk on 'Change and elsewhere today. At eleven o'clock a crowd of persons who
had been present at the séance last evening assembled at the shop of Mr. Hime (who had management
of the tickets) and demanded a return of their money. This, however, was refused on the grounds that
the money belonged to Messrs Davenport, who contended that the conditions imposed by Dr. Ferguson
had not been complied with. We understand that Messrs Cummins and Hulley, who were appointed the
committee last night, but who were objected to by the Davenports, intend to bring an action in the
County Court for the recovery of their money, and the result of this case will decide the action to be
taken by the others who were present at the hall. The fragments of the cabinet, which was smashed by
the audience last night, have been distributed most miscellaneously, and there is scarcely a
commercial office in the town which cannot exhibit a trophy of this description. The knot of which the
Davenports had such a seasonable dread is the only one which has hitherto effectually baffled them. It
is a knot well known to sailors, and was taught to Mr. Cummins, we believe, by Mr. Sothers. The
Davenports hurriedly left Liverpool today, for Glasgow it was at first said, but really, we believe, for
London."

1865 18 Feb - Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser
THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS BAFFLED - TURBULENT SCENES AT LIVERPOOL
The Davenport Brothers have met with a check to their success at Liverpool, and on Tuesday night an
uproarious scene occurred in the small concert-room of St George’s Hall, were the séances are taking
place. At the first exhibition, on Monday evening, the place was only half full, but on Tuesday evening it
was crowded in all parts. On the usual request being made by Dr. Ferguson for two gentlemen to be
named by the audience as a committee, there was a general call for Mr. John Hulley, the well-known
promoter of gymnastic associations, who was in the hall, and for M. Robert Bruce Cummins, a captain in
the Liverpool Press Guard, and quite an adept in the rope tying trick. The Liverpool Daily Post, in desc-
-cribing what follows, says: Mt Hulley declared his willingness to act if Mr. Cummins might be the other,
and as the audience immediately took up the cry for both to act, both as ascended the platform. Mr.
Cummins proceeded to tie one of the brothers, and then Mr. Hulley addressed himself to the other. The
latter gentleman had not proceeded far in his operation when Mr. Davenport complained that the cord
was “stopping the circulation.” Mr. Hulley volunteered to be tied in the same way, but the objection was
persisted in. Mr. Wrigglesworth, the surgeon, was then called to the platform to examine the recalcitrant
performer’s wrists. He certified that the tying was not too severe, and afterwards added that Mr. Daven-
-port’s hands were so small that a very tight tie was necessary to prevent his withdrawing them with
the greatest of ease from the ropes; but Dr. Ferguson and the “brother” pronounced Mr. Hulley’s pro-
-ceedings to be brutal, and he was not permitted to proceed. Dr. Ferguson untied the “brother” whom Mr.
R. B. Cummins had tied, and the two brothers attempted to proceed with the remainder of their perform-
-ance in happy inde-pendence of the “committee” deputed by the audience. A suggestion, made by Dr.
Ferguson, that Mr. Hulley should tie the brother whom Mr. Cummins had previously fastened, and vice
versa, was promptly rejected. After lingering some time on the platform, Mr. Cummins announced that
himself and Mr. Hulley were “ordered to leave the stage,” and this called forth renewed marks of disapp-
-robation. Dr Ferguson said all such persons as were dissatisfied, and wished to leave, could have their
money back. This statement was received with groans and hisses, mingled with cries of “Hulley or
money,” “Hulley or nothing,” and in obedience to the evident wish of the audience, the “committee”
remained on the platform. Mr. Cummins seated himself on a chair, and was loudly applauded, as was
Mr. Hulley on subsequently indicating in a similar manner his determination to continue faithful to his
trust. The disturbance continued, such epithets as “ humbug” and “gammon” being bandied about pretty
freely.
In the meantime the doors of the cabinet were closed, and the brothers Davenport were stated to be tying
themselves. On the doors being re-opened they were discovered sitting in the cabinet and apparently
elaborately tied with ropes, but this only excited the mirth of the assemblage who manifested their
resolution to regard none of the arrangements unless they were first tested by their representatives. After
the lapse of more than an hour Messrs Hulley and Cummins left the room and were followed by at least
half the audience. Several persons took the opportunity of bestowing parting denunciations upon Dr.
Ferguson and the brothers.
The exhibition then proceeded with “manifestations” such as have been so frequently described - hands
appearing at the aperture of the cabinet, a trumpet being thrown out several times, and a tambourine
being shaked and dashed about. So far, however, far from being awed by these “phenomena,” the
audience made them the subjects for laughter and derision. At the conclusion of the operations, Dr.
Ferguson with difficulty obtained a hearing, and made a short address, remarking that no phenomena
of any description could be witnessed if the conditions necessary to it were disturbed as they had been
that evening, and he was surprised that under the circumstances there had been any manifestations at
all. Still during his association with the brothers Davenport he had never yet found the manifestations to
fail. and they had not failed on that occasion. The audience expressed their dissent from this opinion by
shouts of disapprobation and groans. An excited personage in the gallery at this moment made himself
conspicuous by his loudly expressed contempt for the whole affair, other persons at the same time putting
questions to Dr. Ferguson, who replied to the effect that he would answer any questions put in the proper
manner, and then, addressing himself to the speaker in the gallery, told that person that his unbelief was
ungrounded as his fears. With this, the Dr. walked off the platform, the audience groaning and hissing.
Those that had gone away at an earlier period had their money returned; but such of the numbers who
had stayed to the end, on applying for checks or money, got very curt answers, and left the building much
disgusted.

The dark séance, which was afterwards held, was attended by about a score of persons, and passed off
with comparative success. One of the brothers Davenport and Mr. Fay were the performers or mediums,
but refused to allow any of the spectators to fasten them into their chairs, as had been done on the
previous night. One of the gentleman present, who persisted in inquiring why this permission was
refused, was compelled to be satisfied with the reply that the operators did not choose to give it.
We may here state that during the disturbance at the previous cabinet séance, Mr. Cummins declared
that the gentleman whom he had tied on Monday night had been unable to release himself, and had
been set at liberty by his confederate. So far as could be heard this assertion was not contradicted.
LIVERPOOL, WEDNESDAY EVENING
The disturbance at the séance of the Brothers Davenport in St George’s Hall was renewed this evening.
The audience destroyed the cabinet, and appropriated the fragments and properties as trophies. No one
was injured. It is expected there will be no renewal of the performances in Liverpool. On Thursday fore-
-noon there was nearly a renewal of the disturbance. A crowd of persons went to the shop of Mr. Hime,
musicseller, who had the management of the tickets, but Mr. Hime refused, without the permission of the
Davenport corps (who, it was said, had gone to London), to return any money. Ultimately it was agreed
that Messrs Hulley and Cummins should have a friendly suit in the County Court with Messrs Himes, the
result of which should rule all other cases. Messrs Hulley and Cummins were on Thursday the “heroes
of the hour,” in Liverpool; and “spiritualism” has received a decided blow in that town, where it had a fair
amount of believers .
The knot which proved such a puzzle to the Davenports, goes by the name of a “Tom-fools knot,” and was
taught Mr. Cummins by Mr Sothers, the well-known actor.

1865 18 Feb - Porcupine reports on above event - pps 369, 371, 372, 373 (all copied)

Page 370 - Order and Disorder - A Friend of ours, writing in reference to the Davenport fiasco on Wed-
-nesday evening says, "I see a great fuss is being made about the people who paid their money and
now wish it to be returned, What's to be done for me? I got an order to see the Cabinet and the Dark
Seances, and I didn't see either and have no chance of doing so. Am I not to be pitied, and might not Mr.
Cummins and Mr. Hulley to give me some compensation? Having nothing else to do I pause for a reply
and a £5 note."
We heartily sympathise with our much-injured correspondent and wish he may get the £5 note; but -
there's always a but - we doubt if he will.

Page 376 - Notices to Corespondents -
A Believer - We have been so inundated with letters on the Davenporft Brothers that we can find no
room even for an extract.
Curious - Mr. Hulley is not a native of Bolton-le-Moors. For his weight , inquire at the "Athenaeum."

1865 22 Feb - The Manchester Guardian: THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS: ANOTHER SCENE
Account of séance at Huddersfield.

1865 25 Feb - Cheshire Observer and Chester, Birkenhead, Crewe and North Wales Times - PRINCE OF WALES
THEATRE - a slight sketchy farce on the Davenport fiasco has been produced, and nightly evoked roars
of laughter. Mr. Saker, Mr. Hare, and Mr Hill made up, most effectively, as Dr Ferguson, William
Davenport, and Mr Fay, and a member of the company has nightly met with a small ovation for the
manner in which he impersonates Mr Hulley. A lady of the corps de ballet also makes up very cleverly,
as Mr Cummins, Mr Hulley's confrere.

1865 25 Feb - Porcupine reports on above event - pps 379.

1865 25 Feb - Sussex Advertiser - THE DAVENPORT JUGGLERS
On Tuesday evening the Brothers Davenport appeared in the Philosophical Hall, at Huddersfield.
Messrs Hulley and Cummins, of Liverpool, were among the audience, gentlemen who had been
initiated by them into the secret of the knot, against which the brothers, it is evident, cannot contend,
were selected by the audience as a committee to undertake the tying.. The result was the complete
defeat of the Davenports, who protested against the tying being proceeded with; notwithstanding the
opinion of two medical men that circulation was unimpeded; and having called upon Dr. Ferguson to cut
the rope; they all hastily left the platform. Messrs Hulley and Cummins were loudly cheered. The money
was returned.
The Brothers were on Thursday evening to have given the first of two performances at the Public Rooms
at Hull. Thy arrived in the town with their manager, Mr. Palmer, and Dr. Ferguson; but during the after-
-noon it oozed out that Messrs. Hulley and Cummins of Liverpool, had made their appearance in Hull.
This report was followed by a statement that the performance would not take place, and when the hour
for opening arrived there was but a small number of persons waiting for admission. The doors were kept
closed, a notice being posted that the performances were postponed.

1865 02 Mar - London Standard - CHALLENGE TO MESSRS HULLEY AND CUMMINS
TO THE EDITOR
SIR,- In order to show at once and for ever that it is not a knot of any kind, but the brutal manner of app-
-lying it, to which the Brothers Davenport have objected, I hereby propose that Messrs. Hulley and Cum-
-mins, of Liverpool, shall have the privilege of fastening them with their celebrated “Tom-fool’s knot” in
the presence of a jury of twelve gentlemen of position and character in London, instead of an excited and
prejudiced mob - the knot to be applied so as not to subject the brothers to needless pain, of which two
respectable surgeons shall be judges, and the jury of twelve report to the public the result.
H. D. PALMER. Manager.
“THE BROTHERS DAVENPORT TO THE BRITISH PUBLIC”
"We appeal to the free press and the enlightened and fair-dealing people of the British empire for a candid
consideration of the following statement, and for the even-handed justice usually given to all persons, rich
or poor, citizens or strangers. We ask, also, as a matter of justice, that journals that have published
accounts of the recent riots at Liverpool, Huddersfield, and Leeds, of which we were the victims, should
also give the facts contained in this statement.
We beg, furthermore, most respectfully to commend to the consideration of the Right Hon. Sir George Gray
and the magistracy and police authorities of the United Kingdom the fact that within two weeks, in three of
the most important provincial towns in England, without any fault of our own, transgressing no law of the
realm, and offering no violence or injury to any person, we have been menaced with extreme personal
injury, with apparent danger to our lives, as will appear by the following:-
“After having given over 200 public and private séances, or exhibitions of physical phenomena, as such
have been described in all the leading journals of Europe and America, and in our published biography, at
the Queen’s Concert Rooms, London, and the mansions of the nobility and gentry of England, we visited
Liverpool on the 13th of February, and, as is our custom, gave a private séance, to which the members of
the press and others were invited, who reported the satisfactory character of the exhibition. Feb. 14 we gave
two public séances at St. George’s Hall with like results; a private séance at a gentleman’s mansion and a
public morning performance on Tuesday were alike satisfactory.
“On Tuesday evening we were proceeding with another exhibition, when two persons, a Mr. Hulley and a
Mr. Cummins, acting as a committee from the audience, in attempting to tie our wrists, caused so much
pain that we were compelled to protest against the torture they were inflecting. We were willing to be tied
with entire security, as have been many times by riggers, sailors, engineers, and other skilled persons, to
give any reasonable test in proof that we have no active part in the phenomena witnessed in our presence;
we had no fear of ‘Tom-fool knot’ or of any mode of fastening that did not inflict unbearable torture. We
declined to be bound by a committee whose unfairness and even brutality were soon manifest. Hulley and
Cummins refused to retire and give place to another committee; the audience was to believe that it was the
form of a particular knot, not the cruelty of its application, to which we objected, and we were compelled by
an unappeasable tumult to return the money taken for tickets and postpone further proceedings,
“On the following evening printed regulations were given to every person entering the hall, and read from the
platform, in which we distinctly claimed the right of rejecting any person on a committee whom we should
find acting with unfairness. This would be our right were we criminals on trial for felony. Before commencing,
we invited all persons who were not satisfied with these regulations to etire from the hall and receive the
money they had paid for entrance..
“Messrs Hulley and Cummins, backed by a crowd of their friends, came again upon the platform, and, from
their previous unfairness, were promptly rejected by us as a committee. They insisted n tying us and
appealed to the audience to support them in their demand. They refused to leave the platform when re-
-quested, took possession of our cabinet, and in various ways excited violent manifestations in the audience.
“We were then assured by a gentleman of Liverpool that unless we submitted to the demands of these men,
there would be a furious riot. He promised that they should not be permitted to injure us, and we finally
yielded to his assurances. But they had no sooner placed the cords upon our wrists than they inflicted a
degree of pain which could not be endured. We protested against this violence, but in vain, and refusing to
submit to it any longer, had the cords cut from our wrists and left the platform, which was instantly invaded by
the mob; our cabinet was broken in pieces, and Hulley and Cummins, the heroes of this assault of some
hundreds of brave Englishmen upon four unarmed, unoffending, and unprotected foreigners, were borne
from the hall on the shoulders of their friends, apparently proud of their triumph.
“Our cabinet destroyed, and our business interrupted, with heavy pecuniary damage, in Liverpool, we re-
-turned to London, had now a new cabinet constructed, and on the following Monday repaired to Halifax,
where we gave our usual public and private exhibitions without interruption.
“Our next engagement was Huddersfield, Feb. 21. On our arrival we were informed that Hulley and Cum-
-mins, the heroes of the Liverpool mob, had been telegraphed to, coming with a strong deputation from that
town, to break up our exhibition. The expected mob was the common talk of the town. We appealed to the
police, and we are happy to say that, in this instance, a sufficient force was promptly sent to the hall for our
protection. The crowd that assembled gave many indications of being prepared for violence. When our
representative had stated the regulations adopted, and that we proposed simply the presentation of certain
facts, without any theory, and asked for the appointment of a committee, two gentlemen, instructed, it was
said, by Hulley and Cummins, came upon the platform and commenced to tie our wrists together behind us,
which they did with needless severity. We bore the pain, however, until, carrying the ropes through the
hole in the seat, they drew the backs of our hands down upon it with such violence as to threaten dislocation,
placing their knees upon the seat, and in one instance upon the hand of one of us to give them greater
purchase. This torture, deliberately and to all appearances maliciously inflicted, we of course could not bear,
and, at our demand, the cords were instantly severed. We exposed our livid wrists, in which every strand of
the cord was visibly imprinted, to the audience, who, to the great credit of their humanity, cried ‘shame!’ But
the mob organised to break up our exhibition had no such feeling, and made a simultaneous rush for the
platform, where, however, an efficient police force saved our property from destruction and us from a
violence which, under the stimulating addresses of the heroes of the Liverpool outrage expended itself in
hootings and howlings.
“We had engagements for two nights at Hull, but on our arrival we were informed by the gentleman who had
engaged us the chairman of the hall committee, and the police superintendent, that there were such indicat=
- ions of a violent mob that we could not be permitted to give our exhibition; and we received from the gentle-
- man chiefly interested the following note:- “ ‘ Music Hall, Jarret-street, Hull, Feb. 22, 1865.
“ ‘Sir, - As I believe there is reason to apprehend a disturbance at the hall this evening, if the séance of the
Davenport Brothers takes place, I have come to the conclusion that it would be advisable to postpone the
séance. I am sorry to do this, particularly as yourself and the Messrs Davenport have arrived in Hull, and are
ready to fulfil your engagement; but I am driven to do so by the organised attack which I am given to
understand is in preparation. I am also urged to do so by the proprietors of the hall, who are alarmed lest
their property should be damaged by any disturbance.-
I remain, yours faithfully, “ ‘ROBERT BOWSER.
“ ‘Rev. Dr. Ferguson, Royal Station Hotel, Hull.’”
“Failing to find at Hull that protection in our legal rights which we had supposed was extended to every man
on English ground, we went to meet our next engagement at Leeds where the scenes of Liverpool and
Huddersfield were re-enacted with increased violence. We were met by an organised mob, ands were
refused the protection of the police - when it was demanded. When the ring-leaders or agents of the mob,
taking possession of the stage, had subjected us to the same violence that had been planned and practised
upon us at Liverpool and Huddersfield, - the mob again destroying our property smashing the cabinet and
breaking up or purloining, our musical instruments; and we were protected from personal violence, amid the
smashing of door panels and the howling of an enraged populace, by the tardy arrival of a detachment of
police and the brave and firm conduct of one of its members. Our agent, contrary to all justice, was
compelled to order the return of the admission money, paid by those who had come for the very purpose of
making the riot from which we suffered. On the same day we had given a public séance, attended by the
members of the press and some of the most respectable citizens of Leeds, in which the famous ‘Tom-fool
knot’ was used, and in so far as we were able to judge, the phenomena exhibited gave entire satisfaction.
“It remains but to state two or three facts which may throw further light on these proceedings in Liverpool, as
reported in the Mercury, Mr. Hulley, when accused of acting unfairly to, and being an enemy of the
Davenports, said, ‘I avow it, I am a bitter foe to the Davenports.’ After such an avowal, what right has he to
act on a committee whose duty was strict impartiality?
We wish to be just to the police. At Huddersfield, though they could not give us order, we were projected
from actual violence. At Leeds such protection was withheld until too late to save our property.
“ At Liverpool the Mercury says:-
“’The appearance of Inspectors Vale and Southwell with a force of 30 men did not stop the process of
demolition. The police, indeed, did not attempt to interfere as long as only the property of the Davenports
was threatened.”
“ The Leeds Mercury, reporting the violent proceedings against us at Huddersfield, says
" Mr Walker, not considering that his hands could pull the rope tight enough, used his knee to assist him,
and the brother he was operating on gain protested...... Several persons had at that time gone to the
cabinet, and Davenport showed his wrist to some of them. It had a livid mark fringed with red, about the
breadth of a finger, and in the hollow of this mark there were the marks of the individual strands of the
rope.’
“Yet some have been found to insist on inflicting this brutal torture upon us, with howling mobs to back
them, as if we were malefactors or wild beasts. It may be doubted if such an amount of violence, wrong,
and outrage has been inflicted on any unoffending man in England since Clarkson was mobbed by the
slave traders of Liverpool, and Priestly by the mad bigots of Birmingham.
“And for what reason? What evil have we done? Of what wrong can any man accuse us? How have we
offended the public or any individual? If there were anything immoral or unlawful in our exhibition we could
understand the feeling which has prompted to so much lawless violence, which has been so largely
excused by the press and tolerated by the police authorities, We are called humbugs, but if every humbug
in England is to be mobbed, it may be well for both the government and the people to consider the
possible consequences. But we solemnly and earnestly deny that we have deceived any man in this
matter or made any false representations; and we can appeal to many thousands of intelligent persons on
both sides of the Atlantic who will testify to the reality of these manifestations. It was said to us at Liverpool,
‘Admit that you practise deception, and we have nothing to say against you.’ How could we admit what is
not true? For eleven years we have constantly asserted that the physical facts exhibited in our presence are
not produced actively or consciously by ourselves, nor by confederates, nor by any trick or deception
whatever, and we have submitted to hundreds of tests, and are ready to submit to hundreds more, to satisfy
any reasonable mind of the truth of this declaration.
“It is utterly false that we have refused to be tied with a particular knot. We have simply and only refused to
be tortured. We have been covered all over with the most complicated fastenings that could be devised;
we have been held hand and foot by persons above all suspicion of fraud, and tested in every conceivable
way, without effecting the manifestations which occur in our presence. In eleven years we have never
been fastened so that the ’force’ attending us whatever it may be called or considered, has not released
us. We do not believe we can be, unless placed in such pain as to destroy the conditions which this ‘force’
is able to act. With or without fastenings this power attends us; single or together, awake or asleep, bound
or held, and in whatever way our passivity is procured, the manifestations alike, in kind, if not in degree,
attend us. There is no fraud, no trick. Were we mere jugglers we should meet wish no violence, or we
should find protection. Could we declare that the things done in our presence were deceptions of the
senses, we should, no doubt, reap a plentiful harvest of money and applause. As tricks they would
transcend, according to the testimony of experienced observers, any ever exhibited in Occident or Orient.
The wonders of the cabinet, or still more of the dark séance, surpass all pretensions of conjurors. We
could safely defy the world to equal them, and be honoured for our dexterity. But we are not jugglers, and
truthfully declare that we are not, and we are mobbed from town to town, our property destroyed, and our
lives imperilled.
“What is the possible motive for these outrages, which some of the enlightened organs of public opinion
have incited and excused? Breaking no law we claim the protection of the law, which, we repeat, even if
we were criminals, would save us from illegal outrage. If we, asserting physical facts interesting to every
man of science, and doing our best to demonstrate their veracity, and satisfy a laudable curiosity
respecting them, are to be treated as we have been this past fortnight in four large English towns, who can
be safe from similar outrages? We have ventured to appeal to her Majes ty’s Secretary for the Home
Department, and we appeal also to every member of the British parliament, as we do to the whole British
people, to give our case a proper investigation.
“If, in spite of our solemn declarations of entire good faith, and all our efforts to demonstrate the reality of
the phenomena which attend us, we are disbelieved, every man in England has the right to absent
himself from our exhibitions. We do not ask the attendance of any person who is not ready to give a fair
and candid examination to the tests to which we submit and the facts presented. There is no reason for
excitement and no excuse for violence. There is as much call for a riot against electricity or a mob to put
down oxygen. We have not even an opinion to support or a creed to promulgate - only certain curious,
and it may be important, facts to exhibit.
“Shall we be allowed to do this? This is the question now to be decided. The riots at Liverpool,
Huddersfield, and Leeds, have excited and alarmed all England. In scores of places where we have
engagements, involving many thousands of pounds, our agents or those interested have become
frightened and their and our interests are placed in jeopardy. Shall they be sacrificed? It is for the people,
the press, and the government of England to determine.
“ it is our intention to go on with the work in which we are, in perfect sincerity, engaged. We are ready to
give in every town in England the proofs that we have given in London of the reality of the phenomena we
exhibit, and with which the tying of ropes, on which so much stress is laid, has so little to do that they might
be entirely dispensed with, substituting many other tests of an equal or more satisfactory character.. We
are ready, in good faith, to fulfil every engagement; but we demand, as we think we have a right to
demand, the protection of the laws under which we have voluntarily placed ourselves, and a little more of
boasted ‘English fair play’ of which we have head so much, and in the cases above narrated, experienced
so little.
IRA ERASTUS DAVENPORT.
WM. HENRY DAVENPORT.
(Known as the BROTHERS DAVENPORT).
“ London, Feb. 27, 1865.”


1865 03 Mar - The Manchester Guardian:THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS.
Copy of letter published by the Morning Post from H. D. Palmer, manager, and one from the Brothers
Davenport.

1865 03 Mar - Western Daily Press
THE TOM FOOL’S KNOT - From what has recently taken place at Liverpool, Huddersfield, and Leeds, the
knot named at the head of this article is popularly supposed to be one of which the spirit world is
ignorant. The Brothers DAVENPORT have been hundreds of times tied with all manner of knots by all
manner of hands - the hands of riggers, sailors, engineers, and others skilled in knots; and their attend-
-ant spirits, influences, or whatever they may be called, have freed them on the instant from such
bonds, as easily as Sir J. WILDE and a jury release a husband or wife from the knot hymenial.
The Tom Fool’s Knot, however, it has been affirmed, has completely bothered the spirits or the influ-
-ences. Tied with their famous entanglement of hempen cord, the Brothers, it has been affirmed, are
helpless, and as the popular belief is that to super-natural influences one knot must be as easy as
another, the conclusion the public have come to is that the brothers are humbugs, and that the pretend-
-ed phenomena which take place in their presence, in reference to which they are mere passive agents,
are just the sort of phenomena which take place in the presence of every juggler, who is not too proud, or
too pretentious to call himself by his proper name.
The public, however, as usual, it appears, are mistaken. The Brothers DAVENPORT have challenged the
Tom Fool’s knot, and it’s tiers, and have made an appeal, through the medium of the Standard, to the
people of England in reference to the persecutions they have recently been subjected to in Liverpool
and other towns in the north. The letter, in which the brothers set forth their grievances, is much too long
for quotation in our columns, but, in justice to them, we call attention to it, as we have published the
reports of their successive defeats in the provinces recently, which have appeared in the public journals.
The letter is accompanied by a challenge from their manager, Mr. H. D. PALMER, to Messrs HULLEY
and CUMMINS of Liverpool, in which he says those gentlemen shall have the privilege of fastening the
brothers with their celebrated Tom Fool’s knot in the presence of a jury of twelve gentleman of position
and character in London, the sole stipulation being that the knot is to be tied without subjecting the
brothers to needless pain. The DAVENPORTS themselves, in their appeal, declare that the assertion that
they refused to be tied by a particular knot is “utterly false.” “We have simply and only refused to be
tortured,” and it is fair to admit that between tying and torture there is a great difference. Writing of the
Liverpool séance the brothers say:-
“On Tuesday evening we were proceeding with another exhibition, when two persons, a Mr. Hulley and a
Mr. Cummins, acting as a committee from the audience, in attempting to tie our wrists, caused so much
pain that we were compelled to protest against the torture they were inflecting. We were willing to be tied
with entire security, as have been many times by riggers, sailors, engineers, and other skilled persons,
to give any reasonable test in proof that we have no active part in the phenomena witnessed in our
presence; we had no fear of ‘Tom-fool knot’ or of any mode of fastening that did not inflict unbearable
torture. We declined to be bound by a committee whose unfairness and even brutality were soon
manifest. Hulley and Cummins refused to retire and give place to another committee; the audience was
to believe that it was the form of a particular knot, not the cruelty of its application, to which we objected,
and we were compelled by an unappeasable tumult to return the money taken for tickets and postpone
further proceedings.
There are two sides to every story, and it is perfectly possible that in their desire to gain a victory over the
spirits and the brothers, Messrs HULLEY and CUMMINS forgot that the brothers were man of flesh like
themselves, and that, although their presence produces phenomena of an extraordinary character, they
are not insensible to pain any more than the rest of us. At Huddersfield the brothers declare they were
subjected to similar violence. We quote once more from their appeal:-
“When our representative had stated the regulations adopted, and that we proposed simply the present-
-ation of certain facts, without any theory, and asked for the appointment of a committee, two gentlemen,
instructed, it was said, by Hulley and Cummins, came upon the platform and commenced to tie our
wrists together behind us, which they did with needless severity. We bore the pain, however, until,
carrying the ropes through the hole in the seat, they drew the backs of our hands down upon it with such
violence as to threaten dislocation, placing their knees upon the seat, and in one instance upon the
hand of one of us to give them greater purchase. This torture, deliberately and to all appearances
maliciously inflicted, we of course could not bear, and, at our demand, the cords were instantly severed.
We exposed our livid wrists, in which every strand of the cord was visibly imprinted, to the audience,
who, to the great credit of their humanity, cried ‘shame!’
This statement is borne out by the report of the proceedings given by our contem-porary the Leeds
Mercury. That journal says:-
‘ Mr. Walker, not considering that his hands could pull the rope tight enough, used his knee to assist him,
and the brother he was operating on again protested...... “
Several persons had at that time gone to the cabinet, and Davenport showed his wrist to some of them.
It had a livid mark fringed with red, about the breadth of a finger, and in the hollow of this mark there
were the marks of the individual strands of the rope.’
Our opinions of the supernatural pretensions of the Brothers DAVENPORT are well known. We believe
that these are simply pretensions, but when the public go to see a performance or exhibition of any kind,
they are bound in fairness to submit to the conditions under which the performance or exhibition is to
take place. The application of physical torture for the purpose of getting at the truth has long since been
abandoned in this country, and if it is true, as the Brothers DAVENPORT solemnly declare, that at
Liverpool and Huddersfield they were tortured in addition to being tied, we submit that such a proceeding
is most un-English. It remains to be seen whether Messrs HULLEY and CUMMINS will accept the
challenge which has been given to them; but, for the credit of our countrymen, we trust those of them
who think it worth while to go and see the DAVENPORT exhibition will accord to the Brothers the same
fair play which they accord to other public performers, and refrain from lacerating their flesh or smashing
their “properties.”

1865 04 Mar - The Manchester Guardian: THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS AND MESSRS HULLEY AND CUMMINS.
Statement by John Hulley.

1865 04 Mar - Liverpool Mercury - Mr Hulley's Reply to the Davenport Brothers’ Challenge -
To the Editors of the Liverpool Mercury.
Gentleman, The Davenport Brothers challenge Mr Cummins and myself to tie them with the so-called
Tom Fool’s Knot, "in the presence of a jury of 12 gentlemen of position and character in London, instead
of an excited and prejudiced mob - the knot to be applied so as not to subject the brothers to needless
pain, of which two respectable surgeons shall be judges, and the jury of 12 report to the public the
result." I do not know that a man who, casually attending an exhibition of spiritualistic imposture, makes
it his business to expose it, pledges himself thereby to devote the remainder of his days to take the
exhilarating occupation of following about a couple of conjurers who ridiculously pretend to be the
passive instruments of an incomprehensible power. But as my name has become identified with this
business, I once frankly declare that I have no objection to again attempted to baulk the Davenports of
their prey - the money of a swindled public - but if they will permit the trial to take place on terms that
may benefit society; but before specifying those terms I must make a few comments on the particularly
modest and accurate account of which they have published of the treatment to which they have been
subjected.
Once for all, neither Mr Colin Cummins nor I have had anything to do with smashing cabinets. I am
under the impression that in Liverpool the onslaught on that precious piece of furniture was instigated
by the confederates of the brothers (and it is a remarkable circumstance that about one-half of those
present paid no admission money, but entered with orders). Certain it is that we did our best to keep the
invaders off the platform, and had left the hall before the cabinet was touched. At Huddersfield, where
we are represented to have delivered stimulating addresses, we did our best to prevent any display of
violence. I have as little sympathy with ruthless destruction, as I have with personal cruelty; but, on the
other hand, it is not for dishonest and convicted pretenders to preternatural power to complain of even
the roughest displays of popular aversion and contempt as if they had done nothing to provoke
indignation.
The narrative given of our proceedings under the signatures of the Davenports is worthy of the pen of
the sensation dramatist from whom it probably emanate it. The appeal to Sir George Gray, with which
it opens, is conceived in the most "highfalutin" style of boncombe, and is particularly racy as coming
from persons who, whether as dealers in the supernatural or as obtaining money on false pretences
that they are so, are probably within the scope of the law and could be punished if anyone chose to
prosecute them.
The accuracy of these brothers in narrating facts may be judged of by a few errors, which, though not
material in themselves, show how little reliance can be placed on their testimony. The brothers did not
give a private press séance on the 13th of February; Mr Fay gave it alone on the 12th. The press said
nothing about the "satisfactory character of the exhibition." The "two public séances." (that is, the
cabinet séance and the dark séance) which they describe to have taken place on the 14th took place
on the 13th. These mistakes suffice to show that at any rate the Davenports are not to be trusted in
minutiae.
My connection with this affair arose by the merest accident. I met Mr Cummins, about half past six on
the evening of Tuesday, and he showed me a knot which he had been taught, and which he firmly
believed the Davenports could not get out of, proposing that I should accompany him and tie up one
of the brothers. I agreed, and, from my position, being well known in the town, it happened that I was
called on by the audience to act as one of the committee whom Dr Ferguson invited them to
nominate. I consented on condition that Mr Cummins should be the other. In this capacity, we
proceeded to tie the brothers, and the one who was consigned to me soon complained that I was not
only hurting him, but stopping the circulation. The brothers say we refused to retire; the fact is, the
audience loudly called upon us to remain. They say the audience were made to believe that they
objected to the particular form of the knot, and not to the severity of the tying. Not a word was said
to the audience on the subject; but a well-known Liverpool surgeon testified that there was no cruelty in
the manner of tying, and upon this the audience naturally redoubled their manifestations in our favour.
The fact is that the form of knot, which is the simplest thing in the world, enables it to be applied
effectively without pain if the person tied will only remain passive. But William Davenport persisted in
wrenching his hands out of the position in which I placed them -- a remarkable thing for a man to
do who says his power depends on his passivity -- and the consequence was that it needed
determination, though not the least roughness, to give the knot a fair trial. Observe that the brothers say
that at Leeds they "exposed their livid wrists, in which every strand of the cord was visibly imprinted, to
the audience, who, to their credit of their humanity, cried out ‘Shame!’" Let me add, although I was not
at Leeds, and am not answerable for anything that occurred, a morsel from the account of the scene
given by the Leeds Mercury . The Mr Smith referred to as a surgeon of the Leeds Infirmary: -- Mr
Smith's, who had examined the brothers, stated that both of them were, to use his own words, "kindly
tied," that there was no violence, that he could place his finger between the court and the wrist, and that
if the Davenports were injured it would be their own fault. This statement was received with loud
cheering, followed by great uproar, during which frequent consultations took place between Dr
Ferguson, the Davenports, and their confederates. At length, both the brothers having been released,
during a momentary pause in the noise, William admitted that the tying was not painful, but that he
objected in consequence of Sgt M'Arthur having said that he was going to draw the cord tighter. Loud
laughter and a renewed disturbance followed this statement.
This is remarkably at variance with the Davenport version, and affords another illustration of the fact
that these performers, to whom passivity is everything, and who can do nothing unless they immed-
-iately remain perfectly quiescent, always manage when well tied to make their wrists livid by wriggling
in the cords.
To return to the events at Liverpool. The performance of the Tuesday evening was virtually upset by
the refusal of the brothers to be tied by us, and when at length and we left the platform a large portion
of the audience left with us and had their money returned. Next day there appeared in the papers an
advertisement attributing brutality to us, and undertaking that regulations should be adopted which
would prevent all disturbances in future. When we attended in the evening, as we felt bound to do after
this aspersion upon us, we found that the only one of the new regulations likely to serve the Daven -
-ports was that which gave them the right to refuse any committee named by the audience. "when
they discovered a disposition to deal unfairly." This of course meant that they intended to refuse
Messrs Hulley and Cummins, an intention which they immediately avowed to when the audience
selected us. The right to act thus may belong, as the brothers say, even to criminals on trial; but the
assembly were of opinion that it did not become performers who professed to court to the severest
investigation. Accordingly, they stood by us. It is not true, however, that we went to the platform at by a
crowd of our friends, except in the sense that a considerable portion of those present loudly applauded
our determination to fulfil the duties they had assigned us. That we in "various ways, excited violent
and manifestations in the audience” is simply and gratuitously untrue. It is equally, calumnious to call
us “the heroes of an assault of some hundreds of brave English-men." We had nothing to do with the
riot. Our only function was to tie the Davenports as the representatives of the audience, and no
severity whatever had been committed by us when Ira Davenport stopped the proceedings by having
his rope cut and pretending that the blood caused by Dr Ferguson's knife, had been occasioned by the
tying.
In references to facts I have only further to say that in alleging that I declared myself the bitterest foe of
the Davenports it would have been more candid, to add that I said I was so because I believed them to
be “about the greatest humbugs I had encountered; and I as a foe to all imposture." The brothers
asked what right I had after such an avowel to act on a committee whose duty was strict impartiality. I
can but say that if the brothers will only accept as committee men or jurors those who do not believe
them to be humbugs, they will have great difficulty in selecting a committee or jury, whose “impart -
-iality" will satisfy the public. They have no business to talk of any person being a foe, who is selected
by an audience at their own request to tie them, and whose manner of tying is surgically certified not to
be painful or injurious. They must submit to be tied; to remain passive during the operation; to insist
on no objection which competent surgeons do not corroborate; to get out if they can, and to accept the
consequences in public estimation if they cannot. It is not necessary for me to criticise the preposte-
- rous pretensions of the more general passages of the Davenport manifesto. It is a deliberate and
flagrant affront to the intelligence of the community which had better be treated with contempt. I will
conclude therefore, by stating on what terms I will meet the Davenports and respond to their challenge.

1. At an early date (say the week after next) the Hanover-square Rooms shall be taken for six nights,
on the responsibility of the Davenports.
2. That they shall appear and be tied by me and a friend, whom I would nominate every night of the
six, whether they succeed or fail in extricating themselves.
3. That no free admissions shall be given, and that the ordinary prices shall be charged.
4. That Mr Fay, Mr Palmer, Dr Ferguson, and the builders, except as their remuneration one guinea
each for the week's performances.
5. That they shall be no committee or jury, but that two known surgeons shall be appointed on each
side and properly fed, who sole duty shall be to pronounce whether our tying is calculated to give
pain when the hands are held passive.
6. That after the rooms have been paid for and the before-named expenses discharged, the whole of
the proceeds, which shall be deposited from night to night with a person upon whom the
Davenports and myself shall mutually agree, shall be handed over immediately after the sixth
performance to the Liverpool Children's Infirmary.

On these terms, and these alone, will I meet the Davenports, and I would exact them, whether we beat
them or they beat us; for if they succeed they will retrieve their lost position, and can afford to pay
something for it; while if they fail, they can hardly be in a worse position than they now occupy. Some
may think the terms arbitrary; but on reflection they will perceive that the Davenports cannot expect
me, without some inducement, to give them the advertisement, which my participation in their
séances would prove; and the prospect of benefiting a deserving charity is surely the most innocent
that can be conceived.
I am, &c., John Hulley,
Vice-President of the Athletic Society, Liverpool Gymnasium, March 3.

1865 06 Mar - The Manchester Guardian:SÉANCE A LA DAVENPORT
Account of a tongue-in-the-cheek performance at the Manchester Free-trade Hall mocking the antics of
the Davenport Brothers. Also, Mr Cummins explains his part in the forthcoming challenge - made by
John Hulley on Mar 4 - regarding the tying up of William Davenport.

1865 08 Mar - Liverpool Mercury - a letter was copied from the Morning Herald written by Mr. Palmer the manager for
the Davenport Brothers in which he refuted the challenge of John Hulley and reiterates his challenge to
him that Messrs Hulley and Cummins shall tie the Davenport Brothers in the presence of a jury of 12
men and 2 surgeons, one of the young men being held by any 2 jurymen hand and foot.

1865 11 Mar - Kendal Mercury DAVENPORT BROTHERS -
In our impression of Saturday we gave the main portion of Mr. Hulley’s reply to the challenge of Mr.
Palmer, “manager” of the Davenports. Mr. Cummins, Mr Hulley’s colleague in the work of alarming the
spirits, has since taken up the same challenge. He says :-
In Liverpool I had the pleasure of tying Mr William Davenport, and I shall, therefore, continue my
attentions to that gentleman, leaving Mr Hulley, should he think fit, to deal wtin the other medium.” I will
engage to tie Mr William Davenport in Liverpool before a committee of 12 gentlemen, six of whom may
be brought from London by Mr Davenport (it being understood that Mr Dion Boucicault be excluded).
The other six shall be gentlemen of unquestioned character and position in Liverpool , selected by
myself. Mr Davenport and I shall each invite a well-known medical man (I would suggest to Mr
Davenport the celebrated Mr Ferguson of London), to ensure fair treatment. Th trial shall take place in a
room selected by the committee , the furniture to consist of a single chair. I will tie Mr Davenport in
presence of the committee and xxxxxx after which he shall be left alone. If after the expiration of ten
minutes Mr Davenport re-xxxx the committee and satisfies them that he is free without having recourse
to any cutting instruments, and in another ten minutes appears re-tied in the manner I left him, I will
hand Mr Davenport £50, but should he fail, I shall then claim the like amount from him.” Manchester
Guardian.

1865 18 Mar - Hampshire Advertiser - THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS -
(incl.) The following, from that clever publication, The Liverpool Porcupine, tolerably well represents the
performance, as we are given to understand: --

The "manifestations" had gone all right
With the spirits-dealers, on Monday night,
In St George’s Hall, for no mischievous sprite.
Had as yet appeared, to tie them too tight;
Hulley and Cummins had cast no blight
On the juggling Gemini, Davenport hight;
Nor had their stars arisen so bright, --
Foremost in all men's mouths and sight.
"Walk up, !" cried that bland and oily wight, --
The long-legged humbug -- Ferguson; "Just
A-going to begin! Down with the dust.
Take hands, and keep fast hold you must,
For if you break the chain, affright
And calamity will befall, outright;
In fact, we shall be in a horrible plight
With the spirits that ever shun the light."
Already conjuring crew began.
To Cummins view as the coming man,
Who would work them woe, as they marked his eye,
And they hated him accordingly.
At the opposite ends of a table the "passive" two were bound,
Out went the lights, when there rose an uproarious kicking sound;
And then behind the table, each backed to meet his brother,
Kicking and stamping on all the time, whilst they untied each other;
Then a fiddle, rubbed with phosphorus, at the end of elastic thread,
Was sent whirling about, and made many a dart to strike Cummins on the head;
And the banjo, all a phosphoric glow,
Swung at equal distances to and fro,
With accordeon-notes fixed out of sight,
Which its motion through the air made ring;
But it couldn't strike Cummins, so short was the string --
it seems spirits aint quirt exempt from spite!
And clammy gutta percha hands were likewise whirled around
to slap men's faces and block their hats, till the fun grew quite profound;
As we sat in the broken magnetic ring with derisive laughter greeting the thing;
Then each "passive" bumped back to his former place;
And, after a little silent space
Enabling them their hands to refix
In the ropes, "lights up;" and these were the tricks
In the dark séance, at ten and six!

1865 24 Mar - The Manchester Guardian: THE “DAVENPORT BROTHERS”
Summons taken out by Mr. Robert Bruce Cummins to recover admission money paid to see the
Davenport Brothers perform a séance.

1865 28 Mar - Liverpool Mercury - Action in the Country Court. -- Decision against the Davenports. An action brought
by Mr R. B. Cummins against Mr Hime, the Liverpool agent of the Davenports, to recover the entrance
fee of five shillings paid to see a séance which did not come off, was heard yesterday in the Liverpool
County Court, before Sergeant Wheelan, Q. C., Judge. (Incl) He gave his decision for the plaintiff for the
amount claimed. It is understood that, by friendly agreement between the parties, this decision is to
guide Mr Hime in reference to all the claims made by other persons for the return of their money.

1865 28 Mar - Liverpool Mercury - The Davenport Brothers Row. Action for Recovery of the Admission Money. -
detailed account of the court proceedings at which the judge said at the end of the case that it appeared
to him this contract was with each particular individual; and as he had no evidence before him to show
that Mr Cummins had prevented had prevented the giving of the performance, he thought that the
conduct of the Davenport Brothers was a breach of the contract on their part. He must therefore give a
verdict for the plaintiff of the amount claimed.
The decision was received as considerable applause, which was of course immediately suppressed.
Although his Honour ruled that each case must stand on its own merits, Messrs Hime have decided to
refund the whole of the admission money to the proper claimants without further dispute. It will be seen
by an advertisement that Tuesday afternoon next, between five and seven o'clock, has been appointed
for the return of the money upon personal application at Messrs Hime’s Music Warehouse, or it will be
handed over to one of the charities, at the option of the claimant.
(also in the Hampshire Telegraph & Sussex Chronicle Apr 1)

1865 28 Mar - The Manchester Guardian: THE DAVENPORT BROTHERS IN THE LIVERPOOL COUNTY COURT.
Case against them proved and plaintiff was entitled to a return of the money he had paid. This decision
will determine several other claims, in which the facts are precisely similar.

1865 29 Mar - The Times pg12 col. E THE DAVENPORTS SUED
Mr. Hime, the agent for the Davenport Brothers in Liverpool, was sued in the County Court on Monday
before Mr. Serjeant Wheeler, Q.C. for the return of money paid to witness a seance, which did not take
place. The plaintiff was Mr. R.B. Cummins, who, with Mr. Hulley tied the Brothers with a "Tom-Fool knot."
For the defence it was represented that no definite statement as to what should be done had been put
forth in the advertisements. The judge held that the advertisements had promised a seance, which was
to be taken as meaning all that had been given by the Davenports on their previous appearances in the
town; and that, having waived their objection to the committee nominated by the meeting, they had
bound themsleves to complete the contract under those conditions. The contract was not completed,
the seance was not given; and the plaintiff was, therefor, entitled to the return of the money he had paid.
This decision will determine several other claims, in which the facts are precisely similar.

1865 21 Apr - The Manchester Guardian: Classified Ad – THE TALENT versus THE DAVENPORTS.
To-night and To-morrow Night, after the concert, there will b e a Dark Séance when Spurgeon will do the
Doctor, the Captain and the Colonel will do the Davenports in the cabinet. Gentlemen are invited to bring
their own ropes, Cummins and Hulley will attend and the tom-fool knot will be tested. Head-quarters
Crown. Little Joe in his chair.

1865 21 Apr - The Manchester Guardian: THE VOLUNTEER FETE AT LANCASTER -
Account of events - John Hulley managed several events of athletics, gymnastics, racing, leaping, &c.

1865 - Liverpool Olympic Festival held - organised by the Liverpool Athletic Club - John Hulley Honorary
Secretary. (source - wbsite of the North of England Athletic Association)

1865 - LIVERPOOL TRADES DIRECTORY
Hulley John Gentleman Rainhill

1865 03 Jun - The Porcupine THE OPENING OF THE GYMNASIUM
We have been inundated with letters, relative to the opening of the new gymnasium, each communic-
-ation containing much abuse of the directors in general,and Mr Hulley in particular. “Gymnasiarch,
Junior," says:- “Is this free England? Is this the 19th century, when a man is a man for all that, and can
double up. his perambulator, if he has a mind so to do? Why should we sons of labour, who are, toiling
and moiling all day, and are only too anxious to completely exhaust our muscles by attending the
Gymnasium, wait and hope for the opening of Mr Hulley's palatial residence in Myrtle-street? We are
told that the delay is caused by the determination of the directors to wait till the Prince of Wales visits
Liverpool, when he can formally open the Gymnasium. What, may I ask, Mr Editor, has the Prince of
Wales to do with us? Can he increase our chests one iota or improve our biceps by the breadth of an
inch? No. Her Majesty herself, I have also been informed, purposes coming down to preside at the
opening, and inaugurate the proceedings by having a bout at single-stick with the great Gymnasiarch
himself. However this may be, there is one fact that that must not be overlooked: we are panting for
exercise, and must have it."
Of course, we have but little to say upon this matter, which “Gymnasiarch, Junior," takes so much to
heart, but imagine that the Gymnasium is not opened for the simple reason that it is not finished. Mr
Hulley or one of the directors walk through it daily, it is true, but still that operation does not aid the
completion of the building.

1865 03 Jun - North Wales Chronicle - arrivals at the George Hotel, Bangor Ferry (incl.). Mr John Hulley, Liverpool

1865 29 Jul - North Wales Chronicle - Correspondence - Llandudno -
To the Editor of the North Wales Chronicle - Dear Sir, (incl.) For the last two or three years Mr Hulley has
written much on the question of bathing at Llandudno, and has, otherwise, interested himself very
greatly in the welfare of the town, and it would be ingratitude indeed, if such efforts, prompted by no
personal motives, were not handsomely recognized. Arise you dons in the place !, Llandudno never
was insensible of honour! Let the great Gymnasiarch see that we can admire his gratuitous efforts, if we
can do no more!. Mr H. must pardon, if the writer hereof has offended.
I enclose my name, ARGUS

1865 29 Jul - Cheshire Observer and Chester, Birkenhead, Crewe and North Wales Times - OLYMPIC FESTIVAL AT
LLANDUDNO -Mr Hulley seems to propagate the great idea of his life, physical education, wherever he
is placed. Last Saturday, every inhabitant and visitor to Llandudno visited the croquet ground to witness
an Olympic Festival, which had been arranged by Mr Hulley, and in which the youths staying and
residing at the watering place took part. Colonel Walmsley and Colonel M’Corquodale, were the judges
on the occasion. The Rev. W. Campbell, acted as a starter, and Mr Hulley took upon himself the part of
the referee. A number of gentlemen and had placed their names on the reward list, which included the
Hon. and Rev. Atherton Powys, the Hon. and Rev. Orlando Forester, Signor Gavazzi, and our townsman
Maurice Williams. The sports of Saturday embraced those usually adopted at each meeting, and the
festival was brought to a close on Monday by a grand swimming match in the bay. After this last
ceremony the prizes were delivering and several speeches made, Colonel Walmsley being one of the
chief oratorical contributors. He dwelt upon the advantages of gymnastic exercise, and Mr Hulley for
originating the Festival, and summed up his address by thanking that gentleman for the brave manner in
which he saved the life of a lady who was bathing in the day a few days back.

1865 12 Aug - The Porcupine MR HULLEY AND THE ABYSSINIAN CAPTIVES
It is now definitely settled that the Gymnasiarch of Liverpool is to proceed to Abyssinia, and demand
from King Theodorus the release of the captives at present in his dominions. We understand that Mr
Hulley will proceed at once, in the bathing costume that he made so popular at New Brighton and
Llandudno. He will make his first appearance before Theodorus going up a rope feet foremost, from the
top of which he will bound into the presence of the King and demand satisfaction. The King, it is
supposed, would instantly have Mr Hulley seized, and order his right foot and left hand to be cut off and
placed in the National Museum of the country. This has been stated to the Gymnasiarch, but he does
not display the slightest symptoms of fear. When asked how he would fix the rope on which he prop-
-osed performing, he answered - “Anywhere, anywhere!" and it was supposed that he had been reading
the “Bridge of Sighs." We trust that Mr Hulley will be successful in this his new undertaking, and that he
will not meet with a similar fate to Mr Bassam's messenger.

1865 22 Aug - Morning Post - NOVEL FETE AT LLANDUDNO-
A novel water fete, organised by Mr Hulley of Liverpool, took place at Llandudno on Saturday evening.
The whole of the houses facing the sea were lit up, and numbers of boat elegantly decorated, and filled
with ladies bearing coloured lampions formed a procession and sailed round the bay. The rocks
surrounding the town were brilliantly illuminated, and a carnival was held on the sands by thousands of
visitors carrying variegated lanterns of every possible hue.
During the procession, Mr and Mrs Howard Paul, who were in a boat displaying a Union Jack ingenious-
- ly composed of French lampions to represent the colours, sang "Rule Britannia,” the chorus being
taken up by thousands of voices. The night being favourable, the effect on the shore was brilliant in the
extreme, resembling the mimic Venetian fetes in the Bois-de-Boulogne, or the feasts of lanterns we read
of in Chinese fables.

1865 26 Aug - The Porcupine - MR HULLEY AND THE ABYSSINIAN CAPTIVES (From our own Correspondent)
Llandudno, Friday evening
As announced in the periodical which I have the honour to represent, Mr Hulley started on his mission to
King Theodorus last Monday, and, after much fatiguing travel has halted at the above place prior to
proceeding on his journey. The great Gymnasiarch, though somewhat harassed-looking, is apparently
hopeful of success in the difficult task he has undertaken. His costume is simple in the extreme, con-
-sisting of the bathing-dress in use at continental watering-places. He is undergoing an immense
course of training, passing his time in walking up and down the mountains in the district, or swimming
out to sea with nothing on, but a cigar in his mouth. He has, at an enormous cost, and after great
difficulty, secured a piece of the Atlantic cable, on which he will make his first appearance before King
Theodorus.
The little town of Llandudno has been one scene of revelry since the arrival of the Gymnasiarch: torch-
light processions, feasts of lanterns, and tourneys have taken place in his honour. Despite the enthus-
-iasm that has been displayed around him, the hero of the time is in no wise affected, walking about
with a calm dignity he ever displays -, just as he appeared in playing with the sawdust on the stage of
the Theatre Royal. Truly great men always have detractors, and there are people who call the Gym-
-nasiarch a perambulating advertisement. It is also asserted that St. Paul went mad with over study,
and that Mr John Hulley, the Gymnasiarch, displays symptoms of insanity, although produced from
quite a different cause. He has lately issued a circular respecting certain sports that are about to take
place at Llandudno, which displays symptoms of ingenious insanity that would give to qualified
physicians every right to cause him to be placed in a lunatic asylum. I will send you further particulars
of progress next week.

1865 26 Aug - North Wales Chronicle - LLANDUDNO - PENNY READINGS IN THE MUSIC HALL -VOTE OF THANKS
TO MR. HULLEY, &c.
As it was well known that the thanks of the town would be presented to Mr. Hulley for his active exertions
to promote its prosperity by providing Amusements, &c., a great many visitors were present, as well as
the ordinary residents.
The Chairman remarked to the company that Mr. Tomkinson had somehow made a slight mistake in
the programme, as he had substituted for Mr. Hulley’s name that of a “Visitor”. He then called upon Mr.
Hulley to deliver an address. (His address covers 193 lines of text and was mainly concerned with
bathing and the appropriate dress for each sex.)
Mr. Hulley was loudly cheered towards the conclusion of his address; but at first, a good many, and
especially a portion of the ladies, could not understand the drift of his remarks nor what would be likely
to be said next. When, however, they found themselves “safe” in his hands, they regained their serenity,
and joined the male portion of the audience in applauding.
VOTE OF THANKS TO MR. HULLEY
Mr. Thomas Parry, Tygwyn, then rose, and in very complimentary and flattering terms moved a vote of
thanks to Mr. Hulley, on behalf of the Board of Commissioners, of which Mr. Parry was the Chairman, for
his zeal and activity in doing everything which he possibly could to promote the interests of the town, Mr.
Parry then begged to propose similar vote of thanks on behalf of the town of Llandudno generally, for the
part he had taken in obtaining amusements for the townspeople and the visitors, and on the part of the
inhabitants, he begged to thank him for his kindness, and to heartily welcome him amongst them.
(Loud cheers.)
The Chairman then warmly thanked Mr. Hulley upon the same grounds. Mr. Fenton warmly seconded
the resolution moved by Mr. Parry, in an eloquent speech, on the benefits which Mr. Hulley had confer-
-red not only on the visitors to Llandudno but to the inhabitants as well. He proceeded to defend inno-
-cent amusements such as had been originated by Mr. Hulley, Col. Walmsley and Mr. Whitworth Jones,
and concluded by heartily seconding the resolution.
The Chairman then called upon te audience to testify their appreciation of the gratuitious efforts of Mr.
Hulley to cater for their amusement by giving him a hearty three-times-three. The company then all
stood up for several minutes hurrahed most lustily, and by clapping of hands. In fact the affair was quiet
an ovation.
When the cheering had subsided, Mr. Hulley rose and thanked the company in a feeling but brief
speech, for their kind appreciation of his services, which he was afraid they had over-rated. He did not
think he had done more than Col. Walmsley and Mr W. Jones had done.
A round of hearty cheers were then given for Col. Walmsley, and on the suggestion of the Chairman for
Mrs Walmsley. The same compliment was also paid to Mr. Whitworth Jones, who in reply said that Mr.
Hulley had originated everything, and that he had only assisted in carrying out his instructions.
The enthusiasm of the company during these proceedings was great, and shewed clearly that they were
not mere common-place compliments, but genuine expressions of grateful thanks.

1865 02 Sep - The Porcupine - MR HULLEY AND THE ABYSSINIAN CAPTIVES - (From our own Correspondent)
Llandudno, Friday evening
Still here! The bracing area of North Wales seems to have a fascination for the Gymnasiarch. Having
just written the word “gymnasiarch" brings to mind a very characteristic anecdote of the great man,
whose fortunes I am following and whose exploits I have to chronicle for you. He was wandering in a
secluded mountain fastness, in his bathing-dress, when he was suddenly accosted by a mercantile-
looking person, in drab inexpressibles, who said, “pardon me; but are you not the Gymnasiarch of
Liverpool?" “I," said the great man, whose deeds I am watching, “am the Gymnasiarch of the world.”
How like him, you will say when I tell you that, after thus replying, he rushed down the mountainside,
which is almost perpendicular, and plunged into the sea, where he wallowed for some hours. Was it not
grand, and like the man? The life of the English resident here is very monotonous, eating, drinking,
sleeping, and bathing form the chief amusement of my countrymen. The natives have, as I told you in
my last letter, been keeping the town in a constant state of illumination since the arrival of the Gymnas-
-iarch. Colonel Walmsley, the governor of the island, has shown everyone connected with the mission
every courtesy and has been instrumental in getting up a “Feast of Lanterns” in honour of our arrival.
We are all anxiously waiting to be once more on the march, and inwardly praying that the Gymnasiarch
may soon take it into his head to proceed with the difficult task he has undertaken.

1865 02 Sep - North Wales Chronicle - POETRY - A NEW DITTY ON NUDITY!

SUGGESTED BY A RECENT SPEECH ON BATHING

Who’s Hulley? No matter: to ask would be rude,
There may be a thousand, though not of one brood,
There’s one who, with decency deeply imbued,
Thinks lords of creation should never bathe nude.

To ladies, moreover, in delicate way,
Our anti-nude Hulley has something to say;
He thinks that more comely and nymph-like they’ll be,
If they all “wear the brecks” when they bathe in the sea,

So all of ye most lovely, ye golden hair’d girls,
Ye jewels of households, ye family pearls,
Do order, I beg, ere next season’s begun,
The Hulley sea-garment from Moses and Son!

To gentlemen also I hope that enough
Has been said to deter them from bathing in buff;
I’m sure that they’ll dip with more credit and fun,
In the Hulley sea-vestments of Moses and Son.

Now those who, on land, in the “Lancers” delight,
Might dance in the ocean with proper dress tight;
Ye masters of dancing, pray list to my plea -
Won’t someone compose the “Marines” for the sea?

Oh! think of a polka with glorious Fanny,
Quadrilles with Louisa, a schottische with Annie!
Oh! think of a gallop upon the fine sand,
With Hulley, well covered up, leading the Band!

Cold chicken and ham might be laid on the beach,
A knife, fork, and plate, and some sherry for each;
The belle, too, might come in La Zouaverine
For an ice on the steps of the bathing machine!

Then some one should perch on a hillock of sand,
And raising his glass, all attention command -
“Good bathers, a toast, with three cheers if you can,
Here’s to Hulley, the great anti-nudity man!”

“Mr Hulley, I bows; Mr Hulley, your health;
Good fortune be yours with unlimited wealth;
Your speech was delightful for all here agree
That decency’s quite the right thing in the sea!”

Mr Hulley would rise and no doubt he would lay
His hand on his buttoned-up heart and would say,-
“The speech which I made before old age and youth,
Contained I may say but the nakedest truth;
I’ve often been shocked and ready to cry,
At what I have seen with my own naked eye;
Naked lights are unsafe but of all human faults-
Excuse me, I find I’m engaged for this waltz!”

Believe me, ye mothers with daughters no end,
Mr Hulley’s indeed your most valuable friend:
Promiscuous bathing is best you’ll agree,
Since your belles may find beaux ’midst the waves of the sea.

Those girls who are charming in large crinoline,
Will handsomer look in the Zouaverine,
And think of the heart that a beauty most rack,
With her glorious hair down her glorious back!

O anti-buff Hulley, a blessing on thee,
Great bathing reformer, Beau Nash of the sea,
I swear that Ill ne’er indulge in a bride,
Whom I woo not and win at the height of the tide!

Oceanic proposals we’ll have ev’ry week,
And salt-water blushes on ev’ry young cheek,
Marriage settlements mad on the back of a shark,
And Ma’s -in-law rated at low water mark!

CHORUS OF BATHERESSES

Yes, cheer him, friends, sisters and mothers,
No slander our honor can sully;
We may bathe with beaux, husbands, and brothers,
If only we dress á la Hulley!

CHORUS OF BATHERS

Yes, cheer him kings, princes, and earls,
No slander our honor can sully.
We may bathe near those exquisite girls,
If only we dress á la Hulley!

Rhyl, August 33, (sic) R. St. J. C.


1865 06 Sep - Derby Mercury - Novel Fete at Llandudno -
A novel water fete, organised by Mr Hulley, of Liverpool, took place at Llandudno , on Saturday evening.
The whole of the houses facing the sea were lit up, and numbers of boats, elegantly decorated, and filled
with ladies bearing coloured lampions, formed a procession and sailed around the bay. The rocks
surrounding the town were brilliantly illuminated, and a carnival was held on the sands by thousands of
visitors carrying variegated lanterns of every possible hue. During the procession, Mr and Mrs Howard
Paul, who were in a boat, displayed a union jack, ingeniously composed of French lampions to represent
the colours, sang “Rule Britannia” the chorus being taken up by thousands of voices. The night being
favourable, the effect from the shore was brilliant in the extreme, resembling the mimic Venetian fetes in
the Bois de Bologne, or the feasts of lanterns we read in Chinese fables.

1865 14 Sep - Bradford Observer -THE MERMAIDS QUADRILLE -
Llandudno, a now famous watering-place on the Welsh coast, has distinguished itself of late by a
succession of outdoor fetes, torch-light dances al fresco, fancy balls, Olympic festivals, carnivals, bay
illuminations, croquet matches, etc, all of which have been improvised by the visitors, with Mr Hulley
(the gymnasiarch of Liverpool,) as their guiding spirit, and carried out with remarkable spirit and
success.
But the season will be chiefly remembered for the reform which has been effected in the same agency,
in the system of bathing in the open sea. By the introduction and almost general adoption of the Zonave
costume, ladies and gentlemen of the same family or friendly circle are enabled to mingle as freely in
the ocean, as when upon the parade. The art of swimming and diving has been acquired with
remarkable proficiency by a large number of ladies, and the crowds who watched the evolutions from
the beach readily concede its strict propriety, and even gracefulness, compared with the clumsy and
often indelicate exhibition presented by the ladies "jumping in sacks," so long tolerated at English
watering-places.
On Saturday morning last, while a large party of ladies were thus disporting in the sea, with fathers,
brothers, and trends, Mr Hulley proposed "a quadrille." "Oh, by all means," was the reply, and in less
than five minutes the whole party had arranged themselves in a double set with top and side-couples
and the quadrille was actually swum through successfully -- the ladies’ chains being especially
graceful. - Globe. (also in the York Herald Sep 14 1865)

1865 20 Sep - Morning Post - BATHING AT LLANDUDNO.
Mr John Hulley, of this town, has effected a complete revolution in the system of bathing at Llandudno.
The exhibition which frequently take place at various sea-bathing towns in this country have long been
considered a disgrace to the age, but at Llandudno these have now altogether been suppressed, and
the man who broke through a now established rule was summoned before the magistrates, at Mr
Hulley's instance, on Friday last. The offence was that of obtruding in a state of nudity into the vicinity of
the ladies’ bathing district, and it was visited with a penalty of 40s. costs, which the public will no doubt
think not too much for the offence itself, nor too light to act as a warning to deter others. Mr Hulley, in
introducing his system, met with considerable opposition at first, but the advantages have been shown
to be so undoubted that visitors to Llandudno now almost universally adopt his view.

1865 22 Sep - Liverpool Daily Post - THE “PALL MALL GAZETTE” ON MR. HULLEY
We read in the Pall Mall Gazette the following:- “We are happy to received that the lay sermons we have
been preaching on decency in bathing are beginning to fructify. On Friday last a man was summoned
before the magistrates at Llandudno for bathing in a state of nudity in the vicinity of the ladies’ bathing
quarters. He was fined 4s and costs. The custom of bathing decently draped met with considerable
opposition at first; but Mr. Hulley, the proprietor of the bathing establishment at Llandudno, has
proved its advantages to be so undoubted that it is now willingly adopted by every visitors to the place.”
It should be understood that our contemporary is mistaken in attributing to Mr. Hulley a proprietary
interest in Llandudno . We believe the useful enthusiasm he has shewn this summer at the pretty
watering-place has been wholly disinterested and in the character of a private gentleman casually
sojourning at the place, but too much devoted to the spread of his ideas as to bathing fashions to miss
so good an opportunity of advancing them. The summoning of the indecent bather was a bold stroke
well made.

1865 23 Sep - LLANDUDNO - A LADY’S SWIMMING RACE.-
Now that literary advertisements are making the “Ladies’ mile” a household word, some readers will
probably be interested to hear of a very novel racecourse, over which a unique contest took place on
Monday morning last. Mr. Huley, the gymnasiarch of Liverpool, who has for a long time occupied
himself in the improvement of the English style of bathing, with a view to its assimilation to that
prevalent on the continent, has spent the last few months at Llandudno, and vailing himself of the
adoption by many of the fair visitors of that watering-place of the Zouaveraine dress, which he has so
perseveringly advocated in the press, in society, and on the platform, has taught upwards of 200 ladies
to swim.
On the day above-named, Mr. Hulley offered a prize to the best lady swimmer in a 50 yards race. The
result was a very spirited competition, in which eight young ladies took part. The running was excellent,
and the speed remarkably good. The prize was won by the daughter of an eminent London banker,
aged only eight years. The match took place very early, in order that any excitement on the subject
might be avoided; but the incident is a remarkable proof of the interest takin in swimming amongst
ladies at the present time, and of the ease with which proficiency may be gained, for all the comp-
-etitors in the race had but recently acquired the accomplishment.

1865 23 Sep - North Wales Chronicle - CONWAY - PETTY SESSIONS, Friday, Sept .15 -
Before Rd. Davies and W.F. Chapman, Esqs. Mr Parker, a visitor from Manchester, was summoned
upon information received from Mr. John Hulley and Major Thompson, of the 6th Regiment, for having,
on the 9th inst., bathed in close proximity to the Ladies’ Bathing Machines, in a state of nudity, and
exposing his person in a disgraceful manner.
The witnesses present to prove the case, were Mr. Hulley, Major Thompson, and Mr. Watkins. After a
patient hearing by the Magistrates, the defendant, who did not appear, was fined the full penalty of 40s
and costs, and in default, one month’s imprisonment. At the close of the case, the Magistrates express-
-ed their thanks to the gentlemen who had come forward in the cause of propriety, and also stated that it
was their intention to inflict the full penalty in every similar case, adding that they considered it the duty
of the Llandudno Commissioners to pay every attention to the matter, and the Chairman expressed his
personal obligations to Mr. Hulley for the trouble he had taken in bringing the matter before the Court.

1865 10 Oct - Liverpool Mercury Correspondence - A Testimony on to Mr Hulley.
To the Editors of the Liverpool Mercury - Gentleman, Our town now possesses one of the finest gymnas-
- iums in the world, for which we are principally indebted to Mr Hulley. I paid a visit there on Tuesday
evening, and was quite surprised at the elegance of the building. It is well lighted and ventilated, and the
gymnastics are of such a varied character that I do not wonder that it is so well patronised. A few of the
athletes appear in white flannel trousers and shirts, with cricket shoes, which gives the place quite a
charming appearance. During the evening the members are instructed by Mr Hulley in the art of
practising with dumb-bells, clubs, etc. There is also a gallery for strangers, I recommend my youthful
readers to join this gymnasium, for I do not think they can possibly find a more pleasant way of spending
an evening.
Mr Hulley deserves the warmest praise for his exertions, for it is all owing to him that the establishment
has been raised. We can't thank him too much, and I think the best way for the members and their
friends to show their gratitude would be to make him a suitable testimonial. I should be happy to join in
any undertaking to that effect, and I think a great many other members will not refuse their mite for such a
praiseworthy object. Yours etc
An Admirer of Myrtle-Street Gymnasium
Grove-street, October 5.

1865 23 Oct - Liverpool Daily Post - THE NEW GYMNASIUM IN MYRTLE-STREET.
Never, perhaps, were truer words uttered than those delivered by the Rev. Nevison Loraine yesterday
(Sunday) week, before one of the largest audiences that ever as-sembled in Trinity Church, to the effect
that not-withstanding the progress of our civilisation, and our increased acquaintance with sanitary laws,
no subject is more neglected by the great masses of the people, and not only by them, but also by those
whose superior educational advantages should have brought so important a matter before their consid-
-eration, and thus have wakened their interest in its behalf, than that of physical education. Could an old
Greek or Roman rise from his grave and see how little progress has been made in this direction - rather
let it be said how the culture of the Thespian and Olympian Games has been disregarded in modern
times - how far we are behind him in the development of physical powers - his astonishment must be
great indeed.
If it were rightly understood that the pursuits of the gymnast tended to be something more useful, more
noble, and more practical than amusement we opine that they would be more generally followed. What
further says the rev. gentleman whose words have already been quoted, and whose opinion upon most
subjects is worthy of serious consideration? - “Christianity not only concerns itself with the soul of man -
with his spiritual life; that is its first concern, and of supreme importance; but it seeks also to promote
intellectual advancement, and physical well-being. Christianity deems nothing below the range of its
attention that can exalt, ennoble, and invigorate man; fitting him more fully for all the varied duties of his
daily life. And when it is considered how close a connection there is between physical health and vigour
and mental energy - yes, and also with moral tone - I feel I am only truly interpreting the spirit of that
divine and comprehensive religion whose minister I am, when I urge upon you to give proper attention
to physical education.”
Surely such a theme as this is becoming the Christian minister, and if more generally discoursed upon
from the pulpit must awaken the attention of enlightened persons, and thereby be attended with happy
results. But looked at even from a lower point of view, physical culture acts as a corrective to the sedent-
-ary life which a commercial community are apt to be betrayed into, and also affords most desirable rules
and inculcates most admirable habits by which to regulate the human body. This point was dilated upon
by Mr. Hughes, M.P., a few days since at the Liverpool Institute, on the occasion of his delivering the
prizes to the successful competitors at the recent University examinations. It will be doubtless borne in
mind that he urged the directors of the Liverpool Institute to look still further to the physical requirements
of the pupils who attend those schools, and to advise them to effect an arrangement with Mr. Hulley,
whereby the lads could frequently resort to the building which now rears its head in Myrtle-street.
This advice we feel sure will not be thrown away. It will readily be admitted that athletic exercises tend to
strengthen the sinews of the limbs, to add fleetness, agility, suppleness, endurance, power, and activity
to the man, and grace, dignity, health, and happiness to the woman. Further it may safely be asserted
that in proportion to the robustness of the body, will be the quantity and quality of the mental powers.
Such being the case it is of the utmost importance that the example set us by the sons of Greece
and Rome; and later still by Robin Hood and his merry men, should be more extensively followed in
these days.
Happily there is a tendency in our good old town to revive this excellent training of the ancients. One of
the principal and firmest adherent of the doctrine of physical education in these times is our townsman
Mr. John Hulley. This gentleman in fact may be said to be the father of the athletes. His experience in
Continental gymnasia was very extensive, and led him some fourteen years since to establish an
institution of this kind in London, known as the Roscoe Club.” Later still he opened a gymnasium
at Huyton, near Liverpool, which was attended with considerable success, and it will be well remember-
-ed that some three years since he fitted up a gymnasium in Bold-street, where, by his activity, his zeal
for the cause, his experience and his tact, he gathered around him some 800 or 900 young men, who,
together with some of his other gymnastic friends formed themselves into the “Liverpool Athletic Club.”
Mr. Hulley also formed a large class of young ladies, who, under his careful training, in a very short time
experienced the beneficial results in improved health and strength.
From this time the public mind was directed to this subject; and we have the authority of Sir John Jones
for saying that the example set by Liverpool induced the military authorities to establish athletic clubs at
Aldershot, Curragh, Colchester; and in fact at almost every depot. This is indeed very gratifying, and we
sincerely trust that ere long we shall find gymnasia established throughout the kingdom, so that the rising
generation will realise the full benefits which they are so highly calculated to afford.
Unfortunately Mr. Hulley ceased at the end of about twelve months to have the control of the latter institut-
-ion; and the Rotunda building being sold for other purposes, an effort was made to see if another
gymnasium could not be provided, which might be equal to the increasing numbers of the Athletic
Society. Judging from the success of the Rotunda Gymnasium, and the large receipts from subscribers
during its short career, Mr. Hulley believed that if the proper assistance could be secured an institution
might be founded which would be not only a great benefit to the public, but also be remunerative to those
who gave their money to it.
In January 1864, a meeting of the promoters was held in the Town-hall, and it was resolved that a comp-
-any be formed; that £10,000 should be raised in £10 shares, and that a gymnasium should be erected
worthy of the town of Liverpool. The whole of the shares were taken up by upwards of 120 gentlemen,
and the first call of £5 was made. A plot of land in Myrtle-street, containing 1,450 square yards was
purchased for a sum of £2,539, on Corporation lease. The plans were offered to public competition, and
the successful competitor was Mr. Walter Scott, of Liverpool. The contract for the whole building, which
includes a handsome stone front, was taken by Messrs. Nicholson and Ayre for £7,060, and they bound
themselves to finish the interior, the grand hall , and the school of arms, by the 1st of November, and the
whole building by the 21st December. It will thus be seen that the matter was energetically taken in hand;
and the announcement that a new gymnasium was to be erected by the Liverpool Gymnasium Comp-
-any, of which Mr. J. R. Jeffrey, who was first consulted in the matter, and Mr. C. P. Melly were the lead-
-ing promoters, took the town with pleasurable surprise.
The foundation stone of this building was laid with great pomp and ceremony by the ex-Mayor (Mr.
Charles Mozley), the chairman of the board of directors, on the afternoon of the 18th July, 1864, in the
presence of a large crowd of spectators, a considerable proportion of whom were ladies. A bottle,
containing a number of coins, and copies of newspapers of the day, being deposited in a cavity of the
stone, the latter sealed with a brass plate, bearing the following inscription:-
“The foundation-stone of this building, the Liverpool Gymnasium, was laid on the 18th
day of July, 1864, by Charles Mozley, Esq., Mayor of Liverpool. Directors, Charles
Mozley, Esq., chairman; Thomas Avison, Esq., Thomas Brocklebank, Esq., Hugh
Finlay, Esq., S. R. Graves, Esq., T. F. Grimsdale, Esq., M.D., James R. Jeffrey, Esq.,
Charles Langton, Esq., W. H. Manifold, Esq., Brandon Mogley, Esq., Samuel G. Rath-
-bone, Esq., Robert Topping Steele, Esq., John Johnson Stitt, Esq., Thomas R. Stol-
-terfoht, Esq., Henry Ziegler, Esq., Alfred Holt, Esq., hon. treasurer; Charles P. Melly,
hon. secretary; Walter Scott, Esq., architect; John Hulley, Esq., gymnasiarch; and
Nicolson and Ayre, builders.”
The enterprise was one of the most remarkable and promising which had been for a long series of
years commenced in Liverpool. great prosperity attended the company, in which were enrolled a large
number of our leading men, who were engaged in an undertaking that well deserved their support.
True to their promise, the contractors bid fair to finish their work by the time specified; and on Monday,
the 30th instant, we hope to see the building - which is one-third larger than the gymnasium commenc-
-ed about the same time by a similar company at King’s Cross, London, and as far as we know the
largest institution of the kind in the world - opened by the Right Hon. Lord Stanley. the building has an
imposing appearance, and its handsome frontage (94 feet), and commanding height will at once at-
-tract the admiration of the passers-by. Surrounded as it is by an unusual number of handsome build-
-ings, such, for instance, as the Philharmonic Hall, an d the Myrtle-street Baptist Chapel, the neighbour-
- hood will be considerably im proved by this latest design of architecture. Mr Walter Scott entered into
the work con amore, and, while he has executed the same to the entire satisfaction of the company, has
added another lasting proof to the many which already exist in this town of his skill as an architect.
As already stated, the site of the building occupies 1,450 square yards. On the principal floor, on the
level of the ground, are the entrance hall, 12 feet wide, gentlemen’s rooms, committee room, ladies’
room, bathrooms for ladies, bathrooms for gentlemen, lavatories, storerooms, professor’s rooms, office,
and the gymnasium proper - a noble apartment, 105 feet long, 75 feet wide, an d 45 feet high. There
are twelve dressing rooms attached. There is a wide gallery at two sides and one end of the gymnas-
-ium, generally used for the various exercises, and intended for spectators on grand occasions. In
addition to the floor space, there is a space of 105 feet long by 28 feet wide, provided in the roof for
trapeze and other exercises requiring and imparting steadiness and nerve.
On the first floor there are the school of arms, a fine room, 50 feet long, 27 feet wide, and 15 feet in
height; an armoury, dressing room, and porter’s apartments, and in the towers storerooms, tanks, and
porter’s rooms. The basement contains workrooms, cellars, apparatus room, &c. There are two
separate main stair-cases, and the rooms for the sexes are completely detached. There are handsome
arcades between the school of arms and the gymnasium, connecting them, and adding to the visa and
general effect. The windows are at the sides and ends, close to the roof, so that the walls are left free for
ornament and for fixing the apparatus. The light being admitted from so great a height, an air of privacy
and seclusion is imparted to the gymnasium. The roof is constructed in a peculiar though simple and
effective manner to meet the novel requirements of a gymnasium, and the building is warmed by hot
water apparatus.
The elevation towards Myrtle-street is in the Italian style, with much of a French character, and consists
mainly of a low centre, with towers at either end 60 feet high. This arrangement is very suitable and
desirable for street architecture, in which building generally touches building in straight flat lines, varied
only by trifling unequal heights and slightly varied windows. In this case the full sides as well as the
fronts of the towers are seen, imparting a picturesqueness and solidity which cannot be obtained from
flat surfaces more or less slightly recessed. This elevation is wholly executed with rubbed sandstone of
the best quality and colour, and is comprised of a few simple and striking features, easily understood.
Internally the building is fitted up with all the requirements of a first-class gymnasium. The visitor will
naturally be attracted by the complete network of appliances which are provided for the use of the pupils.
The roof of the building is almost hid from view by thousands of feet of rope, which are so curiously
constructed as to baffle all attempts at description. At the other end of the gymnasium proper is a very
good design of a fort, which not only serves as a useful appendage, but also imparts a novel feature to
the whole. From this fort are suspended scaling ladders, and ropes, the use of which will at once be
apparent. When the summit of the fort is reached a pleasant promenade is provided, where the
gymnast lingers for a while to survey the animating scene beneath and to cool himself after the arduous
task he has just performed. A few feet in front, and just in the centre of this construction, is a small target,
at which javelins are thrown, from which it will be seen that means are afforded for cultivating steadi-
-ness of arm and keenness of sight as well as strength and muscularity of body. It will not fail to be
noticed that the greatest economy has been observed in laying out the building, or it is impossible to
turn the eye in any direction without seeing appliances of every description, the uses of which will
puzzle the uninitiated. These have been erected under the personal superintendence of Mr. Hulley, to
whom we refer the reader for that explanation which we from obvious reasons do not pretend to offer.
That gentleman is always at his post, and judging from the courtesy he invariably manifests, we feel
sure the inquirer will obtain the fullest information. In addition to the trapeze, the dumb bell exercises,
running, jumping, climbing, and wrestling, the directors have lately entered into an engagement with Mr.
James Mace, the well-known pugilist, to give lessons in the “noble art of boxing,” and have also retained
the services of Mons. Du Bercy, to instruct the pupils in broad sword and single stick exercises, of which
he is a perfect master.
Although, as has already been stated, the institution will not be formally opened until the 30th instant, it
has virtually been ready for the reception of pupils for some weeks past. Already about 500 subscrip-
-tions have been paid, and every week witnesses a large addition to the number. The most favourable
opportunity for visiting the building is by gaslight when a very animated brilliant, and effective scene
presents itself. The large hall is lighted principally from the side by means of a long gas pipe which runs
at the top of the walls, some few feet from the roof, from one end of the building to the other. The lights
are so arranged to ensure the upmost safety, and at the same time to prevent any excessive heat being
experienced by those in the net-work to which allusion has been made.
The pupils commence their exercises precisely at 8 o’clock, up to which time they are at liberty to enjoy
themselves in the manner most congenial to themselves. At that time, however, the different classes
are formed by Mr. Hulley, who, after taking up his position in the centre gallery, keeps each class hard at
work for about a quarter of an hour. Then they return to their former diversions, all of which have the
same object in view, namely, the full development of the physical powers, It is remarkable with what
zest the gymnasts enter upon the work, and notwithstanding our strong belief in the utility of physical
education, we confess that we were not prepared for the extraordinary results which presented
themselves on Saturday last.
Out of the large number of young men in the hall there was scarcely one to be found who gave evidence
of the inroads that too frequently are made upon the constitution by reason of the sedentary occupations
in which the greater portion of their lives is necessarily spent. The majority appeared brawny, stout, thick
limbed, broad-chested, muscular, flat-chested, and prematurely decrepit young man was a rare ex-
-ception. Perhaps here and there could be seen such an one, but on making enquiries, we found that
they were only novices, who in time will no doubt overcome their awkward-ness of gait, and will have
their pale and sickly visages changed for a robust, healthy complexion. The best wish we can express
to those who (if there is to be any) are prejudiced against athletic exercises is that the should visit the
gymnasium any night in the week, when conviction will be forced upon them more strongly than any
argument we could advance in their favour. It is gratifying to find that the public are taking great interest
in this undertaking as evinced by the large numbers who nightly attend the building. The galleries,
which are very comfortable and commodious, are always filled with ladies and gentlemen, and no
doubt as the gymnasium becomes better known, a still greater demand will be made for admission.
Among the visitors on Saturday night was Sir John Jones with a party of ladies, who were accommod-
-ated with seats in the centre gallery. The opening ceremony on Monday next is expected to be a very
brilliant affair.

1865 28 Oct - Porcupine report p256 - Mr. Hulley's Temple - detailed decription of the new Liverpool Gymansium -
manager Mr Hulley the Liverpool Gymnasiarch.

1865 06 Nov - Annals of Liverpool incl New Gymnasium, in Myrtle Street, inaugurated by Lord Stanley, Nov 6

1865 07 Nov - The Liverpool Mercury :
The formation of the National Olympian Association (reprinted in Minds, Bodies and Souls - An Anthology
of the Olympic Heritage Network by Dr. Don Anthony - ps16,17).
An inaugural meeting was held at the Liverpool Gymnasium, Myrtle Street.
Present:
Mr. John Hulley of Liverpool Chairman;
Mr. William Mitchell, Fearness Hall, near Manchester;
Dr. Brookes, Much Wenlock;
Mr. Phillips, Shrewsbury;
Mr. E.G. Ravenstein, president of the German Gymnastic Society, London;
Mr. Murray, London;
Mr, Ambrose Lee, Mechanics' Institution, Manchester;
Mr. Keeling, honorary secretary of the Athletic Society;
Mr. J.B. Lee, member of the Athletic Society

1865 07 Nov - The Times - LORD STANLEY on PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Last evening with Lord Stanley formally opened the Liverpool new Gymnasium. He was received with
applause, and addressed the assembly as follows: -
In proceeding to open this gymnasium, which I believe to be, in point of size, of arrangements, and of its
fittings, one of the most perfect yet established anywhere in Europe, I need not trouble you with more
than a few introductory observations. You probably know its history, as well as I do. You know that in
the main it owes its existence to the perseverance and energy of a townsman of yours, - I mean, our
friend Mr Melly. It was mainly by his efforts, aided by those of a few supporters as zealous as himself,
that the requisite sum of £10,000 was raised for its construction; and I think it is creditable to Liverpool
that such an amount could be raised, without thought of profit to the contributors, for such a purpose. I
say, without thought of profit, for I believe that those who have invested in it most largely will be the first
to tell you that, though for the sake of the example as an encouragement to others, they would be glad
to see an ample return, yet, so far as their personal interests are concerned, every one of them will be
perfectly satisfied, if the concern only pays its way; and that it will pay its way I think you have every
reason to expect, from the very brief statement of facts which I shall give.
The total cost has been under a £14,000, of which £10,000 has been raised by shares, and it remaining
£4000 by a mortgage on the building. The yearly expenses, including interest, are calculated not to
exceed £1000; and since the returns for the first six months are £700, with the arrangements hardly
completed, and the whole plan still untried, I think there is no reasonable doubt of the institution being
self-supporting. Now, I lay some stress on that, not for the sake of the thing itself. Liverpool is rich
enough to pay both for its pleasures, and its wants, but because the experiment is new. I am not aware
that it has been, or is being tried on an equally large scale anywhere else in the United Kingdom, except
in Edinburgh; and if it can be made to work, there is no reason why it should not work equally well in
every large town throughout the country. I hear it said, and I believe it is true that in Manchester they are
only waiting to see the result and if that result being what we expect a similar building will very soon be
set on foot there. I will mentioned, before leaving that part of the subject, that the subscribers for evening
attendance are 500, who paid one pound each for six months, and one pound 10 shillings for the year.
There are in addition, other subscribers at a higher rate, entitled to daily admission,. The number of
these last, as yet is not great, 60 or 70 I believe, but is increasing daily, and there is yet a third class,
young lads chiefly, for whom the place is open on certain days of the week and special training provided.
Of the arrangements I need say nothing. You can judge of them for yourselves, but I congratulate the
managers upon having in Mr Hulley, a director, who is working, not merely for the salary which he earns,
and which they will be the first to admit is a very inadequate recompense for his labour, but who is work-
- ing out a very real and enthusiastic interest in the business which he is employed to do.
And now one word as to the object, or rather the objects which the promoters have in view. Many people
look on a gymnasium - a place of teaching, that is, for athletic exercises - as though it were a yacht club,
or a chess club, or an Alpine club - a thing, which is a hobby to a few individuals, and which others join
for amusement, or because it is a fashion, or because it helps to pass the time. Now, if it were only that,
though I should say nothing against it, and though I should think the promoters had made a very sensible
investment of their spare cash and their spare time, I should hardly have considered that it required or
deserved the formality of a ceremonial opening, and assuredly I should not have done that which is to
me is never perfectly agreeable - I should not have stood up to make a speech on the subject. But I
should hold that it is far more than a mere place of amusement.
We, in Europe, and more especially, we in England, are entering on a new phase of social existence.
Already more than half the population of England reside in towns. With peace maintained, and with an
increase, or even a continuance, of our present rate of prosperity, the population will in a few years be far
greater. But I need not appeal to general statistics. We who have lived to middle age in this neighbour-
-hood - we who have seen the great city extending from the New Docks of Garston, on the one side, to
the Sandhills of Bootle on the other, - who have watched the gradual disappearance of the green fields,
and the spread in their place of streets and lanes, and who have daily before their eyes along the lines of
villas which spring up at every adjoining railway station - at Broad-green, at Burton, and at Roby - should
require no proof from books or Parliamentary returns to tell them how rapid and how continuous is the
increase of that part of the population engaged in some one of the many branches of commerce, and
destined, for the most part, to sedentary pursuits in crowded localities.
What is happening here it is, though not quite to any equal extent, happening also a great part of Eng-
-land. But we all know also something else; we know that, even under the greatly improved sanitary
conditions of the last few years - and let me say, in passing, that it is nothing less than a shame to us
that, notwithstanding all that has been affected - and it is a great deal - Liverpool should stand nearly
highest on the death-rate of England - even after all that has been done, all that drainage, and water
supply, and wide streets, and parks can do, urban life is never so healthy as that which is passed in the
pure air and active pursuits of the country.
What are the causes of that difference? I am not know speaking of the labouring and artisan class, with
whom I admit at once. this institution has little to do. But if I come to the class above them - to the class
of clerks, of young men engaged in shops, of all whose days are past sitting on stools, in offices often
close and crowded - and I might take in a higher class still - I say at once, that one cause one great
cause of feeble constitution and depressed energies is the absence of bodily or muscular exertion,
combined with the pressure of what is in some degree of mental occupation - though often mental
occupation of a very mechanical kind. Of course, habit will do much. Of course, also, individual
constitutions vary. But every medical man, and everyone who has studied sanitary matters, knows, that
life passed within four walls during the week, with only the variety of a walk on Saturdays and Sundays,
will very seldom be a healthy life in the true sense. For, by “healthy”, we mean, or ought to mean, not the
mere absence of disease, not the mere capacity to go through an ordinary day's work, but that state in
which existing in itself is felt to be an enjoyment, in which all simple and natural pleasures are apprecia -
-ted, and the little every-day anxieties of our businesses sit lightly upon us. If there are, as is undoubted-
-ly the case, classes amongst us who run all to muscle and with whom brain never gets a chance of
being developed - navvies, ploughmen, and the like - so there are classes who seem to have no further
idea of using their muscles than is implied in walking to their place of business (and even they very often
use an omnibus to save time), and whose upmost bodily exertion is driving a pen for hours together and
handling a knife and fork at dinner.
Now, I say, and I hope without offence, that in the latter class the human result is, to my mind, hardly
more satisfactory than in the former. Take your navvy, and you have a fine example of animal develop-
-ment; but I am afraid you have very little else. Take your clerk, shut up from year's end to year’s end;
you have a quick active brain, the nervous system ever excitable, but the animal frame feeble and badly
developed. I respect him. I am very sorry for him. The fault is not his, but that of the life he leads. But I
say of him that he is not, physically speaking, the stuff out of which we wish the middle classes of Eng-
-lishmen to be made. If it were possible -- which I fear it hardly is - to trace the history of families in
detail, we should be startled to find how many of those engaged in purely sedentary pursuits die out,
and how the gaps have to be filled up, year after year, from the hardier rural population.
There are other evils of a purely sedentary life to which in this company I can scarcely advert; one is
that physical feebleness leads to depression. That depression may be relieved by the easy and
always accepted resource of drink, and then, sooner or later, we know the end. In other respects, too,
medical men and all who have who have studied health questions, will understand the very vague
phrases I have used. It is not easy to overrate the degree to which habits of mortality, among men
under middle age, are connected with healthy physical conditions, and, above all, with sufficient bodily
exercise. Well, then, I think we shall agree as to this proposition, that in Liverpool, as in all great towns,
there exists a class exceedingly numerous and yearly increasing, for whom, in the course of their
business, no opportunity of bodily training or exercise is provided. Can they make such opportunities
for themselves? Of course, in a certain sense, they can. There is no physical impossibility in it. But our
climate is damp and dull, her streets are not attractive, and perhaps one of the least entertaining of
human occupations is that which is termed “taking a constitutional” on the high road. There is,
also, the expenditure of time. An establishment like this gives exercise in a concentrated form, and its
rooms will be open - will probably most frequented, - in the evening - that is, at the time of day when
during several months in the year out-door nature, especially in the town, is not very agreeable. So
much I have to say of the uses of this building.
Only one word more. I do not fear that support will be wanted. Those who have watched the progress
of the movement tell me that among the young men who take these exercises many do so with the kind
of enthusiasm, which is quite remarkable. Still, I find no fault with that. We all like to see men take up
with a thing in earnest, whether it be work or play. But to those who are keenest about it I would offer
one word of warning. Recollect that it is a thing that may be easily overdone. Don't ride a hobby too
far. The object - the natural object of a training of this kind is not to make athletes out of men who have
not to live by their muscles, but to develop sound health and manly constitutions.
His Lordship concluded by expressing an earnest wish for the success of the institution.

1865 07 Nov - The Manchester Guardian: LORD STANLEY ON PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
Account of his speech at the new gymnasium in Myrtle Street Liverpool.

1865 11 Nov - The Porcupine - THE FOUNDER OF THE GYMNASIUM
Lord Stanley proved last Monday that there is something after all in blood and breeding; for he did what
your Liverpool flag swells never did and are ever likely to do- recognize as a gentleman a man who
takes “a salary.” Lord Stanley knows what enthusiasm is, although he has very little of it; and he
perceives in Mr Hulley, not “a queer person we've got at the gymnasium, and whom none of us can
manage” but a man who, having devoted himself soul and body to what he believes to be the
promotion of the highest truth, and the inculcation of the soundest habits, and having had success
throughout England far above any previously achieved in his department of effort, did himself establish,
and is the be-all and end-all of, the Liverpool Gymnasium, which is, in some respects, the finest in
Europe. Its failings are no fault of Mr Hulley's. The bad taste of some of its details have, if common
report is to be trusted, been contrary to his wish, and the only difficulties in its future are likely to arise
from Mr Hulley not being treated with confidence and deference which are his due.
Be it distinctly understood that we speak from no private information. The hand that pens these lines
has not been grasped in the gymnasiarch’s vice since the gymnasium was built; the writer has never
been within its precincts, and he knows only what people are saying out of doors. The public, and the
shareholders in the gymnasium, particularly will be surprised if we tell them that Mr Hulley - who alone
of all concerned knows anything practically of the business, is actually held a greater distance then than
an ordinary secretary, and does not attend the meetings of the board. This is no injury to Mr Hulley; it
will probably save him from softening of the brain., which many examples in Liverpool show is a
contagious complaint. But it is a great injury to the company - so great an injury that, unless than the
nature of things has lately altered, it is exceedingly likely to jeopardise its success.
The effect of Mr Hulley not being included in the list of the Mayor’s guests on the day of the gymnasium
opening was only an additional slight. It gladdened our hearts when Lord Stanley virtually rebuked
directors by referring to Mr Hulley as one who was receiving no real recompense for the functions he
was performing, and who deserved to be highly esteemed for his works’ sake. Those who know Mr
Hulley, are aware that, besides these claims to respect, he is a gentleman, and the son of one; has
moved in society, which merchants are not likely to reach; and acquits himself in society, not only
unexceptionally, but in such a manner as to render him a welcome and notable guest. However, these
are considerations with which we have little to do. It needs no prophet, and no Lord Stanley, to tell us
that a man may be a gentleman, although he foolishly calls himself a gymnasiarch but it does need
someone to tell the gymnasium shareholders that if they want the enterprise to succeed, they must
teach its honoured promoters to trust, and not to slight, the man upon whom it entirely depends, and in
whose absence the new Liverpool Gymnasium would pass entirely out of the public mind, and cease
to be a public institution.

1865 18 Nov - The Porcupine - Mr. Hulley’s Brain
The Gymnasiarch was complemented highly by Lord Stanley last Monday evening week, at the
opening of the emporium of muscularity in Myrtle-Street; but the Albion of the previous Monday, in
speaking of the building, awarded Mr Hulley an amount of invidious praise that must even have
staggered our local Hercules himself. After a gushing opening. It remarked --

The Liverpool Gymnasium had its birth in the enthusiastic brain of Mr Hulley, the gymnasiarch, who is
accumulating to his credit a heavy debt of obligation against the manhood of Liverpool.

The sentence reads to us marvellously strange. It makes us think that brick, water, and foundation-
stone have all issued from Mr Hulley's cranium, making it as it were, a mental building-yard, or a brain
which, like one of Pharaoh’s serpents, is a capable of producing immense tangible efforts effects from
infinitesimal beginnings. Perhaps Messrs. Holme and Nicol might be induced to enter into negotiat-
ions with Mr Hulley for this marvellous organ of his.

1865 25 Nov - Sporting Life - THE NEW GYMNASIUM AT LIVERPOOL
The sensible and judicious speech of Lord Stanley, at the opening of the new gymnasium in Myrtle-
street, Liverpool, on Monday week has been generally quoted, and may recommend the practice of
healthy and invigorating bodily exercises to the youth of other cities and towns. His lordship referred to
the fact that the institution which they were called upon to inaugurate owed its existence to the energy
of his friend Mr. Melly, who, aided by a few supporters, had raised the sum of £10,000, required for its
construction. The total cost had been £14,000, but of this £4,000 had been raised on mortgage; the
remainder had been raised by shares. The yearly expense would be £1,000, which there was no
doubt would be obtained, since the returns for the first six months were £700. The site, containing 1,450
yards, in Myrtle-street, one of the most central parts of the town, was purchased on lease. The design
of Mr. Walter Scott was selected, a contract was taken by Messrs. Nicholson and Ayre for £7,000, and
the foundation-stone of the building was laid on July 18, 1864, by Mr. Charles Mozley, then Mayor.
The building, as it now stands, is of most handsome construction externally, and of admirable
proportions. The area occupied is 1,450 square yards. On the ground floor is the central hall, 105ft.
long, 75ft wide, and 60ft. high . There is a wide gallery on the first floor, running round the side of the
hall, and also a fine room , to be used as a school of arms, in which M. Durbec, a skilled swordsman of
acknowledged reputation, will hold joint dominion with Jem Mace, whose ability with the gloves no
one will be inclined to dispute. In addition to these there are dressing rooms, lavatories and bath-
rooms for both sexes, and private apartments for the gymnasiarch and officials.
As to the apparatus, if we say that it has been supplied regardless of expense , though using a
hackneyed phrase, we speak only a simple fact. The large hall presents to the eye an array of ladders,
bars, ropes, and nets, which, to the uninitiated, is hopelessly bewildering. We have been through the
whole building (says the Liverpool Albion), and were unfeignedly pleased with everything we saw.
Mr. Hulley, the well-known master of athletic sports and exercises, under whose superintendence
these arrangements have been completed, has had a most extensive experience, both in England
and on the continent; and we may safely say that everything the most accomplished gymnast may
desire will here be found.
The institution has been virtually open for some weeks and we are pleased to observe that over 600
members are already enrolled. The ladies’ classes, and the youths’ classes, for the day, have been,
so far, very successful, and promise to be still more so. The same may be said of the evening
classes. In the centre of the hall is a large open space wherein a considerable number of pupils
may be exercising at one time.
The scene from the gallery at eight o’clock in the evening, when the classes commence, is a most
animated and pleasing one. From 100 to 150 or 200 finely built athletes, with iron muscle, and
unflinching nerve observable in every movement, are here, there, and everywhere and all perform-
-ing some feat of grace or strength. One, with a litle of the seaman in his blood, runs up the rigging
with an agility that many an old tar might envy. Here a brawny youth is wielding gracefully a pair of
heavy clubs; and there, again, a little knot of competitors are trying to out-do each other with seem-
-ingly impossible feats on the bar. In the centre, a class under the direction of Mr. Hulley, are vent -
-ilating their lungs a little by a series of graceful movements which, in unison, have a very pretty
effect.
Everywhere there is activity, and sooner or later, as the case may be, everyone engaged will feel the
benefit. By the courtesy of Mr. Hulley, ladies and gentlemen are now admitted nightly to the gallery;
and we are sure that all who pay the gymnasium a visit will agree with us that they have been grati-
-fied with, what they have seen, and that they will do all they can to make the institution a success.
Illustrated London News.

1865 16 Dec - The Porcupine - MUSCULAR MUSIC
By kind permission of the Courier, which permission, by the way, we omitted to ask for, we reprint the
following advertisement: -
Wanted, a pianist, and hour a day, for days a week. -- Apply at the
Liverpool Gymnasium, between the hours of 11 and 12 o'clock.
Being somewhat puzzled to understand the meaning of this appeal to a neglected genius, we dispatch-
-ed our smartest boy as ambassador to the Gymnasiarch, to make the necessary enquiries.
The object appears to be to provide the orchestral accompaniments, without which gymnastic
excellence cannot be achieved. Those who have witnessed at Hengler’s Circus, the graceful evolu-
-tions of the “Bounding Brothers of the Breathless Bungalows” will remember that many of the feats
performed are greatly aided by the efforts of the violins, and that Mad’lle Smitherini’s jump through
paper-covered hoops - the flight of the balloons, we believe it is called - would be nothing without a
sympathetic bang of the big drum. The Gymnasiarch, fully alive to the advantages of music, but
apprehensive that the shareholders of the gymnasium might not tolerate such a draw up on the
dividends as a full orchestra would cause, has decided to engage a pianist, and during one hour a day,
on four days in the week, the performances of the Gymnasium will be enlivened by popular piano-forte
selections from the best composers. The parallel bars exercises will go pleasantly to a few bars from
the “Barber of Seville,” while the high rope and flying ladder will be attempted to an spiriting chord or
two from the opera of “La Gazza Lantra.” The boxing, under Professor Mace, will become a lively set-
to the tune of the “Battle of Prague,” and at the close of the entertainment the various gymnasts will
pose in the arena, the Gymnasiarch, in an elegant and defined attitude, being the centre figure, the
pianist devoting the last few minutes of the hours engagement to a grand burst from “Robert
the Devil.” The idea is a good one; and, if a Mayor performs to Saturday Evening Concert music,
it appears to us to be natural that a Gymnasiarch should seek to enliven his programme with a little
music of an equally meritorious character. If this scheme is to found to answer, as we believe it will,
the Gymnasiarch will perhaps go so far as to add a little red and blue fire on special occasions.

1866 04 Jan - Royal Cornwall Gazette - GYMNASTICS IN LIVERPOOL -
The first distribution of prizes in connection with the Liverpool Gymnasium, now a very popular institution,
took place on Thursday afternoon, under the direction of the Gymnasiant, Mr. Hulley. The large hall was
crowded by the elite of Liverpool, and the proceedings excited great interest. The exercises consisted of
the ordinary class practice, including the French bar, bells, horizontal and parallel bars, storming and
escalating fort, dumb bell, and American ring exercises. The appearance of the young competitors,
dressed in a picturesque uniform consisting of scarlet knickerbockers, light singlet, and blue sash,
added greatly to the brilliance of the scene. In the course of the proceedings the Gymnasiant delivered
a brief address on the importance of systematic physical culture.
A still more interesting event came off on Saturday, namely, the distribution of prizes to those members
of the ladies’ class belonging to the institution who have excelled in the calisthenic and gymnastic
exercises. This mater is receiving special attention in Liverpool, the leading medical men in the town
cordially supporting it. The first prize was presented by the mayor, J. Farnworth, Esq., and another by
the representative of the borough, T. R. Graves, Esq., M. P.

1866 06 Jan - Wrexham Advertiser etc - LLANDUDNO - TESTIMONIAL TO MR JOHN HULLEY.
A beautifully illuminated address on vellum, signed by all classes of the inhabitants of Llandudno, has
been forwarded by Dr Roden. "to the celebrated Gymnasiarch of Liverpool, to whom Llandudno owes
so much." We understand that a service of plate was offered to Mr Hulley, which he declined, but he has
now been presented with this less expensive form of a public approval. The following is a copy of the
address: -
And we the undersigned residents of Llandudno, having witnessed with gratitude and your singular
energetic and successful efforts in inaugurating and carrying into execution the Olympic Games,
aquatic sports, land and water illuminations, torchlight fetes, and other amusements during the past
season, and fully appreciating your disinterested conduct in devoting your time and talents without
compensation or reward to these objects, and to the introduction of a better and more decent system of
sea-bathing at present is practised in English watering-places, beg to present you with this expression
of our sincere and heartfelt thanks feeling deeply that your indefatigable exertions have largely contrib-
-uted to the present and permanent welfare of Llandudno, as well as to the enjoyment of thousands of
visitors, both young and old, who will, we doubt not, in common with ourselves, they're a kindly and
lasting recollection of your valuable services.

1866 13 Jan - Liverpool Mercury - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM. TORCHLIGHT PROCESSION
Last evening Mr. Hulley, the gymnasiarch, organised a rather novel though singularly effective variation
from the usual routine of the gymnasium - to wit, a grand torchlight procession. It had been intended that
it should take place on Monday evening last, and an attempt was actually made, but the boisterous
weather rendered it anything but congenial to the members. Last night was selected for the second
attempt, and, though some were deterred through fears of a fall in their progress, it passed off with
complete success. At eight ‘clock about 150 members of the gymnasium, each supplied with a
petroleum torch confined in a tin case, and most of them attired in the neat costume of the institution,
sallied forth under the direction of Mr. Hulley and Mr. J. B. Lee, and took processional order in classes,
each under the direction of a class leader, along Bedford-street South and the Prince’s Park-road. On
their arrival at the Prince’s Park gates the torches were lighted. They burnt very steadily and cast a ruddy
glare far and wide. The novel sight attracted a large concourse of spectators, in addition to the friends of
the members who had followed them from the gymnasium. Many were the speculations of the uninitiat-
-ed as to what such a singular demonstration could mean. The procession then broke into a trot, and
the members sang short choruses, to the immense edification of the neighbourhoods through which they
passed. As a corner was turned, those in advance heard a nervous individual express a conviction, in
evident alarm, that the Fenians must have risen and were taking this peculiar method of proclaiming the
wrongs of Old Ireland. On entering Aigburth-road, open order was taken on each footpath. The road was
now lighted up for several hundred yards, and the effect was exceedingly pretty, the clear light bringing
into full relief the dresses of tbe gymnasts and the faces of wondering spectators peeping over gates
and from behind curtains. The dreadfully slippery state of the road rendered progress very uncertain and
more than one unfortunate torchbearer had a tale of woe to tell on his return. The journey back was per-
- formed at a rapid trot, and the gymnasium was again reached after about an hour’s absence.It is intend-
ed to repeat the exercise in a short time. It is certainly capital for the lungs, and is pleasing as a variation
from the nightly routine.

1866 10 Feb - The Porcupine -THE GYMNASTIC FESTIVAL
The Festival at the noble Gymnasium, in Myrtle-street, on Thursday evening, was in every respect spec-
-ial and unique. It noticed, design, and execution. It was entirely admirable, original, and attractive.
There are so many points of deep interest in the subject, some of which were ably and feelingly indicated
by the Rev. Nevison Loraine, in his address, that we are at a loss which to select as the text of a few
necessarily brief remarks. The presidency of the gallant "Hero of Delhi," Sir John Jones, K.C.B.; the
interest of the contrast between the dear feeble children sought to be benefitted, and the dear, healthy,
cheerful children, whose exercises formed so charming a feature in the programme; the glorious prom-
-ise for the future embodied in so many energetic specimens of young manhood and vigorous youth;
the lesson on the value of enthusiasm - fanaticism if you will - conveyed so strongly in the public career
of Mr Hulley; these points, and many more, press for notice, but must perforce be remitted to another
occasion.
As we surveyed the dense ranks of spectators on this occasion, the thought suggested itself forcibly, of
how short a time (since this athletic creed was popularised by Mr Hulley) had sufficed to make gymnas-
-tics a real interest of our social life. There was no dilettantism in the performance - no histrionic senti-
-ment - it was all earnest, helpful, enjoyable work sound to the core; no languor, reserve of energy, or
straining for effect, but such a vigorous effort as Englishmen could force when their hearts are in what
they do. And that this feeling of thoroughness was fully shared by the spectators was abundantly
proved, not only by the hearty and general applause, bursting forth frequently all through the evening,
but also by that suppressed excitement during the contests and exercises, so easily recognized a
crowded assembly, but so hard to describe in words.
It would be a pleasure, and one that we find it hard to deny ourselves, to notice in detail the items on the
programme. To dwell on the harmonious regularity of movement in the bar, club, and dumbbell drill, a
clever neatness of the fencing and boxing -especially the cunning activity of Mace and the lithe elegance
of Durbec, the muscular power and cleanness of the jumping, and the daring grace of the feats on the
ropes and rings. But we must, at present, confine ourselves to the pleasant duty of offering our heartiest
congratulations to our athletic friends on the brilliant success of the Festival. We doubt not their convict-
-ion that they never put forth a God-given strength in the holier cause than that of helpless infancy; and,
from what we have seen of the genial goodfellowship, it is unnecessary to express the hope that it may
never be put forth in a worse.
It is no ordinary pleasure that we had this record, a fact in the highest degree creditable to the Corporat-
-ion of Liverpool. On Wednesday without a division, the council voted £100 per annum for the further-
ance of the same good courts. In the children's names, we have, too, to acknowledge with thanks a
donation and a subscription received this week -
Mr Isaac Jackson £5 0 0
Mr Wm Knapman (annual subscription) 0 10 0

1866 15 Feb - Bradford Observer - GYMNASTIC ENTERTAINMENT
Yesterday evening the Bradford Athletic Club gave their first grand annual entertainment and assault-at-
arms in the Alexandra Theatre. There was a large audience. An address on “Physical Education” was
given by Mr. John Hulley, of Liverpool. The programme was exceedingly attractive, and the wonderful
gymnastic feats performed gave great satisfaction to the auditory. The members of the Bradford Athletic
Club were assisted by amateur gymnasts aand athletes from Manchester, Liverpool, Huddersfield and
Leeds. The gymnastic part of the entertainment included dumb-bellexercises, fencing, parallel bars,
cavalry sword exercise, Indian clubs, feast of swordsmanship, lance exercise, single-stick, flying rings,
and trapeze. Some of the members of the 3rd West York Rifle Volunteers performed bayonet exercises.
The band of the regiment performed a selection of dance and other music. The proceeds of the enter-
-tainment are to be applied to the establishment of a permanent Gymnastic Institution.

1866 17 Feb - The Sportsman - ASSAULT AT ARMS AT BRADFORD
Last Wednesday evening the members of the Bradford Athletic Club, assisted by gentlemen from
Manchester, Liverpool, Huddersfield, and Leeds, gave their first annual grand assault at arms, in the
Royal Alexandra Theatre, the proceeds of which were announced to be devoted to establishing a
permanent gymnastic institution in the town. The theatre was crowded from floor to dome with an
enthusiastic and appreciative audience. the programme include an address on the importance of
physical education by John Hulley, Esq., gymnasiarch of Liverpool; horizontal and parallel bar
exercises, Indian club and dumbbell exercises, fencing, broadsword, boxing, and the bayonet exercise,
by twenty members of the 3rd West York Rifle Volunteers. The whole of the members acquitted them-
-selves in the most creditable manner; several of the exercises were remarkably well done, especially
those on the parallel bars by Messrs Best, Lee, Holden, Haslem, Warden, Craigg, Dewhurst, Gledhill,
Thompson, and Lillywhite. The boxing was also very good, that of the middleweights, Messrs Thomp-
-son and Anderson, being loudly encored. The assault terminated about eleven o’clock, and the mem-
-bers and a number of the supporters of physical educaton adjourned to the Sun Hotel, where a most
sumptuous supper was provided by the committee. Mr. Hulley was voted to the chair. In the course of
the evening the chairman, in a brief speech, proposed “Success to the Bradford Athletic Club,” express-
-ing his fervent wish that all their future efforts might be as successful as that, their first. Mr. Johnson, the
hon. sec., thanked Mr Hulley for his good wishes, and for the assistance he had afforded them; stating
that the gentleman’s name appearing on the bills had given the public a confidence in the undertaking
they might not otherwise have had. The Saltaire band, one of the best volunteer bands in the kingdom,
enlivened the proceedings of the evening by playing a choice selection of music.

1866 17 Feb - The Porcupine - THE GYMNASIARCH AND THE CHILDREN’S INFIRMARY
The Assault at Arms, which so much delighted all who witnessed it, at which we briefly noticed last
week, has resulted in obtaining towards the new Building Fund for the Children's Infirmary the sum of 50
GUINEAS. Mr Hulley, in handing this substantial donation to the care of PORCUPINE, expresses the
great pleasure he has had working on behalf of the institution. It was a pleasure which he had for some
time contemplated, and he hopes to be able to renew it annually. Other kind friends have born in mind
suffering children of children of the poor during the past week, and we have a special pleasure in
acknowledging the following: -- Ash Wednesday Offertory at St Bartholomew's Church, Roby, per Rev.
G. J. Banner, Feb. 14 1866, £2 16s 7d. This weeks contributions therefore stand thus: --
Mr John Hulley £52 10 0
Offertory from St Bartholomew's £2 16 7
Brother U. 0 10 0

1866 24 Mar - The Porcupine - Hulley v. Arnold. We hear that Mr. Hulley has commenced an action for damages
against Matthew Arnold for publishing in the "Cornhill Magazine" an article on Llandudon in which
reference is made to his well-known supremacy over that watering-place.

1866 24 Mar - The Porcupine - A REAL MOVE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Rarely, indeed, do we comment by anticipation on public entertainments, but an announcement has
been made by Mr Hulley, which deserves to be taken out of the ordinary category. An Assault-at-arms is
to take place at the Gymnasium on Wednesday night, which is no mere exhibition of prowess, but the
inauguration of a system by which we may well hope that physical education will be permanently and
considerably advanced. To Mr Hulley belongs the honour of establishing the physical culture as a
pursuit in the north of England, if not throughout the country, and the success he has achieved has ex-
ceeded the utmost anticipations of the few who believed in him, and placed in the most ridiculous light
those who ridiculed his endeavours. All that can be done by unfaltering example and by contagious
enthusiasm has been done by Mr Hulley, and, beyond this, his direction of the movement has been as
wise as it was energetic. He has made himself an authority on his favourite topic; his gymnasium is a
model with which athletic students all over the country are eager to compare their institutions; and it only
remained for him to develop a system by which it would be possible to constitute the judgements of the
gymnasium, as recognized acknowledgements of physical prowess and skill.
This system has now been arrived at. The practice of prize and medal giving - open to great abuses --
has been displaced by a scheme of diplomas, which will be assigned to competitors according to their
achievements. There will be diplomas of the first, second, and third class, and thus each competitor will
have in this possession an official and indubitable recognition of his powers and an incentive to further
exertions, either to excel or to maintain the position previously obtaining. We doubt not that in a very
short time the diplomas of the Liverpool Gymnasium will be sought far and near; for the distinction will
be a truly valuable one, and inflexible impartiality and exactness of Mr Hulley's management will always
maintain its value.
One example of Mr Hulley's wise and steady policy is to be found in his resolute adherence to the policy
which he has advocated since the beginning of his public life, that of requiring from every competitor, a
general proficiency. No diploma, whatever will be granted to anyone who does not obtain marks in, 1st,
a foot race; 2nd, high running leap; 3rd. long leap; 4th, climbing a rope with hands and feet; 5th. rising
and sinking in parallel bars; 6th, swimming; 7th, putting 36lb. shot. It must be evident to every one that
when not even the lowest diploma can be gained without the possession of the amount of proficiency
thus indicated, this certificate will be far more valuable than if it were given, as prizes too often are, for
abnormal proficiency in one particular exercise. The latter principle develops high and showy achieve -
-ments, but it is at a cost of general unhealthiness. The former requires from every competitor, a per-
-fection of condition and powers which, though ideal in completeness is practically very easy to gain
under a proper system of training. The advantage of a high standard of perfection is indisputable, and
we feel convinced that the establishment of these diplomas, which can only be won by real work, will
produce a general quickening throughout the country of physical culture.
When we look abroad, or even around our own homes, and see the signs of physical degeneracy which
abound, and which are it to a certain extent, the natural results of sedentary lives, we cannot but feel
alarmed at the future of our race, which cannot but be destined to still greater deterioration, unless the
course of things is changed by some strenuous effort. That effort will be best made under Mr Hulley's
generalship, and it is very gratifying to find that he has laid his plans so wisely that, while ensuring the
utmost popularity for his institution, he as surely lays the foundations of its real and vital supremacy as a
University of Physical Education.

1866 06 Apr - Nottinghamshire Guardian - WILD WALES AND HER WATERING PLACES -
Account of forthcoming events at Llandudno. (Incl. Mr J. Hully, the great gymnasiarch)

1866 10 May - Birmingham Daily Gazette - LLANDUDNO SEASON.
L A N D A N D W A T E R F E T E S
TO COMMENCE WITH
T H E F I F T H O L Y M P I C F E S T I V A L
OF THE
A T H L E T I C S O C I E T Y O F G R E A T B R I T A I N
WHICH WILL BE HELD
On MONDAY and TUESDAY, JUNE 25 and 26, 1866,
On a scale hitherto unprecedented.
PRESIDENT - COLONEL WALMSLEY
For Programmes, Rules, &c., apply to John Hulley, Gymnasiarch,
of Liverpool, Vice-President of the Athletic Society.
Liverpool Gymnasium.
(also published on the 17 May 1866)

1866 12 May - The Porcupine -THE ATHLETIC FESTIVAL AT LLANDUDNO
The forthcoming festival of the Athletic Society, at Llandudno, will be one of the greatest and most im-
-portant events of the century. It will, in fact, form a red-letter day from which future historians will date of
the commencement of civilisation, and the first step in the march of intellect. Several of the crowned
heads of Europe have promised to attend and bring their wives and families with them. Mr Hulley, who
has lately styled himself the Gymnasiarch of the World, has made every arrangement for the reception
of visitors, so that the crowned heads need be under no apprehension of not being able to secure
lodgings. As the houses at Llandudno are limited in number, Mr Hulley has ordered several thousand
tents to be pitched on the shore during the festival. He himself will sleep in the sea, clothed in his
bathing-dress, and chanting himself to sleep by singing, in his rich tenor voice, "A life on the ocean
waves." The Emperor of China contributes twenty-million coloured lamps and a pound of green tea to the fund which has been formed by the inhabitants of Llandudno for the purpose of inducing visitors
to visit their bay during the forthcoming season. We understand that a Mr Shem, Ham, or Japheth, has
been over to Paris, and secured all the bathing-dresses made on the continental principle. Any lady or
gentleman visiting theresidence of this Levite, in Hardman-street, will have one of these dresses pre-
-sented to them, together with the half of a five-pound note for them to forward to the Chancellor of the
Exchequer for unpaid income tax. In case they do not wish to negotiate a bathing-dress on these cond-
-itions, we have no doubt that the owner of the articles in question will supply a complete suit at a very
moderate price.
To-day there will be launched a six-oared gig, which has been built for the members of the Athletic
Society. It has been constructed, we believe, for the purpose of taking the members of the society -
ninety in number - from the Prince’s Landing-stage to Llandudno Bay. We are not yet aware how the
Gymnasiarch of the World purposes to take all his athletes over in this marine conveyance; but we
understand that he is at present studying the problem that so puzzled Archimedes, respecting the man
who had to take a fox, a goose, and a bag of corn over a stream. He has already solved the calculation,
"If Tom's father was John's son, what relation is John to Thomas?" and no doubt will eventually at a
correct solution to the problem at which he is now so assiduously working. We cannot conclude this
preliminary notice of the forthcoming festival better than quoting the peroration of Mr Hulley's great
speech at St Georges Hall Llandudno, on the occasion of his being presented with the thanks of the
town: - "What," said the Gymnasiarch, "is the result of a pure mind? - a pure body. How is a pure body
to be obtained? - why, by abluting in the bay. What says the poet - ‘Thy towers, Bombay, gleam white,
they say.’ Need I say more.

Tempora mutantur, mens sana in corpore sano, palmam qui Meruit ferat.
(The times change, a healthy mind in a sound body, who has earned it bear the reward)

We understand that Mr Hulley has consented to forego his title of Gymnasiarch of the World for that of
Llandudno Bay, or Bey of Llandudno. In addition to the calculations we have already spoken of his
being engaged in, rumour states that he is also hard at work designing a figure of himself, which is to be
cast in pure gold, and placed at the bottom of Bold-street. It may also interest some of our readers to
inform them that Mr Hulley has just had completed a costume of infinite finish. The jacket and inexpress-
-ibles are composed of the finest flannel; and on the collar of the first-named is, embroidered in gold, the
arms of the Athletic Society, encircled by a wreath of oak leaves and acorns. The boots come half-way
up the calf of the leg, and are made of untanned leather; the tops are bound with scarlet morocco, while
a bullion tassel dangles from the front. To complete the costume, he wears, for what earthly reason we
are at a loss to imagine, a field-Marshal’s sash, which is composed, as our readers are aware, of alter-
-nate half-inch stripes of crimson and gold. He has not yet decided upon a head-dress. How about a
cocked hat?

1866 15 May - Liverpool Daily Post - THE LLANDUDNO FETES AND THE AMUSEMENT COMMITTEE -
The best of Distin’s famous military bands is now the band of Llandudno! They are to arrive here on the
28th of May, and to stay here, if necessary, till the 29th of October, to play every day (Sundays excepted)
from ten o’clock to twelve in the forenoon, a d from seven till half-past nine o’clock in the evening, with-
-out asking for pay or receiving it from any other parties than the committee. Colonel Walmsley read a
letter from Mr. Hulley, wherein he stated that each person who entered the athletic sports ground should
be required to wear his ticket in his hat, and ladies in their bonnets. The grand stand should be built to
accommodate at least 1,500 people, being eight stories in height, the seats being deep and comfort -
-able, so that all could sit with ease and have plenty of room. He stated that a great number of gentle-
-men in various parts of the country were now in training for the coming sports at Llandudno; and the
applications he was receiving were so numerous that he could not get through the answers by himself.
“they were sure of an immense field of competitors,” he said. The card committee reported that they
would complete their work as soon as the houses were ready for them.

1866 02 Jun - The Porcupine - Mr Hulley Will Explain
We have received several letters expect in the admission of the public to the Gymnasium. From the
statements made. It would appear that there is no rule laid down by the committee, or rather Mr Hulley,
(for the latter seems to include the former,) upon the matter, the consequence is, that Jacks in office take
upon themselves to select who shall or who shall not visit the strangers Gallery. "A Working Man” says: --
"Having a desire to see the performances of Mr Hulley's pupils, and learning from a friend that the public
were admitted to what he called the strangers’ gallery, after having divested myself of my working
clothes, and made myself presentable, I took a stroll down as far as the Gymnasium this (Monday) even-
-ing, and, stepping inside the building, looked round me for the way leading to this gallery. I had, per-
haps, been in the building a minute, when I was somewhat sharply accosted by a military official,
(commissioner I think it's the name,) and told that I could not stand there. I asked to be directed to the
strangers’ gallery, when he told me that he could not admit me. I expressed my surprise, saying that I
had been told by a friend, who had been a few evenings previously, that the public were admissible. He
replied that they were sometimes. I said, then I presumed that this is a special occasion, to which he
replied that it was, but in so hesitating a manner as to lead me to doubt whether the man was speaking
the plain truth or not. I thanked him, and walked out. May I say that I felt hurt at my reception, as even the
working man is not devoid of feeling and self-respect; and I must say I find it difficult to rid myself of the
idea that there is snobbery somewhere. If you could furnish me with the key to the above I should feel
obliged."

1866 09 Jun - The Porcupine - Mr Hulley Explains
Mr Hulley, in reply to the complaint of a working man, which we inserted last week, states that the
following paragraphs, has appeared in the Mercury for the last five months: -
Liverpool Gymnasium, Myrtle-street - By permission of the Gymnasiarch, ladies and gentlemen are
admitted to the galleries to witness the class exercises, every evening, between the hours of seven and
nine o'clock. (Children not admitted.)

We presume, from this curt reply, that Mr Hulley did not consider our correspondent "a gentleman," or
must have thought him a baby. He further states that "the Gymnasium was never intended for the artisan
class." Fine feathers make fine birds, and since Mr Hulley -- we beg his pardon -- the Gymnasiarch of
Liverpool, has thought it becoming to imitate the Town-hall flunkeys by covering himself with gold and
lace, his notions of gentility and respectability are considerably altered. We would respectfully suggest
that after this he should alter his motto. Instead of “a sound mind in a sound body," it would be more
consistent were he to say, a weak mind and fancy clothing.

1866 16 Jun - The Porcupine - Mr HULLEY AT LLANDUDNO From our Special Special
You will no doubt have heard that Mr John Hulley, the working man's friend, otherwise known to himself
as the Gymnasiarch of Liverpool, has purchased Llandudno as a summer residence. He has taken
possession of his new purchase, and can be seen parading himself on the shore in the costume of a
Field Marshal. He allows that the present occupiers of the place to remain in the vicinity during the
summer months, but will turn them all out of house and home as soon as the weather becomes
implement, so as to allow the poet, who wrote Nathan and Co.’s circular to compose a second "Deserted
Village." This party has already commenced his poem, and succeeded in producing the following:

Llandudno, loveliest village of the plane,
The pride of nations and the azure main;
I think I'll be wherever I may go -

Here, he has stopped, having come to a standstill for a rhyme to go. he has written to his late employers,
and they have suggested -

For Hulley-sea-garments to Nathan and Co.

Colonel Walmsley, objects to this, and wishes the following to be inserted: -
‘Twill never do to give thee up so, oh!

This has reference to Mr Hulley's purchase of the place, the gallant Colonel feeling himself aggrieved at
having to give up his rights to the Gymnasiarch. How the affair will end, we are at a loss to imagine: all
we know at present is, that the despoiler walks about the shore, gnashing his teeth and glaring at the
little boys building sand castles. Previous to the destruction of the place, certain sports, as our readers
are aware, are to take place, and already five millions of visitors have arrived to witness the proceed-
-ings. Indeed, so great is the immigration that Mr Hulley has ordered the great Ormeshead to be
excavated, and a cave for the accommodation of the people.
The Isle of Man expanding steamer, however, has been put on the station, so as to meet the exigencies
of the occasion, and everyone is wondering where passengers will be put on their arrival. "Such is life,"
said the brave Gymnasiarch, when he heard the intelligence: “What is life? ‘tis a beautiful flower, even
as one of those I can purchase at St John’s Market for twopence. I saw men - bronzed, bearded men -
moved to tears when they heard these simple but impressive words. The exertions of this great man -
meaning the Gymnasiarch - are truly astounding. The feats he intends in accomplishing at the Festival
are truly surprising. He purposes swimming a mile with his hands and feet tied, propelling himself with
his upper jaw; he will run a hundred miles in a similar number of minutes; and will crack a boulder with
his front teeth, and tie himself into a "Tom fool’s knot. These are only a few of the feats he promises:
what he will do on the day in question, time only will show.
There is one great feature about the Gymnasiarch all would do well to imitate, and that is his modesty.
All the time he's toiling and moiling for the benefit of the human race, he never for one moment seems
to give a single thought to himself. He sees around him men pushing and striving to gain a bubble
reputation; but he follows not in their track, being satisfied with the thought that he is doing good to his
fellow-beings, and trying to get the working man into the Gymnasium, while the gentlemen are working.
I must not forget to mention, before I close this communication, a very pretty and novel idea Mr Hulley
purposes carrying out. He intends to carve the lesser Ormeshead into a likeness of himself, with mov-
-able eyes, composed of crimson lights. He very naturally says it will be useful to the "travellers by the
sea" in that neighbourhood. The fishermen object, and say that such an object will frighten the fish; but
who ever heard of fishermen being satisfied?

1866 23 Jun - The Porcupine - Mr Hulley "in the Middle of a German Band"
We read in the Llandudno Herald that a party of Germans chartered a steamer from Liverpool, and
proceeded to Llandudno a few Sundays ago. Mr Hulley, although he is not a German, was one of the
party, and no sooner did he land on the coast, and he raised a banner, and joined in the popular ditty "A
Life on the Ocean Wave," which the young German gentleman indulged in. In addition to this the party,
we hear, dined at the Adelphi Hotel, and waked the town from its propriety by shouting and singing. We
see no reason why Mr Hulley should plant a standard on the shores of any watering-place he may visit
because he wears a field-marshal’s sash; or join in Sabbath-breaking with young gentlemen, who are
celebrated for exuberance of spirits, because he is a Gymnasiarch. The editor of the Herald condemn-
-ed this Germanic invasion, and Mr Hulley resented the reproof in language more remarkable for musc-
-ularity thandelicacy. And further to show how much Mr Hulley respects liberty of the press, the Herald is
not permitted to have a reporter at the meetings connected with the Festival.

1866 27 Jun - The Manchester Guardian: OLYMPIC FESTIVAL AT LLANDUDNO.
Full account of the two-day event with John Hulley as director of the games.

1866 27 Jun - The Manchester Guardian: Advertisement for the Second Annual Juvenile Athletes Olympic Festival at
Llandudno to be held on 24 and 25 July – John Hulley Joint Honorary secretary.

1866 30 Jun - Chester Chronicle - OLYMPIC FESTIVAL AT LLANDUDNO
The delightful and picturesque sea-bathing town of Llandudno was on the three first days of the present
week the scene of considerable bustle and gaiety, consequent on the fifth annual Olympic festival of the
Athletic Society of Great Britain (which has for its president Colonel H. M. Walmsley, and the vice-presid-
-ent Mr. John Hulley, gymnasiarch of Liverpool) being held there. There was a very good attendance of
both ladies and gentlemen. Mr. Hulley acted as director of the festival.
(including a full report of each event)

1866 30 Jun - The Porcupine - THE FESTIVAL AT LLANDUDNO
From our Special Special
"Hulley is the man that we do admire,” worth of chant the dwellers at Llandudno, in their native guttral, as
night after night, they serenade him, led by the Welsh editor (Tydian,) who is known to be so partial
German music; but the great man heeds them not, although he always treats them with the greatest
respect. I saw him the other night, after the fatigues of the day and indulging in German sacred music
after dinner, step into the balcony of his hotel, and bow to the multitude who had assembled below
to do homage to him. He simply bowed. It was a fine sight to see the great man standing humbly in the
pale moonlight, bowing his mute acknowledgement of the enthusiasm he had created. They call him
here Ap Gal Llan Rilbaldi, or of the Garibaldi of the North.
I must confess that I, like the natives here, am so lost in admiration of the Gymnasiarch's greatness and
simplicity that I neglected my legitimate business to gaze upon him. I am forgetting to speak of the band
of gallant youths who had gathered round his banner to struggle for their leader. It is a charming sight to
see the hero, surrounded by his followers, walking up and down the Ormes: His dress is gorgeous,
being one mass of gold and crimson. But I have already described it, and have only to add that, in add-
-ition to the articles of clothing already enumerated, he wears an antique Roman sword. The sports, from
first to last, have truly rivalled anything that ever took place in the ages when men thought wild beasts no
unworthy adversaries, and objected to dance around a prize-ring. The youths have struggled with a will
that would have excited enthusiasm in the breasts of the poorest. Dozens have succumbed to the
exertions, and have had to be carried off the field in a fainting condition or had to stay in the final heat,
and sit in the brook to cool themselves. The noble Gymnasiarch says nothing as he sees his champions
carried away before him. "’Twas so at Rome," I heard him mutter, as he calmly sheathed his sword, -
"when we are there, we must do as they do. Palmam qui Meruit ferat.” The great-hearted creature forgot
for the moment that he was not at Rome.
The sports are now over and the prizes have been given, and I shall return from the Gymnasiarch's
head-quarters today, a wiser and a better man. Wiser, for I have seen exercises that I never dreamt of,
and better, for I have listened to the Rev. Nevison Loraine's sermon on the mount. I have seen dumb-
-bells of gigantic size raised above the heads of the operators, - I have seen Indian clubs whirled around
with the rapidity of lightning, - I have seen the champion of England put on the gloves with an amateur,
- the expert diver, sink himself below the azure main and remain below till the grapnells of the Humane
Society had to be sent for, - I have seen the friend of Havelock surrounded by the fairest of the fair, adjud-
-icating on the heights of Llandudno, - and last, but not least, I have seen the Gymnasiarch flashing his
antique Roman sword in the sunshine.
All these things have I seen and more, for I have seen the distribution of prizes, and the gallant Drink-
-water receiving a prize he hadn't won and offering to return it. I saw him take the chalice from the friend
of Havelock, and also saw the thousands of anxious eyes that were cast upon it, looking as if they could
drink water or any other beverage out of it, the sun had parched them so. It was a gratifying sight to see
the commodore raise the cup to his lips and exclaim, "Here's your good health and your family's good
health, may they live long and prosper -- this don't count."
All these things and more have I seen faithfully chronicle for your pages, in the hope that your readers
may thoroughly appreciate the festival, which is now numbered amongst the things that have been.

1866 30 Jun - Wrexham Advertiser etc - LLANDUDNO - Full account of the Olympic Festival
Held over three days. Incl. The contests took place in a large field near Llandudno, which was enclosed,
a grandstand being erected at one side, which commanded a good view of the sports. There was a very
good attendance, both of ladies and gentlemen. Mr Hulley acted as director of the festival, which lasted
three days. The following officiated as judges: -- Professor Andre Birbeck, Professor Henry Neville,
Mr James Mace, a teacher of boxing; Mr W. Becton, teacher of wrestling; and Mr Ralph Mitchell, teacher
of swimming, of the Liverpool Gymnasium.

1866 07 Jul - The Illustrated London News report on the Olympic Festival at Llandudno.
Incl." This festival was got up mainly by the efforts of Colonel Hugh Walmsley, a gentleman now residing
in the neighbourhood, with the aid of Mr. Hulley, the able and popular conductor of the Liverpool Gymnas
-ium. The proceedings ..... took place on Monday, Tuesday and Wenesday last week."

1866 11 Aug - The Penny Illustrated Paper - Our Gossiper - AT The NATIONAL OLYMPIC FESTIVAL
(Including) A turbaned gentleman, attired in the garb of Turk was supposed to represent the East at the
Olympian Festival, but the fancifully-dressed one turned out to be the Gym - wait a minute, I'll spell it
directly -- the Gymnasiarch of Liverpool, John Hulley, and whom (as our friend " Old Nicholas.” would
remark in Fun), no more gorgeously apparelled.

1866 13 Sep - Liverpool Daily Post - BRITISH BATHING IN 1866 -
One of the most ludicrous anomalies connected with the British sense of decorum, on many points
exorbitant and prudish, is its capricious liberality on the subject of sea bathing “ in the nude.” In fresh
water we resent that indecent practice with extreme rigour, but seem to discern no harm in it if only the
water in which we bathe be salt. To the credit of Llandudno - a pretty little village on the Welsh coast,
much frequented by the wealthy inhabitants of Liverpool - it is the first British watering place which has
set itself to work in earnest to bring about a more convenient and decent system of bathing than that
which up to the present moment obtains everywhere in England; and with this view the services of Mr.
John Hulley, a well-known Liverpool swimming master* and gymnast, have been engaged. At the
request of the Llandudno town commissioners, this gentleman delivered last week a public lecture on
the subject of bathing as it is and bathing as it ought to be.
Mr. Hulley has visited Biarritz and has studied the system of bathing enforced at that queen of French
watering places, and gave his audience a graphic account not only of the superior decency, but also of
the superior luxury of the French system. At Biarritz the abominable damp, confined bathing machine is
unknown; in lieu of it, a long moresque building, containing ranges of comfortably fitted dressing-rooms
has been erected on the beach, with two general entrances, one for ladies, the other for gentlemen.
From this building, in front of which runs an ornamental corridor, the bathers descend to the sands by a
flight of steps, and, when once on the sands, all separation of the sexes ceases; both gentlemen and
ladies being as decorously and becomingly attiredin their bathing dresses as they were in the clothes
which they wore when walking from their lodgings to the Establisshment des Bains.
The following regulations which Mr. Hulley has suggested for the bathers at Llandudno are few, simple
and obvious.
1st, That no bathing in the nude by either sex be tolerated anywhere within view of the public;
2nd. That there shall be, as now, portions of the public beach set apart on which either sex may bathe
separately;
3rd, That there shall be a sort of sea parade, on which both sexes may meet and practice the art of
swimming under suitable regulations and proper instruction;
4th. That complete and decent clothing shall invariably be worn by every person who bathes in public.
These regulations appear to be so much to the taste of the visitors at Llandudno that they have been
adopted nem. con., and Mr. Hulley has already disposed of several hundred dresses brought over from
Biarritz, which n t only satisfy all the requirements of the most rigid decorum, but are also becoming
enough to the wearers.
{ * Mr. Hulley is not a swimming master. - ED.}.


1866 15 Sep - Berrow’s Worcester Journal - NEW BATHING REGULATIONS. -
a considerable discussion has been indulged in lately, with regard to a reform in the British practice of
bathing, and Llandudno has led the way. Under its "master of the beach," Mr Hulley, in beginning a new
system. The rules are: --
"That no bathing in the nude by either sex to be tolerated anywhere within view of the public. They shall
be, as now, portions of the public beach, set apart on which either sex may bathe separately. That there
shall be a sort of sea parade, on which both sexes may meet and practise the art of swimming under
suitable regulations and proper instruction. That complete and decent clothing shall invariably been
worn by every person who bathes in public."
Dresses from Biarritz have been imported , and are let out on hire.

1866 17 Sep - Liverpool Daily Post - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM
TO THE EDITOR OF THE DAILY POST - SIR, Being disappointed on Wednesday evening through not
being able to obtain admission to the Liverpool Gymnasium, I went again last evening, and through a
friend, did get in after some difficulty; but could I blame the attendants refusing me admittance on the
night before, as the galleries were very much crowded, and I was told are the same every evening. I
presumed through the very tasty ornaments lately made in this popular institution, and the addition of
the music made by Mr. Hulley. My reason for now writing is to suggest that Mr. Hulley should make a
nominal charge for admission (which might go towards the musical fund) so that anyone coming from a
distance may secure admission by purchasing a ticket, and so not have the annoyance of having to
return home without getting in. Yours respectfully, A VISITOR Liverpool, 14th Sept., 1866.

1866 08 Nov - Morning Post - THE EARL OF HARROWBY ON PHYSICAL EDUCATION -
On Tuesday evening. There was a grand assault-at-arms at the Liverpool Gymnasium, in celebration of
the opening of the building. In the absence of Mr S. R. Graves, M. P, Mr Charles P. Melly presided. The
Earl of Harrowby was present, and the magnificent room was crowded. The programme was gone
through, under the direction of the indefatigable J. Hulley, and the entertainment was, to the lovers of
physical exercise, in every respect, one of the most gratifying character. After a very spirited address
from Mr Melly, who warmly advocated the pursuit of gymnastic exercises, and stated that Liverpool owed
a debt of gratitude to Mr Hulley for what he had accomplished, the Earl of Harrowby then addressed the
assemblage.

1866 10 Nov - Porcupine report p375 Commemoration Day at the Gymnasium.
Incl. " Mr. Hulley has often been the subject of PORCUPINE'S light jests - called by the vulgar "cheap" but
perhaps he may again adorn a sportive paragraph in these columns. Let that be as it may. On the pres-
-ent occasion, however, our object is to do justice to the great public services of Mr. Hulley - we wish he
would not call himself the "Gymnasiarch."
At a time when all the friends of athletic development were in doleful dumps as to their prospects in this
town Mr. Hulley alone was hopeful - even cheerful. He saw that there was a great public work to be done,
and he put his shoulder to the wheel and did it. Not, however, with discouragements, without disappoint-
-ments, nor, sooth to say, without some degree of snubbing. But he has pulled through at last, and, as the
fruits of his labours, presents us with the establishment in Myrtle -street, its perfect organization, and com-
-plete adaptation to the purposes of the physical education of the young men of this town. We have
never been slow in remarking that the intellectual education of the Liverpool hopefuls had been fearfully
neglected. However we are in expectation that when Mr. Hulley, with his physical education, has provid-
-ed them with the corpus sanum, they will be more open to culture and the development of the mens
sana."
"A year ago, as Mr. Melly said, the Gymnasium was looked upon simply in the light of an xperiment. Few
people, with the exception of Mr. Hulley himself, regarded the project as likely to be successful. It has,
however, realized the hopes of its parent - if we may use such a term - in an abundant degree. It has
paid a good dividend. It had nearly two thousand active members, and fine members they are, if we may
judge from what we saw on Tuesday."
"In the speeches that were made after the so-called "assault-at-arms" we were heartily glad to hear the
complete justice that was done to Mr. Hulley's efforts and abilities. Everyone candidly acknowledged that
the undoubted and eminent success of the institution was solely due to the untiring exertions of Mr.
Hulley. We see that the gentleman is now agitating the public mind on the question of swimming. The
importance of the subject must at once be acknowledged in such a place as Liverpool, and we hope to
hear that some measures have been devised for making a knowledge of swimming more extensive
than it is. PORCUPINE, in taking leave of Mr. Hulley for the present, presents him with the thanks of the
whole community - at least the sensible portion - for his great services to the town."

1866 24 Nov - Liverpool Daily Post - LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM -
The public of Liverpool are again indebted to Mr. Hulley, who has kindly thrown the galleries of the
gymnasium open to visitors on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons, between the hours of 3.30 and 5
o’clock, during the class practice of the juvenile members of the institution. Apart from the pleasure to
be derived from witnessing the little athletes go through their graceful manoeuvres, the best of music is
discoursed under the direction of Mr. Eyton ,the able leader of the gymnasium band.

1867 - The Times - advert for book - A HANDBOOK of GYMNASTICS and ATHLETICS. By E.G. RAVENSTEIN
F.R.G.S., &c., President of the G.G.S. London, and JOHN HLLEY.Gymnasiarch of Liverpool. Price 8s.6d.

1867 - LIVERPOOL TRADES DIRECTORY
Hulley John Gymnasiarch, Liverpool Gymnasium Myrtle St

1867 02 Jan - Liverpool Mercury -THE GYMNASIUM
TO THE EDITORS OF THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY
Gentleman, - On Saturday I was present during the distribution of prizes amongst the ladies classes of
the Gymnasium. As an encouragement to the junior members, I would suggest that a special prize
should be given for which only those under 14 years of age could compete. I would further suggest that
"honourable mention" might also be made of those who merit it. Mr Hulley's arrangements are all so
admirable that perhaps it may seem presumptuous for me to propose that after the giving away of the
prizes, if it is not considered feminine for the ladies themselves to audibly applause either by clapping or
by the parliamentary. "Hear, hear," the band should have orders to strike up to relieve a somewhat
damping quietness, which at that moment prevails. I understand Mr Hulley has some idea of building an
additional dressing-room for the ladies, and I have heard many of the matrons remark that it would in-
-crease the numbers considerably if this room were fitted up with wooden cells, capable of holding
parties of three or four, being either friends or of one family, for which an additional charge might be
made - those who do not wish to pay this extra charge to resort to the old dressing rooms. -- Yours, &c.,
AN OBSERVER December 29, 1866.

1867 26 Jan - The Porcupine - Advert for A GRAND ASSAULT - AT - ARMS will be held in THE
LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM on the EVENING OF MONDAY, FEBRAURY 4 1867. UNDER
THE DIRECTION OF JOHN HULLEY GYMNASIARCH OF LIVERPOOL

1867 05 Feb - Liverpool Mercury - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM
Last evening, one of those displays which have greatly contributed to the popularity of gymnastics, took
place at the institution in Myrtle-street, which has Mr Hulley for its chief. These exhibitions of what
athletic training can achieve do not seem to wane in attractiveness by repetition. Last night, all those
parts of the splendid hall available for visitors were crowded, and even standing room was scarcely to
be obtained. A few trophies of flags gave a festive appearance to the interior, but the hall owed its
exceptional grace to the large number of ladies who were present to countenance and applaud the
efforts of the athletes The chair was occupied by Col Sir John Jones, K.C.B., and amongst those
present were noticed Mr Alderman Hubback, Mr Councillor C. P. Melly, Mr Councillor Holt, Mr George
Melly, Mr P. H. Rathbone, Mr T. S. Raffles, the Rev. Nevison Loraine, H. Campbell, &c.
At eight o'clock precisely, about a hundred of the senior members of the gymnasium, dressed in their
picturesque uniform, marched into the hall, and took up their positions upon the open space reserved for
the exercises. Sir John Jones, who entered immediately afterwards, was greeted with loud cheers. On
taking the chair, he said that it is afforded him great pleasure to preside on that occasion. He had been
present at every gathering of that character ever since the institution had been established, and has
always experienced the greatest gratification. Although they had not assembled for the purpose of
listening to speeches, he must say, and he was sure we would all agree with him, that Mr Hulley, by
whom the institution was founded, had carried it on most successfully. ("Hear," and applause.)
The large audience, whom he saw around, and the number of members present to take part in the
exercise is, are quite sufficient to prove us that Mr Hulley's efforts have been rewarded with success,
and that they were widely and highly appreciated. (Applause.) He would not detain them longer, except
to say that he was satisfied the performance, which is they were about to witness would be a source of
pleasure to all. (Applause.)

1867 23 Mar - Liverpool Daily Post - MR HULLEY AND “ACROBATICS.” - TO THE EDITOR OF THE DAILY POST -
SIR, In the columns of your paper of the 20th instant I read a paragraph relative to the tendency towards
(what Mr. Hulley is pleased to call) “acrobatics” exhibited by some members of the Gymnasium, which
has caused great dissatisfaction amongst the members generally, so far as to cause many who had
entered as competitors in the forthcoming “assault at arms” to withdraw their names from the list .
To stop the so-termed acrobatics I consider a great mistake on the part of the Gymnasiarch. There is no
denying that Mr. Hulley has been a greater acrobat than any of the present members, and that he is now
discountenancing it to obtain the patronage of the fastidious, and gain the confidence of timid parents.
But what in all ages, even the present, has been the guiding star of physical ,education? Ambition! Do
away with that and physical education will be overworked and fall to the ground, as it has done many
times before, though perhaps not from the same cause.
It is all very well to tell a man it is necessary for him to work clubs and dumb-bells before his breakfast in
the morning, but how many do so? Certainly none of those who attend the Gymnasium, as they prefer
displaying their exercises before an audience; consequently it must be those, and those only, who are
desirous of strengthening their muscles so as to excel in gymnastics or (á la Hulley) acrobatics. If Mr.
Hulley thoroughly studies physical education he will find that the nervous system requires as much
cultivation and exercise as the muscular system, for in many instances of muscular strength you will find
a great lack of spirit , confidence, energy, and what is commonly called pluck, or in other words a want of
nervous development. This is not to be acquired by the use of clubs, dumb-bells, or other spiritless
exercises, but by something more energetic and truly gymnastic.
Physical education has also to do with the development of the mind. But how? If you cultivate the musc-
-ular system only you can only reach it by means of the circulation of the blood, but when you take into
consideration that every nerve in the body is in direct communication with the brain by means of the
spinal cord, you will see the nervous system is more immediately connected with the mind than the
muscular; or how is it that navvies and such like are not more intelligent? If any person will take time to
consider they will find that a well-developed nervous system is far more useful in their journey through
life than any amount of muscular strength, and more especially amongst the class of society constitut-
-ing the members of the Liverpool Gymnasium, but it is impossible to acquire the former without the
latter, and I, in conjunction with many others, sincerely hope Mr. Hulley will see the error of stopping his
so-called acrobatics when the members who practise them have sufficient strength for their execution
with safety, before it is too late for th cause of physical education, I am, sir, yours truly,
A MEMBER OF THE LIVERPOOL ATHLETIC SOCIETY

1867 30 Mar - Liverpool Mercury - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM
Last evening another of those most popular entertainments, known as "assaults at arms" took place at
the Gymnasium, in Myrtle-street. The attractiveness of these displays was again proved by the large
assemblage, which occupied the floor and filled the galleries of the fine hall, which, decorated with
trophies of flags and brilliantly illuminated, presented a most animated appearance. A large number of
ladies, many of them in full dress, gave additional grace to the scene. For the gymnasts themselves the
occasion had a special interest, inasmuch as it had been selected for the presentation of the "diplomas"
which had been awarded to those who have distinguished themselves in various exercises during the
year. Major Bushby presided, and amongst those present were Sir John Jones, K. C. B, and party; Mr
Reginald Haigh and party, Mr Charles Langton and party, Mr F. Hornby and party, Mr A H., Lemonius and
party, Col M‘Corquodale and party, Mr Stolterfoht and party, Mr Mackay and party, Mr C. Stoess and party,
Mr G. Ross and party, Mr Rivers and party, &c.
Previous to the commencement of the proceedings, Mr P. B. Drinkwater, one of the leading directors, said
he was sorry to have to announce that Mr Hulley was unable to be present, owing to the recent death of a
near relative. His place as director of the exercises would be filled by Mons. Durbec (the professor of
fencing at the Gymnasium), and he (Mr Drinkwater) was sure it would be a great satisfaction to Mr Hulley
to hear that the exercises had been performed with the efficiency and alacrity displayed on previous
occasions.

1867 23 May - Liverpool Mercury - A GYMNASIUM FOR RUGBY
Physical education is rapidly assuming its proper position in the course at our first-class public schools.
Rugby is the latest example of this frank adhesion to the new athletic faith. At the tercentenary meeting
of the committee, held in London last week, it was decided that a gymnasium should be erected,. Sir
Philip Egerton and Mr. Reginald Cholmondeley were deputed to communicate with Mr. Hulley on the
subject.

1867 29 May - Liverpool Mercury - THE OLYMPIC FESTIVAL AND THE LADIES OF LIVERPOOL
The approaching Olympic Festival of the Athletics Society of Great Britain appears to have aroused quite
an unusual amount of interest among the inhabitants of Liverpool generally. Former ones have no
doubt achieved a success which amply proves the great and increasing attraction of such gatherings;
but the next, being the sixth annual festival, is to have a special and peculiar feature, which bids fair to
give it quite an exceptional character. Hitherto, the gentlemen have entirely monopolised the affair,
but this time the ladies are to give a proof of their faith in the good results of physical education. By
giving to the various classes of competitors all the medals, the cost of which has been collected
amongst themselves. Nothing could be better calculated to give a tone of refinement and elevation to a
festival of this description than for the ladies, "whose bright eyes rain influence and award the prize," to
take their are proper position as patronesses of the occasion. Nor is there the slightest reason to fear that
any gathering - for the good ordering of which Mr Hulley is responsible - will be marked by a single
incident that the most fastidious could object to. The numerous contests will be open to amateurs only,
Mr Hulley having taken the most stringent precautions that not only the "professional" but the "semi--
professional" element will be strictly excluded, and it is among these classes that disputes and
disturbances most frequently arise. Field.

1867 10 Jun - Liverpool Mercury - THE OLYMPIC FESTIVAL
One of the most promising signs of these times is the constantly increasing amount of attention devoted
to the cultivation of the bodily powers. With our young men than this "physical education," as it is very
appropriately called, finds an enthusiastic acceptance, and the undoubted importance of the subject
make this a very gratifying circumstance. The advantages of a systematic muscular cultivation are so
obvious, and like so much upon the surface, that their widely-spread recognition does not require any
very elaborate explanation. Nevertheless, it is too frequently the case that causes in themselves excel-
-lent fail through weak or mistaken advocacy, and the valuable results they might have produced can
only be reckoned among losses of the community.
Thanks, however, to Mr Hulley, the fate of the physical education theory has been much more fortunate;
and the effects of its working are not only palpably and appreciably important in the immediate present,
but promises still greater things for the future. For this condition of affairs, says a friend, we have to thank
Mr Hulley, and it is only the simplest justice that the fact should not have lost sight of in estimating our
gains. That the gains in question are something to be heartily thankful for, no one can for a moment
doubt who has visited the splendid establishment in Myrtle-street. If the spectator has witnessed the
exercises of the classes he will be still more ready to admit the claims of Mr Hulley to the gratitude of the
community; for what could be more inspiriting than the spectacle of so many young Englishmen in the
full enjoyment of nature's best gifts - health and vigour?
But in the admiration of Mr Hulley's good work, we must not forget our object, which is to direct the
attention of readers to the forthcoming display of some of the results of his labour. The sixth annual
olympic festival is fixed for the 28th and 29th of this month, and the gymnasiarch, ably seconded by his
lieutenants, Messrs J.B. Lee and W. D. Hogarth, is pushing forward the preparations with his accustom-
-ed vigour. That the scene will be a brilliant one is certain enough as far as the exertions of these gentle-
-men can secure that result, and there is every reason to anticipate that the sixth olympic festival will
distance all its predecessors. It will, as we said before, occupy two days on this occasion - an arrange-
-ment, which is likely to find great favour with the gentlemen who enter for the contests. The division of
the programme in this way has two immense advantages. In the first place, by conducting the gymnas-
-tic contests in the gymnasium on the evening of the 28th, it enables the competitors to work under the
most favourable circumstances. In the second place, it enables the gymnasiarch to issue a programme,
which is unique in its comprehensiveness. The ladies of Liverpool give the prizes, so there is sure to be
a fascinating assembly of the fair sex to give tone and refinement to the meeting.

1867 19 Jun - Sporting Life - ATHLETIC SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN -
This society will hold their Sixth Annual Olympic Festival at Liverpool, on Friday and Saturday, June 28
and 29, when the society’s gold, silver, and bronze medals will be offered for competition to gentlemen
amateurs. The programme includes a 120 yards, 220 yards, quarter-mile, half-mile, an d two miles flat
races, a 220 yards and quarter-mile hurdle races, a one mile steeple chase, and a four miles walking
match, high-leaping, wide-jumping, vaulting, pole-leaping, gymnastics, boxing, fencing, wrestling, put-
-ting 16lb shot, throwing 16lb hammer, throwing cricket-ball, singlestick, Indian club and dumbbell
exercises, &c., &c. One mile and 100 yards swimming races on Monday, July 1. For programmes,
rules, &c., apply to the hon. sec., Liverpool Gymnasium. John Hulley president; W. D. Hogarth and J. B.
Lee, hon. secs. The entries close on the 22nd inst.

1867 24 Jun - Liverpool Mercury - Advertisements
OLYMPIC FESTIVAL
28th and 29th June
THE ATHLETIC SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN
WILL CELEBRATE THEIR
SIXTH ANNUAL OLYMPIC FESTIVAL.
Under the direction of JOHN HULLEY, Esq.,
Gymnasiarch of Liverpool,
ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NEXT,
THE 28 AND 29th JUNE,
When the Society's Gold, Silver, and Bronze Medals,
presented by the
LADIES OF LIVERPOOL,
Will be contested for by Gentlemen Amateurs
--------------------
Through the kind permission of the directors of the Gymnasium,
who have placed the Institution at the disposal
of the Athletic Society on FRIDAY NEXT, the following
contests will come off in the Grand Hall:-
The gymnastic, fencing, boxing, wrestling, voting, broad
sword, Indian club, and dumb bell.
Chair to be taken at Seven o'clock. Carriages to be ordered for 9.00.
---------------------
On SATURDAY Next, THE 29th, JUNE,
the following contests will come off in the SHEIL PARK
ATHLETIC GROUNDS, which have been engaged by the
Athletic Society for their exclusive use on the above day:-
The 120 yards, 220 yards, quarter mile, half mile, mile, and
two mile flat races; 220 yards and a quarter mile hurdle
race; a mile steeplechase and a four mile walking match;
high and wide jumping, putting shot, throwing cricket ball,
throwing hammer, and pole-leaping; also, the deciding
contests in boxing and wrestling.
******************************************
OLYMPIC FESTIVAL
Tickets are now ready. May be obtained at the Gymnasium,
or at the principal shops. For the Gymnasium on the
Evening of the 28th: Unreserved 2s; Reserved,3s. Sheil
Park Athletic Grounds; Unreserved, 1s. Reserved, 2s. if
purchased before the 29th instant. On the Day: Unreserved,
1s. 6d, Reserved 2s. 6d.
J. B. LEE
W. D. HOGARTH Hon. Secs.
**************************************
OLYMPIC FESTIVAL
28 and 29th instant,
COSTUMES at the Liverpool Gymnasium Depot.
L. Y. & J. NATHAN'S, 4, HARDMAN-STREET.
********************
1867 26 Jun - Liverpool Daily Post - THE LIVERPOOL OLYMPIC FESTIVAL
This festival will be held on Friday and Saturday, at the Sheil Park Athletic Ground. If the present brilliant
weather should favour the occasion, there is litle doubt that an unparalleled success will be achieved by
Mr. Hulley. The wide-spread interest with which the event has been awaited is a sufficient endorsement
of the popularity to which the cause of physical educaton has attained. Mr. Hulley has done more to
promote the revival of this science, for such it really is, than, perhaps, any other gentleman in the
country; and the gratifying recognition which his efforts have received in Liverpool may be accepted as
an assurance that the public is fully awakened to the necessity of fixing the noble games of Greece as
an item in the routine of modern life. The anniversary of their revival this week will be an evidence of
their fixity, and that no fear ought be entertained that the people of England are at all apathetic on the
subject of muscular Christianity.
A larger number of entries have been received for this meeting than were ever taken in any former
years. Between 220 and 300 names have been sent in, and they include representative men from all
parts of the country as well as the names of some of the best known and most successful athletes of the
day. Some of the most conspicuous names are - Messrs. c. J. Emery, London; M. E. Jobling, Burras
Bridge; Hugo Lundsberger , Bremen; W. MacLaren, Manchester ; R. J. Mitchell, Stacksteads; C. W.
Beardsall, Huddersfield; J. E. Frail, Shrewsbury; W. Taylor, London; J. Stone, Newton; J. Duckworth,
Haslingden; Sydney Hyde, Dukinfield; J. G. Elliott, London; A. Bradley, Huddersfield; F. C. Wylde,
Sheffield; W. Long, London; J. A. Harwood, London; C. J. Helliday, Alderley Edge; J. Hotengeur, Paris;
and A. C. Williams, Woolwich.

1867 29 Jun - Liverpool Mercury - ATHLETIC SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN - ANNUAL PRIZE COMPETITION
Last evening, the sixth annual Olympic Festival of the Athletic Society of Great Britain commenced at the
Liverpool Gymnasium, Myrtle-Street, and will be continued to-day in the Sheil Park Athletic Grounds.
The Festival this year, to judge from the programme and the entries, promises to be one of the most
successful that has yet taken place. The number of competitors who have entered their names exceeds
that of any previous year, and the list includes some of the best amateur gymnasts in the kingdom.
There are competitors from Paris, Marseilles, London, a large contingent from Manchester, and most of
the Northern counties are represented. It is, in fact, quite a national competition, and the results will
excite interest far beyond the limits of the locality in which the friendly contest takes place. Seventy-two
medals - eight of gold, 32 of silver, and 32 of bronze are offered for competition, and the fact that they
have been subscribed for by ladies should heighten the value of these prizes in the estimation of the
winners. They are in the form of a Maltese cross, with the figure of an athlete in the centre, and the motto
of the Athletic Society inscribed above, "Mens sana in corpore sano." The medals were supplied from
the establishment of Mr Mayor.
A preliminary evening competition is an innovation upon the arrangements of previous occasions, but
the increasing interest attaching to these gatherings, the extension of the programme, and the greater
number of competitors, made it impossible to get through the work at all satisfactorily in one day. Two
or three competitions are compelled to be carried on at the same time, and, while the attention of the
spectators was distracted from one thing to another, the competitors themselves became fagged.
The time has come, indeed, when two entire days must be devoted to the competition. Last night's
experience proved that nothing less will do. It was impossible to get through the work in the time
specified, and the proceedings were not concluded till a much later hour than was anticipated. In every
other particular, a most favourable inauguration was given to the festival.
There can be no question about the superiority of the athletic temple in Myrtle-street, as the field of
contest for purely gymnastic exercises, over any extemporised place of performance. The spectators at
any rate could see what was going on infinitely better and the competitors could show off their skill to
greater advantage. There was a very large number of visitors, and the ladies - when will they have their
Olympic Festivals? - mustered in strong force. The veteran Sir John Jones was present, and amongst
gentlemen were to be recognized most of the principal medical men of the town, whose adhesion to the
cause of physical training will help to remove many prejudices. Outside and inside, the building had
been made gay with an abundance of flags, and when, at seven o'clock, Mr Hulley, as the President of
the Athletic Association, took his seat in the centre gallery, with a bevy of ladies on each side, the
splendid hall looked charming in more senses than one. The competitors having assembled upon the
floor of the hall,
MR HULLEY said - Ladies and gentlemen, it has been the custom at former festivals to open the pro-
-ceedings with a few remarks from the chairman. I follow the custom on this occasion, because it has
some very apparent advantages. The mistakes or excesses of indiscreet or ignorant advocates can be
detached; a falsehood and exaggeration of open opposition can be exposed. We may also cherish a
hope that the still more dangerous apathy, which yet exists on the subject so important maybe increas-
-ingly replaced by a healthy feeling. I rejoice to say that the last-mentioned advantage is being almost
daily secured at a steadily advancing rate. Physical education is the great fact of the 19th century. The
first opposition to it has sunk from the general to the individual. The nation has accepted it. Its advo-
-cates can therefore afford to despise the feeble enmity of scattered and divided theorists and satirists.
Can it be said that this is an overstatement? Have we not before our eyes in this building, a signal
proof of its truth? But look, if you will, beyond its walls and you will easily find proofs still more convinc-
- ing. All over the country, athletic festivals are being celebrated; and these afford evidence of which it
is impossible to mistake the bearing. They must convince every unbiased mind that we are only just
entering upon a new phase of national development. The opposition to it at the outset was general, it
has now become individual; that the physique of the people, too long left to the mercies of chance, will
in the future assume its proper position as a subject of the first importance.
May the time soon come when weakly, misshapen men, and sickly, hysterical women will be the
exception and not the rule among the inhabitants of our towns and cities. We may not hope to rival
physical glories of classic times, but we can do something towards that end, and I rejoice that we are in
so fair a way of succeeding. The most striking evidence of this is the fact that in this country those
journals that are the most eminent of culture, breadth of thought, and classical taste, and consequently
the most influential amongst the educated classes, and are also the most prominent and persistent in
their advocacy of the great physical reform movement. I must pause for a moment at this point for the
purpose of uttering a warning. Warnings are not so pleasant as congratulations, but they are sometimes
indispensable; as they are on this occasion. I would caution all, whom it may concern to beware of
excessive exercise. This caution, too, concerns others as long as those most directly interested; for
discredit is brought on the cause of physical education itself by such excesses. The opponents of this
movement, confuted by fact and experience on every ground of their opposition, have not failed to light
upon the one weak point, which the infancy of our undertaking, has left open to their attacks; they
assert that our object is the training of acrobats and mountebanks. Now, it might easily be shown that
the low estimation in which professional acrobats have come to be held is in no degree owing to any-
-thing contemptible in their performances; for at that period in the history of this world when the art of
physical discipline was infinitely better understood than by its present detractors, such performances
were accounted highly honourable. But owing to the degeneracy of bodily habit, physical capacities,
which by right should be at the command of every healthy man, have been left to the cultivation of a
class, and thus dissevered from their connection with the training of the other powers of man from
which they in former days borrowed their dignity and attractiveness.
Still, I must be allowed to say that our noble cause is not greatly promoted by those who practise alone
these exercises, which may be called "acrobatic." The members of this gymnasium know well the class
of practices to which I refer, and I need scarcely say that by acrobatic exercises I do not mean these
which are merely showy. No objection can be made to these, if other and more serious considerations
are not neglected. The important point is that men should study their constitutions. If this is done intel-
-ligently in the first instance, it is scarcely possible to go wrong. The man originally weak, who subjects
himself to a discipline founded on this study, is the man who generally ends by excelling those endowed
with greater muscular advantages. It is for this reason alone, I wish to impress upon you the supreme
necessity of having an object in your exercise. That object should be in every case the cultivation of a
fair and equal balance of muscular power. The aim is to produce the highest possible average of
physical perfection. Such an aim cannot be forwarded by rare examples of one-sided cultivation They
act, on the contrary, as a discouragement to a large class of persons whose attendance here it is most
desirable to secure. I mean those who are not strong, but can be made strong; men and women who
can be developed into creditable special of humanity by regular and systematic training: Such an object
is definite enough and its attainment is just as easy. It is not, I repeat, the man with inherited strength but
the man of inherited weakness who has most to hope from the exercises of the gymnasium. This is a
fact, and it cannot be too widely known or too often insisted upon. I say, therefore, to such of you who
are unduly anxious to excel in one particular branch, you are making a serious mistake and I hope you
will soon discover. That it is so. To you who preserve a proper balance in the proportion of your
exercises and their intention, I say- go on and prosper. You are the pioneers of an army which will soon
follow in your track, an army of healthy English manhood.
Let me not be misunderstood, however, in what I have just said. I should be sorry to convey the imp-
-ression to any one that I wished to underrate the importance of such a display as this. What I desire to
impress upon you is that Olympic festivals are not the end of physical education. Physical education, or
rather its dissemination, is the end. Olympic festivals are the means of securing that end. They must
be judged by their after effect, not their immediate results. They are evidence of the good done, but not
the whole evidence. To find that we must take a vast number of cases which never obtain any promin-
-ence at all. These I consider most valuable, for the reasons already given. I am nonetheless grateful,
however, to the gentleman who will have come forward on this occasion, to stimulate others by the
display of the proficiency. I thank them on behalf of the people of Liverpool for their public spirit, and I
am more than content to leave the reputation of physical education in their hands.
Pardon me if I glance for a moment at the past, and recall the obstacles so far, triumphantly overcome.
Pardon me again, if I say that the most formidable of these obstacles was found in that slowness of
grasp which is distinctive of the average British mind. Intellectual eminence was easily appreciated
even when its work was only partially understood - witness the popularity of Mill. Physical eminence
was both appreciated and understood; witness the excitement about Sayers. But the union and recip-
-rocal action of mental and physical power was quite a new idea for the vast majority of people.
That a man should be morally strong was a truism. That a man's moral strength could be affected in any
degree by the condition of his body was a heresy. That an unsound physical state could be considered
as actually immoral for no other reason than its unsoundness, was an outrage. I do not assert that this
view of the case is yet entirely upset, but the revolution of opinion is gathering force. The religion of the
body, as a complement and assistant of the religion of the soul, has hitherto been the dream of philos-
-ophers. We, I am convinced, are destined to see it practically realised and doing noble work for the
nation and for humanity. That time, I repeat, is coming; not as a reign of brute force, but as a period
when brute force will be rendered powerless for evil when it will be overwhelmed beneath the combined
forces of intellect and strength; when the majesty of manhood as the sacred temple of an eternal
principle will be recognized, and with it, the necessity of keeping that temple of free from both the
defilements basenesses of physical weakness.
Of such physical religion as this, the building in which we stand may be at the present time a fitting
temple, but it cannot remain so long. At our present rate of progress we shall soon get far beyond such
contracted limits. Towards the hastening of that consummation it is the duty of every one to assist. When
the vast importance of the subject has obtained practical recognition, the inadequacy of this building will
be considered ridiculous. It seems, in fact, to present itself in that aspect now, when we compare the vast
sums spent upon objects and institutions of nothing like the same public value. Where, I might ask, is the
artistic embellishment which could find no more fitting display than in a palace of health? In a building
devoted to such an object might we not naturally expect to find the highest class of ornament, lavishly
used?
There is an inevitable relation between beauty and strength. Strength is always beautiful, though beauty,
unfortunately, is not always strong. Where do we find that relation illustrated here? We can certainly
boast the beauty of simplicity; but in that higher charm which only a congenial artistic genius could
supply we are woefully deficient. But we may console ourselves with the reflection that in these days the
public voice when it is unanimous is irresistible. All the rest must follow sooner or later. In the meantime,
we must, each in his particular sphere, Labour is zealously to push forward the great cause of physical
education.
Once more, then, and I bid you, gentlemen, hearty welcome to our six Olympic festival. Many of you
have come from a distance, and thus given a striking proof of your devotion to what I repeat, is a great
cause. To you, therefore, a special acknowledgement is due, and I'm happy to offer it emphatically.
Before this brilliant gathering. The ladies I am glad to see around me were at a new triumph to success,
and console you under an honourable defeats. In this friendly contest victor and vanquished enjoy an
equal degree of consideration.
Immediately after the address, which was well received, the competition was proceeded with, and
continued until after 11 o'clock.

1867 02 Jul - Birmingham Daily Post - Athletics at Liverpool.
One or two of the successful competitors at the recent meeting of the National Olympian Association in
this town proved equally fortunate at the Olympic Festival held at Liverpool at the close of last week.
They were altogether 220 entries for this meeting, which was presided over by Mr Hulley

1867 02 Sep - Liverpool Mercury -LLANDUDNO CARNIVAL
On Thursday last eight grand carnival was held at Llandudno under the direction of a committee of
visitors, headed by Mr Hulley. During the day, as the programme has it, "in order to restore a light on the
evenings amusements, a bazaar for the sale of Chinese lanterns was extemporised on the parade." At a
little after 8 p.m., a grand procession of boats, illuminated all over - rigging them astern - with lanterns
and coloured fire, was started from the landings steps.

1867 07 Sep - Wrexham Advertiser -CARNIVAL AT LLANDUDNO -
This fashionable watering place is now very full of visitors, and the demand for both in-door and out-door
amusements is, consequently very great. A novel and most interesting fete took place there on Thurs-
-day evening week, under the management of a committee of visitors, with Mr. John Hulley as honorary
secretary. It was announced as a carnival, and from the novelty of its features, and the spirited manner
in which it was carried out, it seemed fully to justify the designation.
During the day, and in the early part of the evening, some ladies, who appeared to have entered into the
matter with much earnestness, presided at stalls on the “parade,” and disposed of an immense number
of Chinese lanterns, of various shapes, dimensions, and colours, preparatory to a grand illumination,
which was to form one of the principal features in the fete at a late hour. As darkness came on a great
number of houses fronting the bay was profusely illuminated. Almost every visitor upon the promenade
had a lantern, so that shortly after eight o clock thousands of lanterns were moving about in the long-
stretching promenade, making the scene of great brilliance, novelty and gaiety. Between eight and
nine o’ clock a grand procession of beautifully illuminate boats, headed by Brough’s excellent band,
crossed from the west-side of the bay to nearly opposite Gloddaeth-crescent, where the band played
several popular pieces, and several English and Welsh songs were sung by the boating parties in
excellent style, after which the boats returned to their starting point and disembarked their occupants. A
procession of visitors, bearing lanterns, was then formed, and marched across a portion of the adjacent
mountain - the Great Orme’s Head - to the Archery Ground, where a miscellaneous entertainment was
given. As the procession ascended the side of the mountain, the parties bearing aloft their Chinese
lanterns, and guided in their course by the light of coloured fires, the scene was exceedingly pictures-
-que as viewed from the bay beneath. A grand display of fireworks on the Parade concluded the
proceedings of this interesting and novel fete. The evening was beautifully fine, and the sight as
enjoyed by an immense number of spectators.

1867 21 Sep - Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle
PUBLICATIONS
NEW WORKS ON GYMNASTICS
Illustrated with nearly 900 woodcuts, price 8s. 6d.
A HANDBOOK of GYMNASTICS and ATHLETICS. By E.G. RAVENSTEIN, F.R.G.S&c. President of the
G.G.S London; and JOHN HULLEY, Gymnasiarch of Liverpool.
Also,
The GYMNASIUM and its FITTINGS. Being an Illustrated Description of Gymnastic Apparatus, covered
and open-air Gymnasia. Thirty-eight wood-cuts, and 143 figures on 14 plates. By E.G. RAVENSTEIN
and JOHN HULLEY. Price 2s. 6d.
Triibner and Co. 60, Paternoster-row, London.

1867 09 Oct - Liverpool Mercury - LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM
Mr Hulley has introduced chorus singing as part of his curriculum at the above institution. In a brief
address to the members last evening, he recommended its practice as a most effective means of
strengthening the chest and vocal organs, stating that it had been adopted in the continental gymnasia
and the most satisfactory results attained.

1867 Oct 10 - Daily News -
From Mr E. G. Ravenstein, President of the German Gymnastic Society, London, and Mr John Hulley,
Gymnasiarch of Liverpool, we receive a Handbook of Gymnastics and Athletics (Trubner and Co.), with
numerous woodcut illustrations from original designs. We must content ourselves with handing over
the volume to those who desire to excel in physical exercises.

1867 29 Oct - Liverpool Mercury - GYMNASTICS & ATHLETICS
In-depth review of A HANDBOOK of GYMNASTICS and ATHLETICS. By E.G.RAVENSTEIN, F.R.G.S &c.
President of the G.G.S London; and JOHN HULLEY, Gymnasiarch of Liverpool.

1867 30 Oc - Liverpool Mercury Local News - The gymnasiarch and the Essayist.
Mr John Hulley, the "gymnasiarch," was sued yesterday, in the county court, before Mr J. K. Blair, the
judge, by Mr John Harrison, a medical gentleman, of Congleton, for recovery of £5. His Honour enquired
what the £5 had been incurred for.
Plaintiff: For 70 copies of an essay on physical education.
His Honour: Did you write this essay?
Plaintiff: Yes.
His Honour: Did you get Mr. Hulley to take a number of copies?
Plaintiff: yes.
His Honour: how many?
Plaintiff:£5 worth. I sent him 70.
His Honour: For the £5?
Plaintiff: I have a letter acknowledging their receipt.
His Honour. Did you apply for the money,?
Plaintiff: Yes, there is no question that the defendant has disposed of them, because they were ordered
before they were received.
His Honour: Have you
made a personal application for the money?
Plaintiff said he had not, and explained, as a reason for not doing so, that he lived at a distance from
Liverpool - on the borders of Staffordshire and Cheshire.
His Honour: Have you never written to the defendant?
Plaintiff said he had, frequently.
His Honour: Mr Hulley is not here?
Mr Hime (registrar): No sir. He has not taken the slightest notice of it.
A verdict was given for the plaintiff, for the amount claimed, with costs.

1867 30 Oct - Liverpool Daily Post - THE GYMNASIARCH IN THE COUNTY COURT
An action was brought in the County Court yesterday, before Mr. J.K. Blair, judge, by Dr. John Harrison, of
Congleton, against Mr. John Hulley, the gymnasiarch, to recover the sum of £5. The defendant did not
appear.
The plaintiff said he wrote an essay on “Physical Education” of which Mr. Hulley agreed to, and did
receive 70 copies for sale, and for which he was to pay £5. The book was sold for 2s. Plaintiff had
received a letter from the defendant acknowledging the receipt of the books and he thought there
could be no doubt that they had since be sold, inasmuch as they all had been previously ordered of him.
He had applied to Mr. Hulley for payment, but the money had not been forthcoming; he had not made
any personal application to the gymnasiarch, but had written several letters to him, all of which remain-
-ed unanswered.
His Honour said the contract appeared to have been an absolute engagement to take 70 copies of the
work for £5 , and he must, therefore, give the plaintiff a verdict for that amount together with costs.

1867 05 Nov - Liverpool Daily Post - LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM COMPANY LIMITED
The annual general meeting of the shareholders in this company was held at noon, yesterday, in the
Common Hall, Hackins-hey. Mr. Langton (chairman of the board of directors) presided, and the
following other gentlemen were also present:- Messrs. Houghton, Delarue, Holt, Steel, Forget, Stolter,
Hulley, Finlay, Lee, Harrison, Thompson, Hornby, P. Rathbone, Litchfield, Gibbons, R. Rathbone,
Allender, Macrae, and Bateson. The report of the directors, which was taken as read, was as follows:-
The directors regret that there are no funds available for dividend this year, as owing to the depression
which has for so long a time prevailed in this town the receipts of the company, especially from evening
members, have not unnaturally suffered: it is, however, satisfactory to state that the depreciation fund
has been credited with the same per centage as in the previous year and now stands at £425 15s 5d.
The accounts, which Mr. G. B. Thomason has again kindly audited, show that the total receipts to credit
of this year are £1,630 4s 3d, and the disbursement’s (including provision for depreciation) £1,613 11s
10d, leaving a small balance on the year’s working of £16 12s 5d; this, with the surplus of £42 12s 2d
after paying of dividend last year, leaves £59 4s 7d to the credit of profit and loss, which the directors
recommend should be carried forward to next year.
In order to give increased interest and efficiency to the ladies classes, the receipts from which have
materially improved, the directors have engaged the services of a lady assistant, and trust the appoint -
-ment will be agreeable to the subscribers. The directors desire cordially to acknowledge Mr. Hulley’s
services in the management of the various classes, as also the constant care given to the interests of
the company by the secretary Mr. T. W. Read. This year the following directors retire by rotation:-
Messrs T. Brocklebank, Hugh Finlay, T. F. Grimsdale, J. R. Jeffery, C. P. Melly, and J. E. Delarue, all of
whom seek re-election with the exception of Mr. Jeffrey, who resigns his seat, offer themselves for re-
election. From the statement of account, it appeared that there was a reserve fund in bank, for in-
vestment, £425 15s 5d, and the balance otherwise in bank amounted to £136 17s 1d.
The Chairman, in rising to move the adoption of the report and statement of accounts, said that the
report explained the main features of the operation of the company during the past year. The
shareholders would see that the directors did not propose to declare a dividend, and they had given a
reason for the adoption of this course. He (the chairman) might further explain that the deficiency in the
receipts, representing nearly £300, arose from a decrease in the attendance of evening members; but,
on the other hand, the directors had to point out, with some satisfaction, to an increase in the numbers
of ladies attending the ladies’ classes. The depression which had existed during the past year exp-
-lained, he (the chairman) though, very satisfactorily, how it was that the number of evening members
had fallen off; and he was afraid that, as long as that depression existed, the directors must still look for
diminished receipts.
The young men who attended the gymnasium in the evening were mostly employed in offices, and
there were many of them at the present time merely spectators who during the past year were partic-
-ipators in th exercises. He was sorry to have to state that, because it was a privation to the young men
themselves and a prejudice to the company. At the same time, the company must look to the
attendance of these young men, even as spectators, as a sign that, as soon as things recover some-
-what, they might hope to see them again amongst the numbers of their members.
The ladies’ classes had opened this year under somewhat altered arrangements. The directors had
appointed a lady assistant who would have, under Mr. Hulley, the general supervision and direction of
the ladies’ classes; and the directors believed that that would be an arrangement which would be
agreeable to the ladies who attend the classes. The directors still further believed that the appointment
they had made was a good one. Other ladies attended the gymnasium for ther purpose of qualifying
themselves for giving assistance in the gymnasium, should the support the directors received prove
sufficient to induce them to engage their services. In the meantime the ladies referred to were qualify-
-ing themselves , if not for gymnasium purposes, at all events for the advancement of the physical
training for which the gymnasium had been established. Therefore, the directors believed that they
had done right in encouraging the ladies to qualify themselves.
In the conduct of the exercise during the past year, he (the chairman) could refer with satisfation to the
assistance the leaders had given to the directors and to Mr. Hulley; and he might also endorse what
was stated in the report - that the directors had reason to be satisfied with the manner in which Mr.
Hulley had conducted the exercises in the gymnasium. He (the chairman) might also mention, as
regarded the accounts on the debit side, that the directors had gone to considerable expense in the
matter of music, but that expense they did not propose to continue on the same scale as before, for
they believed they might make certain alterations in that respect which would be to the advantage of
their pockets and would not at the same time detract from the efficiency of the exercises.
For the past year the directors had paid the mortgage interest in full for the year, and they had suffered
somewhat by an increase in the assessment upon the gymnasium, consequently their taxes were
somewhat increased, but in no other respect was there anything material to call attention to, except,
perhaps, in the depreciation fund. Although the directors were not in a position to declare a dividend, a
sum had been placed to the credit of the fund in the same manner as last year. The directors felt it was
most desirable to maintain that fund, and, that it ought to receive the benefit of any surplus that existed.
Consequently the directors had allowed 17½ per cent for depreciation on apparatus, and 10 per for
depreciation on furniture. There remained a balance over and above all outlay, including the amount
brought forward last year, of £59 4s 7d; and the deprecation fund now stood at £425 15s 5d, which
sum would be invested specially.
The accounts had been audited by Mr. Thompson, who had kindly performed the same work for two
years. Mr. Read, the secretary, had also given the directors most valuable assistance, and they felt
that they were greatly indebted to him for this, because any remuneration they were able to give him
fell far short of the amount of trouble he took, and the attention he most zealously gave to the interests
of the gymnasium. Having named the directors who retired by rotation, the chairman said that the
directors proposed to nominate Mr. D. C. Keeling, one of the most attentive members, and a leader of
the gymnasium, in place of Mr. Jeffrey, who resigned his seat. That would draw the ties between the
practical members of the gymnasium and the board, who were for the main part non-practical, still
closer, for Mr. Drinkwater was at present their only real practical member; and Mr. Keeling, he (the
chairman) had no doubt, together with Mr. Drinkwater, would give Mr. Hulley considerable assistance
in carrying on the business of the gymnasium within its walls.
In conclusion, the chairman said that they had opened the year very fairly, all things considered. They
had received £565, and he was glad to say that the ladies’ classes had increased. The directors were
also in communication with some schools, and were ready to form classes whenever any number of
ladies presented themselves to form a class. In fact the directors only wanted encouragement to form
any number of classes, and they hoped that that branch of their exercises would be prosecuted with
vigour. It would be a great advantage if they could get schools to attend the gymnasium, and they
would endeavour to accomplish that object.
Mr. Houghton seconded the adoption of the report and statement of accounts, and the proposition was
carried unanimously;
Mr. Steel moved, and Mr. Le seconded, “That the thanks of the shareholders be given to Mr. G. B.
Thompson for auditing the accounts, and that he be appointed auditor for the ensuing year.” Carried
unanimously.
Mr. Hulley proposed that Messrs. T. Brocklebank, Hugh Finlay, T. F. Grimsdale, C. P. Melly, J. A.
Delarue, and D. C. Keeling be appointed directors. Mr. Forget seconded the motion, which was
carries unanimously.
The usual vote of thanks to the chairman closed the proceedings.

1867 23 Nov - Liverpool Daily Post - THE ASSAULT-AT-ARMS -
TO THE EDITOR OF THE DAILY POST - SIR,
I hope you will allow me through your valuable columns to explain a circ-umstance that took place at the
recent assault-at-arms, which was as uncalled for as it was ungentlemanly. By way of preface it will be
necessary for me to state that I was one of the oldest, if not the eldest member of the Athletic Club about
to take part in the assault-at-arms; and although I had taken part in every assault given at the Gymnas-
-ium since the opening, I have only, on one occasion, had my name put upon the printed programmes,
it always being a recognised rule that all leaders were allowed to takepart in the assaults. Nor did it rest
with being a rule, for on all previous occasions such was the case; not only so, but my name was enter-
-ed in the list of competitors; but why it was not upon the programme Mr. Hulley would be better able to
explain.
The circumstances referred to was while myself and several others., whose names did not appear
publicly, were about to take part in the exercises on the parallel bars, I unluckily being the first, Mr.
Hulley, after allowing me to get upon the bars, called out before the whole audience that my name was
not on the programme; consequently I had to ignominiously retire during very demonstrative and un-
-mistakeable sounds of disapprobation from the audience.
Why could we not be privately informed that the management of the assault-at-arms was to differ from
the last? It was an act of courtesy we were entitled to. But I suppose that Mr. Hulley was too glad of an
opportunity for publicly displaying his love of discipline; but he ought not to forget that gentlemen
expect from gentlemen gentlemanly conduct, and that their feelings should not be sacrificed with
impunity to Mr. Hulley’s ambition for public approbation.
I am, sir, yours respectfully, GEORGE HUTCHIN
34 St. John’s-lane, Nov 20, 1867 .

1867 09 Dec - Liverpool Daily Post - PHYSICAL EDUCATION -
A gymnasium has been erected at Falmouth. It will be formally opened by the Mayor, Mr. Webber, on
Wednesday next. It is intended for the use of ladies and youths during the day, and for gentlemen in the
evening. Mr. Hulley has, at the request of the Mayor, forwarded full particulars of the working of our gym-
-nasium for their guidance.

1867 10 Dec - Liverpool Mercury - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM
Amongst the visitors to this institution was M. Mauritz Rubenson, the Swedish writer. This gentleman is
well known for the warm interest he takes in physical education, some most able articles having been
written by him on the subject. He has just returned from America, where he has been for the purpose of
inspecting the principal gymnasia and public schools. He expressed the great gratification derived from
witnessing a class practice, and spoke in the highest terms of Mr Hulley's system, stating that the
Liverpool Gymnasium was the most complete of its kind in existence.

1867 24 Dec - Daily News - LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM
Upwards of 1000 ladies, together with about 30 of the leading medical men of Liverpool, assembled at
the gymnasium on Saturday evening last for the purpose of witnessing a series of exercises gone
through by a large number of the members of the ladies classes, and illustrative of the class practice. Dr
Grimsdale presided, and at the termination of the exercises delivered an address on the importance of
physical education for women. Addresses were also delivered by Dr Nevins, Dr Hakes, and Dr Denton,
&c. At the close of the proceedings a vote of thanks was proposed and passed unanimously to Mr
Hulley, the able director of the institution.

1868 17 Feb - Liverpool Mercury -DISHONEST PRACTICES AT THE GYMNASIUM
TO THE EDITORS OF THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY
Gentlemen - The many comments which have been made both in the public prints, and in private with
regard to certain losses which have been suffered by members of the Gymnasium render it desirable
that some further explanation should be made on the subject.
That the property of members has been in some few instances purloined is unfortunately true but I have
yet to learn that any place of public resort was or ever could be kept entirely free from the malpractices
of dishonest persons. It is notorious that our most prominent institutions - nay, even our places of wor-
-ship - are not sacred from the presence of individuals impecunious and unscrupulous; it is even
whispered that on a late occasion, when the elite of Liverpool were assembled to do honour to royalty
itself, no means can be found of effectually restraining the energies of certain of the light-fingered
gentry. The number of persons, members and visitors, who have entered the Gymnasium since its
establishment is simply enormous, the daily average being upwards of a thousand; and these, it must
be remembered, consisting almost exclusively of the middle and higher classes of society. One of the
first points of interest to strangers, besides being in the evening, a favourite resort of large numbers
of ladies and gentlemen, resident in Liverpool and neighbourhood, it is to be feared that no amount of
care or supervision could entirely prevent the occasional intrusion of this dishonest persons. Every
facility is, however, given to members for the protection of their property; and those who persist, after
repeated cautions, in leaving watches and jewellery insufficiently protected, are merely offering a
premium to and encouraging the practice of theft. It is this class of persons, in fact, who are the
primary cause of losses, owing to the temptations which they afford to the unscrupulous.
Although I believe that were the boxes used by members all secured by good locks and keys, little or no
peculation would be practicable, I may state that the sergeant in the hall is always ready to take charge
of any valuables that members may choose to deposit with him.
The custom of leaving money and watches in the pockets of garments thrown carelessly about became
so prevalent that I was compelled some time ago to publish a notice imposing the forfeiture of subs-
-cription on those who persisted in the practice, and afterwards complained of having lost property.
Touching Mr McCartney's remarks as to the admission of members, the same want of thought, which
led to the loss he suffered has doubtless caused him to forget that the printed by-laws expressly
referred to "gentlemen", who may wish to join. Every applicant comes in personal contact with me, and
supporters of the gymnasium are all drawn from the educated classes, from our first professional and
mercantile men to the tradesman, or his assistant; the appearance and conduct of a gentleman being
imperative (together with strict obedience to the regulations laid down) on all who attend.
I will only add that by a moderate amount of prudence and discretion on the part of some few members
such unpleasant occurrences as the extraction of watches, &., might be prevented, as long as all the
consequent annoyance which is suffered by that large majority who do not expose themselves to such
losses.
Yours, &c., JOHN HULLEY, Gymnasiarch of Liverpool,
Gymnasium, Feb. 15, 1868.

1868 21 Feb - Liverpool Mercury -DISHONEST PRACTICES AT THE GYMNASIUM
TO THE EDITORS OF THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY
Gentlemen - When I wrote to you on a former occasion, I did so merely with the object of warning mem-
-bers of the Gymnasium in particular, and the public in general, of the dangers which are to be met with
in the institution from the malpractices of certain dishonest individuals, and to point out to the directors
the necessity of greater precaution in the admission of numbers. Mr Hulley’s precautions (as seen in
your issue of Monday) sound ludicrous in the extreme: "Every applicant comes into personal contact
with him" (?); he sees at a glance who belong to the educated classes of society; no vulgar pickpocket
has a chance under the glance of his scrutinising eye; all who pass him are "educated gentleman,"
and yet somehow or other the light-fingered gentry do get in, as past events have shown. I found it the
easiest thing imaginable to become a member: I gave my name and address, paid by subscription,
got my receipt and from that moment was to consider myself (according to Mr Hulley’s statement), an
“educated gentleman” as none but “educated gentlemen“ are admitted. My opinion is, that so long as
these extraordinary precautions be taken in admitting members there need be no surprise that some
of Mr Hulley's "educated gentlemen" occasionally take the curious freak of mistaking other people's
watches, &, for their own.
One word more. Mr Hulley appears to be labouring under the delusion that I'd left my watch
unprotected; he accuses me of having shown "want of thought.” Perhaps I may be allowed to state
exactly in what this want of thought consisted. I placed my watch and chain carefully in my box - lock -
-ed it, and put the key in my pocket. On my return, after about an hour's absence I found the box open
and watch and chain, minus. If Mr Hulley calls this "want of thought," his ideas of sort must be very
vague and uncertain. He is perfectly right in saying that some of the members seem very careless
about their valuables, but I do not happen to belong to this class, and Mr Hulley evidently made a
mistake when he accused me of having shown a "want of thought." In fact, the same "want of thought"
which led to Mr Hulley to say that the supporters of the gymnasium are all "educated gentlemen"
caused him to class me amongst the thoughtless.
Yours, &c., R. H. McCartney. 23, Liffey-street.

1868 03 Mar - Liverpool Mercury -DISHONEST PRACTICES AT THE GYMNASIUM
TO THE EDITORS OF THE LIVERPOOL MERCURY
Gentlemen - I must again in trouble you with a few words on the subject, as Mr McCartney, and possibly
some few other individuals of his mental calibre, will otherwise labour under the mistaken impression
that by the use of a "common" lock, which Mr McCartney admitted to me he used (although previously
warned to be careful), the ordinary rules of common sense may be laid aside, and property left to the
mercy of unscrupulous persons.
In reply to the question, which Mr McCartney asked in your columns, I would suggest to persons of his
stamp, who evidently find the responsibility of taking care of a watch or purse almost too great a strain
on their faculties, the engagement of competent nurses or keepers, to be chosen not by themselves but
by their own natural guardians. it is satisfactory, however, to find that individuals of his type form but a
very insignificant fraction of our members. Mr McCartney, in his letter, makes the following assertion-
"Depend upon it, until Mr Hulley blows his own trumpet, with something more of a definite sound in
answer to this question, members will be of the opinion that the best way of ensuring the safety
of their valuables will be to leave them at home, and stay themselves to keep them company." He might
at the same time have informed us how a member could "leave his valuables at home, and stay
himself and keep them company." I must again reiterate that, in my opinion, good efficient locks on
boxes placed in the dressing rooms would be found perfectly efficacious; but it is only too certain that
where foolish or careless individuals are to be found, knaves will soon make their appearance. As to Mr
McCartney's proposition to place a policeman in charge of each box, I should have treated it, had it
come from any other source, as a feeble attempt at witticism, inasmuch as it would be necessary to
monopolise the services of the whole force of the town, from Major Greig downward.
Since the opening of the gymnasium. Its value has been universally recognized, and upwards of
200,000 people have visited it; the present average attendance being about 700 visitors, and from 200 to
300 pupils per diem. From the nature of the proceedings here, involving a complete chains of dress in
the great majority of cases, valuables are of necessity removed for a time from the immediate possess-
-ion of their owners; and even in the proportionately few instances that have occurred of loss, I have
almost invariably proved them to result from carelessness. With the large number of members, and the
facilities afforded for the admission of the public (in accordance with the general wish of the subscribers),
it is of course impossible to guard against the occasional intrusion of a dishonest person, let the amount
of supervision or care exercise being what it may. I again repeat that, although no responsibility is
assumed by the directors, a sergeant in the hole has always been provided with a jewel box for the
custody of any articles lodged with him. Considering the large number of people at frequenting the
gymnasium, the depositing in safekeeping of any articles of value, could hardly be deemed an unreas-
-onable precaution.
In taking leave of this subject, I'm proud to be a witness to the almost universal good feeling and
harmony that prevails among very numerous body, who support the gymnasium; and I may add that Mr
McCartney, although his letter would lead to a different inference, still appears to appreciate the value of
the exercises and of associating with gentlemen, and he has by his punctuality and attention to our
regulations since his loss proved himself to be far from insensible to the merits of an institution, which is
certainly the first of its class in every respect.
Trusting that Mr McCartney will no longer complain that I have "blown my trumpet" with an uncertain
sound, I am, &c.,
JOHN HULLEY, Gymnasiarch of Liverpool.
Gymnasium, Feb.29, 1868.
My apology for thus trespassing on your valuable space must be my earnest desire to ventilate fully
any incidents relating to the management of this institution, whether of an agreeable nature or
otherwise.

1868 21 Jul - Liverpool Mercury - THE GYMNASIA OF LIVERPOOL, AMERICA, AND THE CONTINENT.
It is very satisfactory indeed to the inhabitants of Liverpool, to be informed by an American - of all the
people in the world - that they have in their town the most complete gymnasium which has yet been built,
and Mr Hulley, the gymnasiarch, will no doubt be as much pleased as his pupils with the words of Mr
Avon C. Burnham, the proprietor of a gymnasium in Brookland, North America, who is at present in town,
and has wandered over England and the continent on an errand of examination into the arrangements of
various popular gymnasia in France, Germany, Belgium and other places.
Last evening, Mr Burnham appeared at the Liverpool Gymnasium in Myrtle-Street, and after instructing a
class made a few observations in reference to the different athletic schools throughout the world. Address
-ing a numerous attendance of a ladies and gentlemen, and also the members of the gymnasium, he
said that he had been the proprietor of an establishment of that kind in New York, but the corporation had
taken his ground, and he had removed to Brookland. Prior to completing his new establishment, he
thought it advisable to visit the various gymnasia in the Old World, and the first he saw was the one in
which he then stood - the Liverpool Gymnasium (Applause.)
After going through the list of these institutions established in London, Paris, Berlin, and various other
places, he concluded his remarks by stating that he had come to the conclusion that the Liverpool
Gymnasium was the most complete of all - not the largest, certainly, but the most elaborately fitted
up. There were only two persons, he thought, who endeavoured to introduce anything new in athletic
exercise - for the Germans adhered too much to the old system - and these two persons were Mr Hulley
and M. Paz, of a Parisian gymnasium. He (Mr Burnham) taught a number of young ladies himself, and
he was glad to see that those of the opposite sex attended the Liverpool Gymnasium. In conclusion, he
wished them every success, and gave them an example of a dumbbell exercise himself to music.
Subsequently a class went through club exercises under the leadership of Mr H. Pearson. At the close of
the preceding Mr Mcnaught proposed a vote of thanks to Mr Burnham, for his interesting remarks and
expressed his pleasure at finding that Liverpool took the lead in these matters, which he hoped it would
maintain. At the same time, he assured the members of his best wishes and cordial co-operation in their
work.

1868 - LIVERPOOL TRADES DIRECTORY
Hulley John Gymnasiarch, Liverpool Gymnasium Myrtle St

1868 Jun - The Times - advert for FIFTH OLYMPIC FESTIVAL of the ATHLETIC SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN
which will be held on Monday and Tuesday June 25 and 26 1868. For programmes, rules, &c., apply to
John Hulley, Gymnasiarch of Liverpool, Vice-President of the Athletic Society. - Liverpool Gymnasium.

1868 03 Nov - Liverpool Mercury - PHRENOLOGICAL SOCIETY -
Session 1868-9 LECTURE in the Free Library, William Brown-street, by JOHN HULLEY Esq.,
Gymnasiarch. THIS EVENING. Subject “Imperfect Vitality.” J.B. BURROWS, Esq., M.D. President, in the
Chair. Annual Subscription now due.

1868 03 Nov - Liverpool Mercury - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM -
The directors of this institution, in their report, state that the commercial depression, which existed at the
time the last report was issued has continued to prevail, and has seriously militated against the success
of the institution. The accounts to 30th September last showed the total receipts to have been £1184 1s
7d, against £1630 4s 3d in 1867, and the expenditure £1298 2s 9d, against £1410 17s 3d in 1867,
leaving a loss on the year of £114 1s 2d, without putting by the usual reserve for depreciation: had this
been done, the loss would have appeared as £316 15s 9d, With a view to placing the advantages of the
institution within the reach of a larger number of persons, the directors have reduced the terms for
evening membership to one guinea per annum, and they are assured that a large accession of
subscribers may in consequence be expected. It has, however, come obvious to the directors that
unless the gymnasium is appreciated by the public, at any rate to the extent of making it self-support -
ing, it would be absolutely necessary to close it all together; it is to be hoped, however, that this altern-
-ative may be avoided, and that the next season may prove completely successful. The ladies classes
continue to give satisfaction, and, it is believed, productive and much good. The directors acknowledg-
-ed with pleasure Mr Hulley's zeal and welfare of the institution; also the valuable service of Mr. T.W.
Read, secretary. (also in Nov 9th edition)

1868 09 Dec - Liverpool Mercury - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM -
The annual grand athletic fete in connection with this institution took place last night at the Gymnasium,
Myrtle-St. There was large and fashionable attendance, showing that a taste for gymnastic exercises is
growing at only amongst the youth of the town, but also amongst the fairer sex. Mr W. Rathbone, M. P,
presided, and there were also present Messrs G. Melly, M.P., C. P. Melly, C. Langton, P.B. Drinkwater, G.
Holt, W. D. Holt, H. C. Tunnicliff, C. Stoess, the Rev. Nevison Lorraine, the Rev. W. Banister, Dr Colling-
-wood, Major Bousfield, &c.
(List of programme of exercises) the different performances were watched with the closest of interest by
the spectators, and the gymnasts reliably and frequently applauded for the skill, agility, and strength
which they display. During an interval in the programme,
The CHAIRMAN rose and said - When I was asked to take the chair at this evening there seemed at first
something incongruous with my Quaker education in presiding at an assault-at-arms. (Laughter.) But
this incongruity was merely verbal, for the assault to be made by Mr Hulley's regiment is not one for the
purpose of spilling blood, but for the purpose of infusing fresh blood into the human frame -(hear, hear)-
not one for destroying life, but for preserving and invigorating it. (Hear, hear.) I am sorry to find, from
information given me by Mr Drinkwater, that the bad times have told upon this as well as upon other
institutions. But the directors have adopted the wise course of reducing the subscriptions to a guinea,
which I trust may be followed, as other reductions are, by the increased consumption of a commodity is
so necessary to the well-being of society. (Applause.)
While on this subject I am requested to mention that there is in connection with this institution, a club to
which any member may belong by paying an additional 10s. a year, and where he may read the
papers and have tea or coffee in the evening. (Hear, hear.) I will not delay you long from the pleasures
of the evening, but I should not be doing my duty if I did not say a few words on the importance of
gymnastics to society in general, and to Liverpool in particular, where so many spent the greater part of
the time In sedentary occupations. (Hear, hear.)
By the safe use of gymnastics not only is the body strengthened, and the power of enjoying the fruits of
our labour increased, but even the success of a business is promoted by the increased vigour of our
bodily frame, which tends to stimulate enterprise and prevent our judgement being weakened by that
alternate elation and depression which is the natural consequence of ill health. (Hear, hear.) The
gymnastic institutions of Germany have long been famous, but our French neighbours, with that in élan
and impulse for which they are so celebrated, have gone ahead, I believe, of both Germany and
England. In England, indeed, until very lately, gymnastics, as a science, were almost practically
unknown. The best specimen is the Grand Gymnase at Paris, unless our gymnasium here rivals it. I
believe we have here all the same appliances, and our gymnasium is conducted on the same system
as that of Paris, while we have the advantage of a lower subscription. (Hear, hear.) Notwithstanding the discouragement of the past year, I am sanguine as to the future of the establish-
-ment, because we have on our side two great powers in the community. First, the medicine men,
were strongly in favour of gymnastics under the judicious and cautious management of Mr Hulley
(Hear, hear.) I have myself seen most wonderful improvements in health, strength, and beauty effected
by following out his advice. Then a still greater power than the doctors are the ladies, who have
warmly taken up the cause of gymnastics (Applause.) I consider one of the best auguries of the future
success of the gymnasium are the ladies’ class. (Hear, hear.) To their hands, we commit our cause,
and hope they will induce their husbands, brothers, and sons to follow their good example. (Applause.)
The chairman, concluded by thanking the gymnasts for the exertions they had made for the entertain -
-ment of the company, associating with the compliment the name of Mr Pearson.
Mr PEARSON, in reply, said he trusted the gymnasium would prosper for many years to come, and that
it would have many opportunities of meeting their friends there on similar occasions. At the close of the
exercises, Mr C. LANGTON proposed a vote of thanks to Mr Rathbone for presiding, and in doing so,
congratulated him on the distinction he had lately obtained in having been elected as one of the
parliamentary representatives of his native town. (Applause.)
The Chairman briefly acknowledged the compliment, and the proceedings terminated.

1868 09 Dec - Liverpool Daily Post - ATHLETIC FETE AT THE GYMNASIUM -
Mr. Hulley and his band of gymnasts had a féte at their institution in Myrtle-street. The building was con-
-veniently filed by a fashionable audience, and the gay attire of the ladies, combined with the neat and
pretty costumes of the members, imparted a brilliancy to the occasion.
(inc.) Judging, however, from the performances last evening we should say that Mr. Hulley has brought
his pupils to a state of efficiency which cannot be surpassed by any similar institution in the kingdom.
When the programme had been half gone through, Mr. William Rathbone rose, and was received wth
loud and prolonged applause.
He said:- Ladies and Gentlemen, when I was first applied to take the chair this evening, there seemed
to be something incongruous with my Quaker education in presiding at an assault of arms (laughter).
But the incongruity was merely verbal, as the assault to be made by Mr. Hulley’s regiment is not one for
the purpose of spilling blood, but for the purpose of infusing fresh blood into the human frame; not one
for destroying life, but for saving it and invigorating it (applause). I am sorry to find, from information
given me by Mr. Drinkwater, that the bad times have fallen on this institution, as well as others. But the
directors have adopted the wise course of reducing the subscriptions to one guinea, which I hope will
be followed, as other reductions are, by increased consumption of a commodity so necessary as health
to the well-being of society (applause).
(inc.) The medical men are strongly in favour of gymnastics under the judicious and cautious manage-
- ent of Mr. Hulley. I have seen myself most wonderful improvements in health and strength brought
about by his training.

1869 20 Jan - Liverpool Mercury - THE BICYCLE
We have requested by Mr Hulley to state, in answer to numerous enquiries at the gymnasium, that the
members of the Liverpool Velocipede club are in correspondence with several of the principal velo-
cipede makers in Paris, New York, and elsewhere, and that in the course of a week or two they hope to
be able to state full particulars as to where the best machines may be procured on the most reasonable
terms. In the meantime, illustrations as to the management of the bicycle will be given at the gymnas-
-ium, every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday evenings until further notice by Mr John Shepherd,
instructor to the club.

1869 20 Jan - Morning Post - VELOCIPEDES -
On Monday night and also on Saturday evening an exhibition was given at the Liverpool Gymnasium, in
presence of a numerous company, by way of displaying powers of a velocipide which Mr Hulley procur-
-ed from Paris, where such a locomotive machines have found special favour. Recent French improve-
ments have made the velocipede much less clumsy than it used to be in former days. The small saddle
upon which the driver seats himself is placed between a couple of wheels, one in front and the other
behind. It is propelled by means of the traveller, pressing his feet with even action upon a piece of brass
attached on each side of the guiding wheel before him, which wheel is the largest of the two, being
about a yard in diameter. When the operator has thoroughly learned the art of balancing, he can congrat
-ulate himself on having mastered the main difficulty and danger of the contrivance. Anyone who has
sufficiently practised with the machine can, we believe, be carried forward by it at the rate of about 25
miles an hour. Even while gliding along at its greatest speed this novel iron-horse can be very easily
regulated and made to turn on either side. The performer at the exhibition to which we more immediate-
ly refer was Mr J. Shepherd, who seemed to have perfect control of the unique conveyance. A. "Veloci-
-pide Club" has been organised in connection with the Liverpool Gymnasium.

1869 08 Apr - Liverpool Daily Post THE ALEXANDRA THEATRE
Last evening Mr Halliday’s “King o’ Scots” was supplemented by a new and original farce, written by Mr.
Andrew Halliday “expressly for Mr. Edward Saker,” as the programme informs us. Last night’s farce was
called “The Teetotal Family,” and its humours turned upon the teetotal propensities of a family residing in
the country, to whom one Charley Chandon (Mr. E. Saker), a London exquisite of the Champagne
Charlie order, has travelled on a bicycle to see his intended, the daughter of the family. Mr. Saker’s first
appearance on the bicycle was not so successful as it might have been; but the idea, and the allusions
arising out of it to Mr. John Hulley, the gymnasiarch, were greatly relished.

1869 10 Apr - Cheshire Observer and Chester, Birkenhead , Crewe and North Wales Times
THE GREAT BICYCLE RACE FROM CHESTER TO ROCK FERRY.
Mr Eaton, winner, is a member both of the Liverpool Bicycle Club and of the Gymnasium; and on Satur-
-day evening, after the classes at the latter institution had gone through their exercises under the
direction of Mr Hulley, in the presence of a large number of spectators, Mr Eaton entered the hall upon
the machine with which he had proved victorious. He was greeted with hearty applause, which was
several times repeated as he gave proof of the perfect skill which he possessed in the management of
the bicycle. The majority of the bicycles used were manufactured by Mr Brown, a gentleman who offered
the prize, and from what we can gather did their work very satisfactorily.

1869 17 Apr - Liverpool Daily Post - BICYCLE TOURNAMENT -
If Liverpool remains long without a sensation it is not the fault of Mr. Hulley. He has done his best for
several years to give us something to talk about, and write about, and has on occasions created no small
amount of talking and writing. His latest achievement is the introduction of the two-wheeled velocipede-
or, as its devotees call it, the bicycle. We are inclined to think their phraseology is incorrect, and if the
word is permissible at all it should be biscycle or two circles, not bicycle or half a circle. While on the
matter of verbal criticism, we may mention that Mr. Hulley has provided us with a small sensation
concerning the pronunciation of his cognomen, the Gymnasiarch. The partisans of the g hard a nd g soft
in the pronunciation of this jaw-breaking word are almost as ardent in their controversies as the Guelphs
and the Ghibellines, the Oraini and the Colanna, the Montagues and the Capulets.
Mr. Hulley’s last sensation, which has been devised in conjunction with the President of the Velocipede
Club, Mr. P. B. Drinkwater, and its secretary Mr. J. M. Caw, who, with Mr. Pearson, made that velocipede
journey from Liverpool to London quite a novel spectacle. It is called in the advertisements a velocipede
tournament, and is to come off on Saturday next at the Gymnasium. Our limited knowledge of the
bicycle, confined principally to a causal view of young gentlemen bowling along level roads, on a perch
of apparent insecurity, would incline us to believe that if the same persons engage in any business of a
tilting sort a considerable amount of crash, represented by contusions, dislocations, and the breaking of
small bones, must be the result. However, we suppose the ardent velocipedians, who will participate in
the pleasure of tilting at one another, have counted these chances, and reckoned on the propinquity of
a setter of bones and a compounder of embrocations. As appendages to the actual business of the
tournament, will be tilting at the ring, throwing the javelin, and sundry exercises of this sort, which we
have read about in “Ivanhoe,” Pierre Egan’s novels, and the account of English sports and pastimes
compiled by the learned Mr. Strutt.
We do not notice that the sport of the quintain# is included. It is usually practise in the water pastimes,
but quintain á la velocipede would be original as the title for the programme of sport as it would be
amusing in practice. As a pendant to the labours of the velocipedians there will be an assault-at-arms
on foot, comprising fencing, broad--sword, sabre versus bayonet, &c., by the members of the Liverpool
Fencing Club, under the direction of Mr. Anderson, the master of arms. Altogether, we should say that
the soul of the Gymnasiarch will be rejoiced by a full Gymnasium, and that his visitors will be gladdened
by heaps of sport. # a post for tilting at.

1869 19 Apr - Liverpool Mercury - A NOVEL FORM OF TOURNAMENT
Professor Faraday, steaming up Hampstead-hill on a four-wheeled velocipede is now a familiar figure of
history. Not to speak it disrespectfully, Faraday knew much more than a thing or two; but neither the
circle of his knowledge than that of his speculation comprised the two-wheeled velocipede, now called
the bicycle. Paris has been bicycle mad some time; London is getting into that condition of enthusiasm,
which is not far from bicycle madness; and Liverpool is now heavily bitten with the bicycle mania. A
machine that will enable a man to travel eight miles an hour instead of the regulation four, which can be
got out of the animal known as "Shanks' pony," or the vehicle called familiarly the "marrowbone stage,"
is certainly regarded in the light of a boon.
For some time past, Mr Hulley has, with the assistance of professors competent in the bicycle exercise,
and aided and abetted by a certain velocipede club (Mr P. B. Drinkwater president, and Mr J. M. Caw
secretary), been ministering his best to satisfy what is not correctly called a mania. The gymnasium
affords splendid opportunities for the exercise in the inanimate horse named the bicycle, and according
-ly the gymnasium is to be the arena next Saturday, for a velocipede tournament, in the course of which
gentlemen mounted on bicycles will tilt at other gentlemen on bicycles, with long lances, from which
must result in a considerable quantity of tumbling about of a laughable character. Tilting at the rink,
throwing the javelin, and sundry matters of the same kind will be included in the programme. After the
wind and limbs of the bicycle men are exhausted, the attention of the spectators will be engaged by the
members at the Liverpool Fencing Club, under the direction of Mr Anderson, a master of arms. Their
programme will comprise an assault-at-arms on foot, including fencing, broadsword exercise, sabre
versus bayonet Cavalry sword practice. No doubt the occasion will be remembered as one of the most
interesting in the annals of the gymnasium.

1869 24 Apr - Liverpool Mercury - THE BICYCLE TOURNAMENT TODAY -
The much-talked-of golf tournament on bicycles will take place at the Gymnasium this afternoon, at
three o'clock, and will be repeated in the evening. The latter announcement has been necessitated by
the extraordinary demand for places at the afternoon tournament. It was found utterly impossible to
accommodate the whole of the people who applied for tickets; and the committee of the club, anxious to
meet this popular demand, resolved, at a special meeting held yesterday, that the proceedings of the
afternoon should as far as possible be repeated in the evening.
For this the public are much indebted to the President (Mr. Drinkwater) and the secretary (Mr Caw.) The
programme includes tilting at the ring on bicycles, throwing the javelin on bicycles, fencing, evolutions
on bicycles, tilting on bicycles, boxing, broadsword attack on bicycles, fancy riding on bicycles, &c. The
whole of the proceedings, afternoon and evening, will be under the superintendence of Mr Anderson,
the master-at-arms. We believe the idea of this tournament, quite original in its way, belongs to the
gymnasiarch Mr. Hulley.

1869 15 Jul - Bradford Observer - THE GYMNASIARCH AND THE “CRUEL PARIENT.” On Tuesday, a large and
fashionable company were assembled in one of the Unitarian Chapels at Liverpool, to witness the
marriage of Mr. Hully, director of the Liverpool gymnasium (and well known as the gymnasiarch), with
Miss Bolton, the daughter of a local wealthy merchant. the bridegroom and all present were, however,
sadly disappointed. No bride appeared, and it transpired that the “cruel parient,” objecting to the match,
had prevented her leaving the house by the old plan of locking her up in her room.

1869 16 Jul - Liverpool Mercury - GYMNASIARCH AND THE MERCHANT’S DAUGHTER SUDDEN PREVENTION OF
A MARRIAGE
We have heard a strange story of the interruption of a wedding, which had been arranged to come off
yesterday between a well-known illustrator of the doctrine of “men's sana corporo sano”, and the only
daughter of one of our wealthiest merchant princes. The affair has caused quite an acusation, and the
names of the parties have been freely mentioned.
There are various versions of the strange affair current. Several of these stories are mere idle gossip; but
that a marriage was intended, and from some cause suddenly prevented between the parties alluded to
is beyond all question. It seems that a well-known Gymnasiarch has been for some time paying his
court to Miss B----, only daughter of a gentleman residing in Aigburth-road. The lady’s family is wealthy
and well-connected, her uncle having been mayor of Liverpool; and her father regarded as one of the
most successful and opulent of merchants. From some cause Miss B----‘s relatives were not in favour of
the Gymnasiarch’s suit; in fact, her father and mother, it is stated, have been decidedly adverse to it. It
would be very ungallant to attempt to indicate too closely, the lady’s age. Suffice to say she is not a
minor, and has reached those years of discretion when as “Mrs Candour” says, a lady in a love affair is
certainly able to “take care of herself.” But, rightly or wrongly, some of her friends thought otherwise, and
seemed to have thrown impediments in the way of the match.
The lady seems, however, to have preferred her lover to her friends’ counsel, and is said to have ex-
-pressed a firm determination to marry him with or without their consent. She was not, too, without
some female friends to take her part. They observed that she was quite decided as to the course she
should adopt, and, thinking that opposition was useless - if they ever decide to oppose - they espoused
her cause, and gave her that sympathy, which females under such interesting circumstances are so
generally glad to afford to each other.
The wedding of the Gymnasiarch and the lady was fixed to take place yesterday at the Ancient Chapel
(Unitarian), Toxteth-park. A special license had been duly obtained, but by whom has not transpired.
The Rev. Charles Wicksteed, one of the ministers of Hope-street Unitarian Chapel, was requested to
perform the marriage ceremony; and we believe the reverend gentleman, with his usual courtesy,
obligingly came from Wales, where he was staying, to Liverpool, to make the Gymnasiarch and the
lady “one”, but the Fates - although the circumstances of uniting the discipline of Hercules with the
merchant's daughter, must have been inviting - were cruelly adverse. The gods were against the
Gymnasiarch, and they decreed that, potent as he is, his wedding should not take place at least yester-
day.
The secret of the projected wedding seems, like all such “Ladies Secrets”, to have oozed out. The
lady’s father appears to have got wind of the affair, and made up his mind to prevent it. What steps
were taken to prevent the lady from communicating with her knight is not known, but there is something
spoken of which leads one's thoughts back to those days of romance when gentlemen made such
doughty efforts to release ladies from the thraldom of stern fathers who interfered with their daughters
love-making and marriage. Mr B---- is reported to have thought the best plan of defeating the matri-
monial designs of his daughter and the Gymnasiarch was to shut up the former in his residence. The
lady is said to have been forbidden to leave her father's residence. But when was lover prevented from
communicating with forlorn damsel thus immured? “Stone walls do not a prison make," especially
when the person confined is in love; and the Gymnasiarch could surely hold converse, with his betroth-
-ed? At all events it is said by neighbours and gossips - for even in Toxteth-park, puritanical as may be
its reputation, there is a “School for Scandal” - that the lady, despairing of leaving her mansion with the
pomp and ceremony of said that on Monday night two faithful friends of her lover were waiting near her
father’s mansion, and that a bundle containing some portion of the lady’s wardrobe was thrown out to
them from one of the windows; that she intended to follow as soon as possible; but that her father, who
was up, seeing what had occurred, and having his suspicions aroused, determined to prevent her
leaving the house, which he succeeded in doing.
The next scene in this singular drama is - to use stage parlance - removed to the Ancient Chapel of the
Dingle. At 11 o'clock, the chapel was opened, and it was soon filled, chiefly by gaily dressed ladies; for
the news of the expected wedding and its attendant circumstances had penetrated the bowloirs is of
the fashionable neighbourhoods of Princes Park, Aigburth, and Garston, and the ladies were naturally
anxious to witness the interesting event. The bridegroom, accompanied by a well-known local brewer,
as his “best man”, and a few friends, was seen about 11 o'clock, approaching the chapel on foot. The
“happy man”, and his friends were dressed in suitable costume, and there was quite a flutter of excite-
ment as the parties smilingly entered the chapel. Mutual congratulations were exchanged, and a short
time was pleasantly spent in looking upon the interesting building and its fair occupants. But, agree-
able, as even this may sometimes be found, it gets tiresome, if protracted, at a wedding ceremony.
The church, if it was not “decked at a morning tide” and if the tapers did not “glimmer fair”, as they are
sometimes said to have done on a like romantic occasion, yet presented a beautiful appearance,
filled, as it was, by a bevy of fair ladies on tiptoe of expectation, to witness the approach of the blush-
ing bride.
But she came not. She, however, might be detained a little arranging her bridal wreath, or by some
trifling affair of that kind, and would no doubt soon arrive. These and other anticipation were indulged
in; but, as the time wore on and as she did not come, strange misgivings began to enter the minds of
the spectators, and the smiles of the bridegroom's party gave way to looks of despondency, and at
length to blank despair. After waiting about an hour the people began to leave the chapel, evidently
feeling that the ceremony would not come off that day. About 12 o'clock there was nobody left but the
minister, his assistant, the Gymnasiarch, and his friends. At length the officials, being tired of waiting,
closed the shutters of the chapel; and the bridegroom and party, evidently, despairing of the lady
coming, left the chapel, not looking quite so spruce and gay as when they entered, but (as a spectator
expressed it), as cheerful as could be expected under the circumstances.
The absence of the lady from the chapel is accounted for in this way: - It is said that when the hour at
which the ceremony was to have taken place approached her father went to her apartments and locked
the bride-elect up in her room, and peremptorily refused to allow her to leave his house to get married.
Whether the lady continues imprisoned is not known; but it is said that if she persists in the match, her
parents threatened to “cut her off with a shilling”. The approaches to the house, too, are guarded, it is
said, by stalwart servants, and if the Gymnasiarch approaches the abode of his lady love he may be
roughly handled. But he despairs not, at least if his conduct yesterday afternoon be any indication of
his feeling. He was seen repeatedly in the neighbourhood of Park-road, wandering listlessly, but with
a hopeful look, near the mansion where his bride was probably pent up and pining. He may be yet
hopeful. There have been worst disappointments than his. The lady may yet be free to wed the man
of her choice, and then, no doubt, the Ancient Chapel of the Dingle would be crowded by the beauty
and fashion of the district, and the Gymnasiarch would leave it with his bride a happier man than he
appeared yesterday morning.

1869 16 Jul - Leeds Mercury - The Gymnasiarch and the "Cruel Parent" -
On Tuesday, a large and ashionable company were assembled in one of the Unitarian chapels at Liver-
-pool, to witness the marriage of Mr Hulley, director of the Liverpool Gymnasium (and well known as the
Gymnasiarch), with Miss Bolton, the daughter of a wealthy local merchant. The bridegroom and all pres-
-ent were, however, sadly disappointed. No bride appeared, and it transpired that the "cruel parent," object
ing to the match, had prevented her leaving the house by the old plan of locking her up in her room.

1869 16 Jul - married at the Ancient Unitarian Chapel Toxteth Park Liverpool: John Hulley 37 years Bachelor Gymnas-
-iarch Myrtle Street Liverpool - father John Hulley (deceased) Surgeon; Georgina Bolton 29 years Spinster
Laurel Mount Aigburth - father Robert Lewin Bolton Merchant. Wits: Robert Trimble, Caroline Avison.

1869 17 Jul - Liverpool Mercury Marriages -
Hulley -- Bolton July 16, at the Ancient Chapel (Unitarian), Toxteth-park, by the Rev Charles Wickstead,
B..A., Mr John Hulley to Georgiana Bolton.

1869 17 Jul - Liverpool Mercury - Marriage of the Gymnasiarch -
The aristocratic and usually quiet locality of the Dingle was in a state of unusual excitement yesterday
morning. It was rumoured that, notwithstanding the opposition he had encountered in his suit, Mr John
Hulley, the Gymnasiarch, was to lead to the hymenial altar Miss Georgiana Bolton, the only daughter of
Mr Robert Lewin Bolton, merchant, Laurel-Mount, Aigburth-road, and granddaughter of the late Mr
Thomas Bolton, who was, in 1840, Mayor of Liverpool. About half-past ten there were little signs to indic-
ate that so interesting an event was likely to come off. About a quarter to 11, however, the doors of the
Ancient Chapel (Unitarian) in the Dingle were thrown open, and soon afterwards the Rev. C. Wicksteed,
accompanied by the chapel keeper, Mr Forrester, and Mr Chambers, the registrar of marriages for the
district, arrived. The news that the wedding was to take place seems to have been widely circulated,
although it was said that there was a desire to keep the affair as secret as possible, for in a short time the
Chapel was filled by a fashionable audience, chiefly composed of ladies. A few minutes before 11 o'clock
the bride (Miss Bolton) entered the Chapel, leaning on the arm of Mr C. E. Rawlins, and was accompan-
-ied by Lieutenant-Colonel Trimble, Miss Avison, and other ladies and gentlemen. Soon afterwards, Mr
Hulley arrived alone.
After a brief delay, the bridal party took up their positions in front of the communion rails, and the marr-
-iage ceremony was performed by the Rev. C. Wicksteed, the bride and bridegroom giving the responses
in a firm and clear voice. After the marriage, and when the happy couple were at the communion table,
the reverend gentleman - as is customary on such occasions - addressed a few suitable words of admon-
-ition to them. Addressing the bridegroom, he said the lady whom he had taken for his wife had separat-
ed herself from her family, and have perhaps made some sacrifice of position; but he hoped that in their
wedded life he would never give cause to regret the step she had taken. The bride and bridegroom next
signed the certificate of marriage, Lieutenant-Colonel Trimble being the witness. The bridal party then left
the Chapel; and as they drove off, were cheered by a large crowd that had assembled outside, the bride-
-groom lifting his hat in acknowledgement of the salutation. It is understood that the happy couple will
spend their honeymoon in Paris.
Detective-Inspector Carlisle, Detective Scaife, and a few officers were present to preserve order, but their
services were not required.

1869 19 Jul - Glasgow Herald - MARRIAGE UNDER DIFFICULTIES. (From the Liverpool Courier).
Some a few days ago it was whispered, so loudly as to reach the ears of the greater portion of the
scandal-loving section of the population of Liverpool, that an intention of marriage in the fashionable and
ancient Unitarian Chapel, Toxteth Park, had been frustrated by the intervention of the ladies indignant
and dissent papa. Supplementing this whispered rumour said that the bride elect was the fair and
accomplished daughter of one of Liverpool's wealthiest and most honoured merchants, and the “Alonso"
of her affections the well-known Gymnasiarch. The unromantic but needful provision of obtaining a
special license was accordingly attended to, and the Rev. Charles Wicksteed, of Asaph, North Wales,
consented to perform the ceremony, which was fixed for Tuesday. The lady was prepared, and more
than willing, to accompany the gentleman to the hymeneal altar, and the Gymnasiarch had in waiting,
under the umbrageous shades of the stern papa’s “ancestral oaks”, a carriage and pair, but, alas! while
John stood flicking the flies from the glossy coats of the gallant greys, a change came across the spirit of
the lovers’ dream.
The father by some means had learnt of the design afoot, and at once put in force parental authority to
prevent its being carried out to its full fruition. The means taken for this purpose were of the most effect-
-ual character. The lady was detained in her chamber, and to all her entreaties “the father was flint and
the mother was stone”. The chapel filled with people expectant of the pleasure of witnessing the interest-
-ing event; the bridegroom was present, receiving the congratulations of his friends; but time past and no
bride came. Waiting was protracted until its uselessness came apparent, and eventually it was known
that on that day at least, no marriage could take place. The crowd the dispersed, the chapel was closed,
and bridegroom was left lamenting but not despairing.
The lady does not appear to have been kept in durance vile for any protracted period, as on the same
day she left her father's residence and went to stay with Mr and Mrs Avison, friends who are opposed to
the projected marriage, sympathised with the young lady in circumstances which, in so cruel a manner,
tested her affections.
On Friday morning it became known that the marriage would undoubtedly take place, the lady proving
faithful to her plighted faith and obdurate to the entreaty of relatives and the advice of friends, having at
least been left to pursue her own untrammelled inclination. Shortly after 10 o'clock, therefore, an expect-
-ant crowd assembled within and around the Ancient Chapel, and just before 11 o'clock their curiosity
was rewarded by the appearance of bridegroom and bride. The lady came in a cab, accompanied by
the friends whose names we have mentioned, while the bridegroom came upon foot and unattended.
The lady was plainly attired, the marriage trappings of wealth in which she might have been arrayed had
the marriage occurred under other auspices being wanting. The bridegroom looked nervous and ill at
ease, perhaps fearful of an interruption of the ceremony; but of this the result proved that he need have
no dread. The service was rendered more than usually impressive by the evident feeling shown by the
rev. officiant that he was celebrating marriage under circumstances different from the ordinary current of
events, and the major portion of the assembly appeared to sympathise with and participate in the feel-
-ing. It is understood that the newly married pair left Liverpool in the afternoon for London en route for
France and Switzerland, where they will spend the honeymoon.

1869 14 Aug - Penny Illustrated Paper - article on Physical Education, Including a critique of a paper written by Mr,
Ernest G. Ravenstein, President of the German Gymnastic Society.
The youth of London has already been much benefited by the system so ably and recommended by Mr
Ravenstein. He and a few brother gymnasts have in a comparatively short time trained, in town, a band
of athletes whose prowess is well known from their fetes at the Crystal Palace on their success at
provincial Olympian meetings. The excellent gymnasium, which they have established in Stainton-
terrace, King’s-Cross, has been depicted by us more than once; and our readers may be reminded of
the London Turnverein, by the Illustration of
THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM
which we print on another page. This popular institution owes its existence mainly to the energy of Mr
Melly, who raised the sum necessary for its construction. Mr Hulley is the "gymnasiarch. The animated
scene presented by the large hall at night may be observable in every movement, here, there, and
everywhere, and all performing some feat of grace or strength. And one, with a little of the seaman in
his blood, runs up the rigging with an agility that many an old tar might envy. Here a brawny youth is
wielding gracefully, a pair of heavy clumps; and here, again, a little knot of competitors are trying to out
do each other with seemingly impossible feats on the bar. In the centre a class, under the direction of
Mr Hulley, are ventilating their lungs a little by a series of graceful movements, which in unison have a
very pretty effect. Everywhere there is activity, and sooner or later, as the case may be, everyone
engaged in feeling the benefit.


1869 30 Sep - Liverpool Daily Post - AN AMERICAN GYMNASIUM. -
A New York paper, in drawing attention to a magnificent gymnasium just opened there under the dir-
-ection of Mr. Avon C. Burnham, says, :- This academy of physical culture has been erected with a view
of making it one of the most complete and perfect institutions of its kind in the world. With this view, Mr
Burnham visited Europe , in order to observe the working of all the various schools devoted to the
advancement of physical culture in the Old World. He visited all the gymnasia in Liverpool, London,
Paris, Bremen, Hanover, Berlin, Dresden, Leipsic, Stuttgardt, and also many others of lesser note that
are scattered throughout the country. His new hall (in New York) is 140 by 75 feet, and the finest
appointed for gymnastic purpose in the world. There is nothing that can approach it in beauty and
completeness with the one single exception of the ‘Liverpool Gymnasium,’ in England. Mr John Hulley,
gymnasiarch, to whom Mr. Burnham feels deeply indebted for favours received whilst in Europe.

1869 29 Nov - Liverpool Daily Post - THE ATHLETIC FESTIVAL TO-NIGHT.
The fifth annual Athletic Festival of the Liverpool Gymnasium will be held to-night, and unabated interest
seems to be taken in the occasion.. Lord Sandon, M.P., is to preside, and his well-known sincerity and
earnestness, not less than his invariable address as a speaker, ender his presidency very attractive.
The programme of the festival , which will, as usual, be a complete demonstration of physical culture, is
arranged as usual by Mr. Hulley, who has always been the life and soul of the institution, and than
whom no gymnasiarch in Europe is either more competent or more enthusiastic. The assembly will be
entirely en fete, evening dress being the rule; and nothing will be wanting to make the gymnasium, as
on former occasions, a scene of great gaiety and pleasurable excitement.

1870 08 Jan - Liverpool Mercury - SOIREE CALISTHENIQUE AT THE GYMNASIUM
Report on the above event including:
Dr. Manifold concluded by proposing a vote of thanks to the young ladies, who had gone through the
exercises that evening, and also to Mr Hulley, the gymnasiarch, and to Mrs Batt, who superintended the
ladies’ classes and had decorated the building. Mr. HULLEY briefly replied, as did also Mrs. Batt.

1870 29 Sep - Liverpool Courier and Commercial Advertiser - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM - MR HULLEY'S
FAREWELL ADDRESS.
Mr. Hulley, whose name has been long connected with physical education in this town, and mainly
through whose efforts the gymnasium in Myrtle-street has been erected, is about to sever his connection
with that institution, so far as regards the management of it, in conseqence of ill-health. this being his last
week at the institution, he gave a farewell address, last evening, to the members and their friends, who
had assembled in large numbers.
(more to be transcribed)

1870 Dec qtr - dau Georgina Theodosia born at Liverpool RD: Hulley Georgiana Theodosis Liverpool 8b 158 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3783 f6 Liverpool 91 Grove Street
John Hulley Head M 38 Gymnasiarch Professor Liverpool
Georgiana Hulley Wife M 31 Liverpool
Elizabeth Hulley Mther W 73 Flintshire Overton
Georgina Hulley Dau 6mos Liverpool
Margaret Hughes Servt U 26 Domestic Liverpool
Ann Hughes Servt U 20 Domestic Liverpool

1871 02 Oct - Liverpool Mercury - The Liverpool Gymnasium Inaugural Address -
on Saturday night, Mr Philip Shrapnell, lessee of the Gymnasium in Myrtle-street, delivered his inaugural
address to a large number of the members of the Gymnasium, and visitors, who thronged the galleries.
Mr Shrapnell, it will be remembered, entered into possession of the Gymnasium some 12 months ago,
not acting as his predecessor had done, as manager of a company, but becoming proprietor himself.
(Incl.) I need not assure you that I have no desire to depreciate what has been already done, and done
well, by my esteemed friend and predecessor, Mr Hulley, when I say that this institution, large as it is and
great as its resources are, is far below the point of what ought to be required in such a place at Liverpool.

1873 - LIVERPOOL TRADES DIRECTORY
Hulley John 91 Grove Street (Liverpool Gymnasium Myrtle St - Philip Shrapnall lessee)

1873 17 Feb - Liverpool Mercury - THE LIVERPOOL GYMNASIUM. LADIES SOIREE.
At a fete of considerable novelty and interest was held at this establishment last Friday evening at
which, had been notwithstanding the restrictions as to admission as far as gentlemen were concerned,
there was a crowded and brilliant assemblage of ladies. The occasion of this gathering was a "soiree
calisthenique," as it was described on the programme, in which the lady members of the gymnasium
were the performers; and the admissions, which were by invitation, which were strictly confined to the
lady friends of the pupils and gentlemen who were of the medical profession.
(Including) Dr. J. BIRKBECK NEVINS, who presided, addressed the assembly. He expressed the
pleasure he felt at witnessing a charming exercises they had just seen, and this pleasure had been
increased, if that was possible, by seeing that the exertions formally made by Mr Hulley, whom he was
glad to see present, and which met with so much success, had been so admirably kept up by his
successor, Mr Shrapnell.

1875 06 Jan - died at 91 Grove Street Liverpool: John Hulley Male 42 years Gentleman - cause of death Emphysema
of Lungs Bronchitis Certified by A. Waters M.D. Informant - E. Hulley Mother In attendance Grove Street.

1875 07 Jan - Liverpool Daily Post Thursday, January 7, 1875. Page 6 column 1- DEATHS -
(incl.) HULLEY - January 6, at 91, Grove-street, aged 42 years, John Hulley, Esq

1875 07 Jan - Liverpool Mercury Thursday January 7 1875 Page 7 column 6 DEATHS -
(incl.) Hully - Jan 6 at 91 Grove-street, aged 42. John Hully, Esq.

1875 08 Jan - Liverpool Mercury Friday January 8 1875 Page 6 column 6. THE LATE GYMNASIARCH -
Our obituary of yesterday contained an announcement of the decease of Mr. John Hulley, of this town,
at the comparatively early age of 42 years. Mr. Hulley was well known in Liverpool as a most enthus-
-iastic teacher of gymnastic exercises, and by his advocacy of the importance and value of physical
training, he was mainly instrumental in the forming of the Gymnasium Company of Liverpool, and in the
subsequent erection of the fine building now standing in Myrtle-street for gymnastic purposes.
Some years ago, Mr. Hulley opened the Rotunda in Bold-street as a gymnasium, and fitted the room
with the modern appliances; but his stay there was of short duration. In 1864, the present gymnasium
was erected, and Mr. Hulley assumed its management, which he carried on with success until Septem-
- ber, 1870, when he retired in favour of Mr. Shrapnell, the present conductor. On the 4th July, 1869, he
was married to Miss Bolton, daughter of a retired merchant living in Aigburth-vale, and that lady sur-
vives him. So enthusiastic an advocate for this special kind of physical training did Mr. Hulley become
that he was called "The Gymnasiarch" - a title he enjoyed with no small amount of self-complacence.
For sometime previous to his death, Mr. Hulley suffered from a pulmonary infection, which necessitated
his removal from England to a warmer climate during the severity of the winter; but this year, feeling
himself somewhat better, he remained in Liverpool, and unfortunately encountered the recent very
severe weather, which proved fatal to his delicate constitution.

1875 09 Jan - The Porcupine p649 - John Hulley - an appreciation.
LATTERLY, John Hulley, the "Gymnasiarch," as he loved to be called, had not been seen moving about
as of old. Disease, in the shape of a remorseless and wearing chest complaint, had fastened upon his
once athletic frame, and, omitting this year to winter in Algiers, he succumbed to the severity of the recent
frost, and died at the comparatively early age of forty-two. Mr. Hulley had his whimsicalities, which some-
-times offended and worried other people, but, looking at him now, as we have only the right to do, as a
public man, it must be acknowledged that his enthusiasm and imdomitable energy gave a stimulus to
physical education in Liverpool which no other man was both willing and competent to impart.

1875 09 Jan - Prescot Reporter and St Helen’s General Advertiser - DEATH OF MR. JOHN HULLEY.
This gentleman, who was about as well known in Prescot and neighbourhood as he was in Liverpool,
died on Wednesday, at his residence, 91, Grove Street, Liverpool.
He had been well known for many years as a warm supporter of gymnastic training. He was the origin-
ator and chief promoter of the Liverpool Myrtle-street Gymnasium, and from its initiation up to the period
of his decease he took an active interest in the institution. Some time before 1865 he was connected
with the Rotunda Gymnasium in Bold-street, which had a short but brilliant career, in fact he never
ceased to lend his aid on behalf of any movement having for its objective the cultivation of physical
science. During his connection with the Myrtle-street institution he was commonly known as “The
Gymnasiarch .” For some years past Mr. Hulley had been suffering from ill health, and he died at the
early age of 42.

1875 12 Jan - Liverpool Mercury Tuesday January 12 1875 Page 6 col 5. FUNERAL OF THE LATE MR. JOHN HULLEY
The funeral of the late Mr. John Hulley, the "gymnasiarch," took place yesterday morning at the Smith-
down -lane cemetery, the body being conveyed in a hearse drawn by four horses, and followed by two
mourning coaches and the private carriage of Mr. Aaron Brown. Amongst those present at the grave
were Colonel Faulkner, Mr. Councillor Thomas Avison, Mr. Aaron Brown, Mr. Miller, Mr. Shrapnell,
manager of the Gymnasium in Myrtle-street, &c. The officiating minister was the Rev. Hugh Stowell
Brown, Baptist minister, who, in the course of some remarks which he delivered in the chapel, referred to
the fact that Mr. Hulley for several years had escaped death by going to reside during the winter in warm- -er climates than ours, but the late severe weather had proved fatal to him as it had to many more.
In a measure they were indebted to Mr. Hulley for the interest that had been taken in athletic exercises,
and for the establishment of the institution in Myrtle-street, of which he was the first manager. He (Mr.
Brown) believed that the institute had been productive of very great benefit to the young people of the
town, for not only did those exercises benefit the pupils in bodily health, but they led to the cultivation of
manly habits, of temperance, and of self-denial, and so acted upon the moral character as well as the
physical frame. St. Paul had made excellent use of the exercises of the gymnasium as illustrative of the
spiritual efforts that must distinguish the Christian life. (Mr. Hugh Stowell Brown was minister of Myrtle
Street Chapel)

1875 12 Jan - buried at Smithdown Lane Cemetery - in grave number 493, General Section G.
Monumental Inscription (damaged)
Mens Sana in Corpore Sano
In Grateful Remembrance of
JOHN HULLEY
Born 19th Febraury 1832
Died 6th January 1875

1875 23 Jan - Leicester Chronicle and Leicestershire Mercury - THE LATE MR. HULLEY, LIVERPOOL.
In a notice of friendly appreciation of this gentleman, the Editor of the Liverpool Daily Post says: -- "When
he was at the height of his local celebrity many a greater man would have been less missed than John
Hulley. Of late years he has been struggling, cheerfully enough, but under a plainly written sentence of
constitutional doom, with the pulmonary or bronchial disorder to which, no doubt, he has now succumb-
-ed. For several winters Mr Hulley found a retreat to Algeria of signal benefit to him. This year, he seems
to have endeavoured to dispense with a resort to a warmer climate, and it has happened that exception-
-ally severe weather has been experienced in England. It was duly noticed in the public papers that he
was present at the recent assault-at-arms at the Gymnasium in Myrtle-street which owed its existence to
his enthusiasm and public spirit; but he expired, worn out with stoically borne infirmities, at the age of
forty-two.
Although Mr. Hulley has thus died young, and although it is some years since he was a public character,
few men ever managed to crowd into a comparatively unimportant career more various experiences.
Fond of adventure from his youth, he delighted in travel, and had all the happy instincts of a traveller. For
home life, especially for home life in his native town, his style and tone in his youth were a little too
marked, but abroad he exhibited an adaptability which procured him the entrée to good European
society on the one hand, while on the other it made him welcome as a companion amongst American
backwoodsmen and every variety of hardy adventurers.
The Liverpool Gymnasium in Myrtle-street is one of the finest institutions of the kind in this world and it
was raised by a community which certainly is not exceptionally ready to erect buildings for educational
objects. A number of public-spirited men caught the contagion of Mr. Hulley’s zeal, and established,
under his management, an institution which, although the first enthusiasm of its foundation has passed
away,
We will never be permitted to fall into adversity. Hundreds and even thousands of the young men of this
town have found in it, from year to year, that innocent recreation and that impartial exercise which Mr.
Hulley was never tired of contending for as essential to the summum bonum of human felicity. Mr. Hulley
enjoyed the sincere and avowed respect of many who were least likely to sympathize with mere singul-
-arity, and will be lamented by them as one who discovered beneath an unlikely exterior and an uncom-
-promising individuality qualities such as deserve honour wherever they are found.”

1880 01 Nov - Morning Post - The Liverpool Gymnasium Company (Limited) is to be wound up voluntarily.

1881 12 Feb - Leeds Mercury - The Liverpool Gymnasium.
This building, with its appliances, was put up for sale by auction on Thursday by Messrs Branch and
Leets. It was built in 1864, under the superintendence of Mr J. Hulley, but has latterly been carried on
at a loss. The building is held on Corporation lease of 75 years, and it total cost, exclusive of the land,
was £10,400. It covers a large area, and the frontage could be utilised for shops, the rest of the building
being available for a theatre or lecture-hall. The first bid was one of £5,000, the second of £6,000, and
the third £6,100, after which the bidding stopped. The property was then withdrawn.

1881 10 Sep - Wrexham Advertiser -
The shareholders of the Liverpool Gymnasium Company have accepted the offer of Mr.Samuel Smith
on behalf of the trustees of the Young Men's Christian Association, to purcahse the building for the
young men of the city.

1885 25 Feb - Liverpool Mercury - Sports & Pastimes Exhibition in Liverpool -
at the Liverpool Gymnasium, Myrtle-Street. The south gallery was chiefly occupied with prizes won
by Liverpool athletes; in this gallery there was as also a fine bust of the late Mr John Hulley, founder of
the gymnasium, in addition to a number of objects of interest, known as the "Hulley" collection.

1888 25 Feb - The Liverpool Citizen page 7 - SOME OLD LIVERPUDLIANS [by One of Them]
No. 11 - JOHN HULLEY, GYMNASIARCH
YES, it is perfectly true that Liverpool, once upon a time, possessed a real live gymnasiarch, and it is
equally true that John Hulley was the man. It is a terrible sounding title, with a barbaric smack and just a
soupćon of classical Greek; but it certainly existed in the very remarkable person I have named. So far
as I am aware, John Hulley must have invested himself with the very formidable title; but I think that it
might be asserted, with fear of contradiction, that he was the only gymnasiarch who ever lived and
reigned in this country.
In the year 1844, a lythe and agile French émigré, named Louis Huguenin settles in Liverpool as a
teacher of Gymnastics. To the outside and wondering public he was known as Monsieur, but to his
friends and pupils he was only recognisable as Professor Huguenin. Previous to coming to Liverpool, he
had been following his profession in many other places, and at various periods he had "practised" in
Bristol, Dublin, London, and other towns. In or about 1844, as I have said, the Professor became a
naturalised Liverpudlian, and he stayed with us about twenty-five years, as a much appreciated teacher
of gymnastics and a greatly esteemed fellow-townsman.
During many years Mons. Huguenin's school was held up a court* at the top of Lord-street. with an entr-
ance from Cook-street. The teacher's graceful and athletic figure at that time practically illustrated the
advantages of his art, and it must be admitted that he proved himself a benefactor to the gilded youths of
Liverpool. Many of the existing grave and reverent seigniors of the city were taught to use the dumb-
bells by old Louis Huguenin.
John Hulley was long the favourite and destined successor of Huguenin. He had previously matriculated
at the Collegiate Institution in Shaw-street, and it was at the "College" as it was called, that young Hulley
first developed those peculiarities and eccentricities which made him a local notability. Who can forget
him in his Highland costume or disporting himself on the steps of the Athenaeum in a suit of velveteen?
"How old is Hulley?" inquired Albert Smith of Joe Nightingale, after the latter had introduced him to the
future gymnasiarch. "Just turned velveteen" was Joe's witty reply.
In due time Huguenin vanished from the scene of his useful labours, and the uncrowned king of the
local gymnasts reigned in his stead. From that time, Hulley became a man of mark, and whenever he
took his walks or drives abroad he as the observed of all observers and the admired of all admirers. I
think he courted and desired public notice and adulation, for he seemed to take great delight in being
stared - and laughed - at.
He occasionally drove through the streets in the business shandry of a relative who was located at
Huyton, and when he did so he was always in picturesque costume. He was a conspicuous and
prominent figure at every local fete and festive gathering, and no gals, fancy fair, or public entertainment
was complete without him. Many people thought him just a little cracked, but he as a really good fellow
at heart, and was as harmless as he was amusing. There certainly was method in his madness, but to
my own mind Hulley was always as sane as a lawyer - or an alderman!
I have usually regarded professional gymnasts, off the stage, or out of the sawdust ring, as crosses
between acrobats and pantomimists, but there was nothing mountebankeish about John Hulley. He
and I were intimate and firm friends during many years, and I always fund him most gentlemanly,
affectionate, and warm-hearted.
I forget his business motto of mens sana &c. (mens insana the local wags used to pronounce it) but I
believe John always used it in his prayers , and always boasted that he acted up to it. He had a firm and
abiding faith in dumb-bells, clubs, horizontal bars, and the other "properties" of his business, and he
regarded the practice of "Jim's-nasty-tricks" as the very noblest work that a man could devote himself to.
When political or other local fetes were being celebrated, John Hulley was equally at home in Knowsley
Park, on the stage of the Amphitheatre, at Hengler's Circus, or on the sand at Llandudno. At the latter
place, in conjunction with his friend Colonel Hugh Molyneaux Walmsley, the son of a noted old Liver-
-pudlian, he once livened up the pleasant town with a torchlight procession of boats. Hulley was also a
frequent contributor to the local papers, and in 1867, in collaboration with my old friend and brother
Savage, Mr. E.G. Ravenstein, he published "A Handbook of Gymnastics and Reference," a work which is
still popular on those subjects.
Soon after this time the gymnasiarch in embryo took to foreign travel for the promulgation of his peculiar
doctrines, and later he roamed through the backwoods of America, teaching his "noble art" in every
village and settlement though which he passed, and driving a whole tribe of Red Indians into the forest
by a mere flourish of the huge clubs, which he handled like bulrushes.
It was during his career at Liverpool that those arrant humbugs and sham spiritualists, the Davenport
Brothers, honoured the town with a professional visit. The cunning charlatans had previously been
performing in Manchester, where their "Tom Fool's Knot" was untied and their "mysterious cabinet"
secrets were discovered and disclosed by Mr. Henry Irving and Mr. Fred Mccabe. in Liverpool, at the
Small Concert-room in St. George's Hall, the Davenports were similarly exposed and humiliated by
John Hulley and Major "Bob" Cummins. Night after night those plucky Dick Sams confronted the Yank-
-ee imposters, and so cleverly and cunningly imitated every trick performed by the showmen that the
latter were fairly driven from the town. This plucky achievement greatly increased John Hulley's local
popularity.
But it was not until the year 1865 that the dream of Hulley's life was fulfilled. Hitherto he had enjoyed a
practical monopoly of the local gymnastic business, and, although he was not entirely unopposed, the
old Huguenin connection stuck to him, and kept him fully employed. But in 1865 the Myrtle-street
Gymnasium was opened, and Hulley was appointed to the proud position of the first and only Gymnas-
-iarch. How well and faithfully he fulfilled the duties of his high office known to scores of his old pupils,
and to many of his still surviving friends and acquaintances.
When still in the prime of life, and with his faculties and energies unimpaired, the worthy Gymnasiarch
of Liverpool was called to that bourne from which no gymnast returns, the local gymnast broke into
loud lamentation over the loss of their beloved leader. The local papers sang paeans of praise over
him, and one or two of them, which had ridiculed his harmless eccentricities, wept over the dead
gymnasts' bier.
John Hulley, professor of gymnastics and Gymnasiarch, is still a pleasant memory in this native city,
and his surviving pupils retain an affectionate remembrance of their old teacher. Hulley was born with
a mission, which he fulfilled; and, take him for all and all, we may never see his like again.
*Union Court

1895 23 Mar - Yorkshire Gazette - YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY - REFERENCE DEPARTMENT.This department in
connection wth the Lending Library in now open to the public, who may consult books in accordance
with the rules. Subjoined is a further list of volumes contained therein, which ae classified on the
Dewey system. Dates are shown within brackets:-
(inc.) 613-71/R Ravenstein and Hully: The Gymnasium and its Fittings (1867).

2001 Winter - Extract from the Journal of Olympic History Winter 2001

Organic Olympism Or Olympic Orgy:
The Roots of Modern Olympism and the Mystery of John Hulley
Written by Don Anthony

The National Olympian Association sorely missed the energy and drive of Hulley. He had become
very close to Brookes after his visit to Wenlock in the early 1860’s. Perhaps Brookes saw him as a
“Crown Prince” of the Olympian Movement? The facts speak for themselves: the National Olympian
Games had a good start in London in 1866; their second festival, in Birmingham, a year later was
also outstanding and, among other things, poetry competition were instituted.
Thereafter they tended to fizzle out and finally expired in 1883, despite a renewed attempt at revival in
1874. It seems that Hulley was the missing dynamo. 1867 seems to be the defining date when he
completed his joint book with Ravenstein and then began his overseas travel and battle against ill-
health.
In that same year, Hulley expressed his thoughts nicely about the link between physical education
and the Olympic idea. He said: ‘What I desire to impress upon you is that Olympic Festivals are not
the end of physical education. Physical Education, or rather its dissemination, is the end. Olympian
festivals are a means of securing that end.’
Four years earlier he had delivered a lecture setting out what was, in his view, an Olympic Education:

The need for athletic institutes for public gymnastic exercises
…… for both sexes ….in all our towns and cities for ‘the free
use of the people. ………..… an agreeable resort for the aged
and a pastime for the young.’

Such a development would do more to safeguard the country than miles of
fortifications. A correct system of political and religious education ‘should embrace
a proper exercise of the body and the intellect’. ‘Partial comprehension’ had
resulted in ‘people of warm hearts and good sense’ to believe ‘that sound morals
and high intellect could be evolved without the full growth, strength, and perfect
harmonious development of the human body.’

Such thoughts were not only pertinent 140 years ago; they are highly relevant today when ‘public
exercise’ is more and more abandoned to the forces of globalisation and commerce.

Hulley was certainly a tour de force. He began to define Olympism long before the formation of the
International Olympic Committee. Like Brookes and Ravenstein he influenced the thinking of the
young Coubertin.

2008 16 Apr - the grave of John Hulley has been located at the Smithdown Road cemetery in Liverpool at General
Section G, grave number 493. This is on the left hand side of the right hand roadway from the main
entrance and is the 7th grave before the intersection of the path which goes across the middle of the
cemetery. There is a sketch plan at the entrance to the cemetery showing the various sections.
The gravestone has been pushed on to its back, presumably because it was in a dangerous and loose
condition, but the inscription is just readable although several of the lead letters are missing.

Note by Ray Hulley :
I am greatly indebted to Dr. Don Anthony, Founder Member of the Olympians, Member of the
International Society of Olympic Historians and visiting Professor of the Eastern Mediteranean
University for his assistance in compiling some of the above nformation on the career of John Hulley.

2009 25 Jun - John Hulley grave renovated and re-dedicated

2009 25 Jun - Article for The Journal of Olympic History

Mystery of Olympic co-founder finally laid to rest
By Ray Hulley

I was fascinated by an article written by Dr. Don Anthony Life Member of the Wenlock Olympian Society
and an Executive Member International Society of Olympic Historians in the Winter 2001 edition of the
Journal of Olympic History entitled “Organic Olympism or Olympic Orgy: The Roots of Modern Olympism
and the Mystery of John Hulley”.
As a family historian this intrigued me and set me off on a challenge to discover more about the myste-
rious John Hulley, a task which has occupied most of my time in the two years since reading Dr.
Anthony’s article. I eventually tracked down the location of John Hulley’s grave in Smithdown Road
cemetery Liverpool and visited the site only to find that his grave had been badly damaged by industrial
pollution and acid rain during the 134 years of its existence. The headstone had been laid down to
prevent accidents, the inscription was barely readable and the overall condition was extremely poor.
I contacted Dr Anthony and together with another interested person - Mr Ray Physick, a Lecturer and
research student at te University of Central Lancashire and author of several sports history books - we
formed the John Hulley Memorial Fund to raise funds for the grave’s restoration. A website was
published at www.johnhulleymemorialfund.co.uk and I contacted the IOC and BOA seeking financial
support for our endeavours. Donations were received from each of these bodies as well as from ex-
Olympic athletes, prominent people in Liverpool and a wide range of other sources.
In February 2009 we were well on the way to reaching
our target and I arranged with Welsbys (Memorials) Ltd., Liverpool monumental masons to carry out the
necessary repair and renovation work. We were advised that the gravestone was made of white Italian
marble and that it would be brought back to its original condition. Having seen the current state of it, I
was extremely sceptical!
We decided that the original inscription should be supplemented so that John Hulley’s memory and his
ideals for the Olympic movement would be enshrined in Liverpool and British sporting history. Also,
although the title “Gymnasiarch” was originally self-styled and initially derided by the hoi-polloi of
Liverpool, time showed that he indeed a master of the gymnastic arts and his organisational abilities
and achievements in that field fully merited the title. The words “ Liverpool Gymnasiarch Co-founder of
the National Olympian Association 1865” and “Renovated by Public Subscription 2009” were added to
the gravestone to fulfil this requirement.
A ceremony of re-dedication was held at the cemetery on Sunday 14 June 2009 and under a bright
sunny sky, a ceremony was conducted by the Revd. Graham Murphy BA Dip.Post.Theol Minister of the
Ancient Chapel of Toxteth Park, Liverpool, the chapel where John Hulley was married. Revd. Murphy
ended his remarks with the following:
Hulley looked to improve physical health in the vicinity of where people in the age of industry ordinarily
lived and worked. Until now, Hulley has suffered from obscurity following his early death. Let the rest-
-oration of his grave be an end to that. It is with great pleasure that I declare this restoration to be the
granting to John Hulley of a place in history, which he undoubtedly deserves.
The ceremony was followed by the unveiling of the Olympic flag, which had been kindly loaned by the
IOC and laid on the grave , by the 3 trustees who each laid a wreath of laurel leaves centred with
flowers matching the Olympic colours. Invited guests then left the cemetery and proceeded to the
Liverpool Hope University where Dr Stephan Wassong Associate Professor, Sport Department,
Deanery of Sciences and Social Science, gave a lecture on “Olympic Values”. The day’s events ended
with a buffet in the refectory provided by the University’s catering staff.
Future developments in the John Hulley story are to consider the possibility of a permanent award in
his name to an appropriate organisation in Liverpool, and an entry in the Dictionary of National
Biography.
Ray Hulley DMS
Fellow of the Manchester and Lancashire Family History Society.

2012 24 May - OXFORD DICTIONARY OF NATIONAL BIOGRAPHY

Hulley, John (1832-1875), promoter of physical education, was born at 10 Gloucester Street, Liverpool, on 19 February 1832, the only son of John Nevitt Hulley (bap. 1803, d. 1840), surgeon, and his wife, Elizabeth, née Speed (1798-1890). He was baptized at St David's Church, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, on 19 July 1832. His four uncles, grandfather, and great grandfather were all in the medical profession. From an early age he had a keen interest in physical education and fitness. From 1845 to 1850 Hulley attended the school in Victoria Buildings, Lord Street, run by Louis Huguenin, the Swiss gymnast who had settled in Liverpool in 1844. In about 1850 he matriculated from the Collegiate Institute, Shaw Street, Liverpool. He organized an ‘assault-at-arms’ at the Theatre Royal, Williamson Square, in April 1861 and gave another ‘grand assault-at-arms’ in December 1861. In 1862 he went into partnership with Samuel Ackerley and opened the Rotunda Gymnasium in Bold Street, Liverpool. In January 1862 Hulley and the Liverpool businessman and philanthropist Charles Pierre Melly founded the Liverpool Athletic Club, of which Melly was the first president and Hulley the honorary secretary. Under the club's auspices, Hulley organized the first Grand Olympic Festival, held in June 1862 at the Mount Vernon parade ground in Liverpool and attended by 10,000 spectators. Subsequent Olympic festivals took place in Liverpool in June 1863 and July 1864, the latter at the Zoological Gardens. Intended to promote ‘manly exercises and sports’, the Olympic festivals used the motto Mens sana in corpore sano, and were open to gentlemen amateurs, competing in events such as running, swordsmanship, boxing, gymnastics, jumping, throwing, and dumb-bell exercises. Gold, silver, and bronze medals were awarded. The festivals of July 1865 and July 1866 were held in Llandudno, before returning to Liverpool for their final staging, in June-July 1867. After the Rotunda Gymnasium partnership with Ackerley was dissolved, Hulley and Melly formed another company and found a suitable site for their new Liverpool Gymnasium in Myrtle Street. Reckoned one of the best-equipped gymnasiums in Europe at the time, it was opened in November 1865 by Lord Stanley. Hulley, who styled himself ‘the Gymnasiarch’, was employed as the gymnasium's first director. On the day of its opening, he chaired the meeting at the gymnasium which established the National Olympian Association. The association's purpose was ‘the encouragement and reward of skill and strength in manly exercises’ at annual meetings held in rotation in the principal cities or towns of Great Britain (Polley, 67). Its founding meeting was attended by William Penny Brookes, promoter of the Wenlock Olympian Games, and the founder of the German Gymnasium in London, Ernst Ravenstein, whom Hulley had met earlier that year and with whom he collaborated in writing a handbook of gymnastics and a guide to fitting up gymnasiums, both published in 1867. Hulley attended the first National Olympian Games held in London on 31 July 1866, at Teddington, for the swimming, and at the Crystal Palace cricket ground for other events, on 1 August. A second games was held in Birmingham in July 1867, but the National Olympian Association subsequently foundered in the face of rivalry from the Amateur Athletic Club. Hulley married, on 16 July 1869, at the Ancient Unitarian Chapel, Toxteth Park, Georgiana (1839-1890), the only daughter of Robert Lewin Bolton, an extremely prosperous merchant, and grand-daughter of Thomas Bolton, a former mayor of Liverpool. The marriage took place in the face of well publicized parental opposition, the bride's father having thwarted an earlier wedding by locking her in her room. They had a daughter, Georgiana Theodosia, born in 1870. Latterly Hulley suffered from a pulmonary illness, and wintered in Algiers and Nice. He remained in Liverpool in the winter of 1874-5. Severe weather proved fatal and he died at his home, 91 Grove Street, Liverpool, of emphysema and bronchitis, on 6 January 1875. He was survived by his wife and daughter. He was buried in Smithdown Lane cemetery, Liverpool, where his grave was restored in 2009 after a campaign by historians (Polley, 65). Ray Hulley
Sources
Liverpool Mercury (8 Jan 1875); (12 Jan 1875) · Porcupine (9 Jan 1875) · Liverpool Citizen (25 Feb 1888) · D. Anthony, ‘Organic Olympism or Olympic orgy: the roots of modern Olympism and the mystery of John Hulley’, Journal of Olympic History (winter 2001), 13-18 · M. Polley, The British Olympics: Britain's Olympic heritage, 1612-2012 (2011) · www.johnhulley-olympics.co.uk <http://www.oxforddnb.com/public/jumpto.jsp?url=http://www.johnhulley-olympics.co.uk>, accessed on 20 July 2011 · baptismal register, St David's, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool · census returns, 1841, 1851, 1861, 1871 · m. cert. · d. cert.
Likenesses
line drawing, c.1865, repro. in Polley, British Olympics, 56 · R. Hulley, line drawing, repro. in www.johnhulley-olympics.co.uk/ <http://www.oxforddnb.com/public/jumpto.jsp?url=http://www.johnhulley-olympics.co.uk
-© Oxford University Press 200412 <http://www.oxforddnb.com/oxforddnb/legal/> All rights reserved: see legal notice <http://www.oxforddnb.com/oxforddnb/legal/>

Ray Hulley, ‘Hulley, John (1832-1875)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, May 2012 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/100990, accessed 5 June 2012] John Hulley (1832-1875): doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/100990

2014 25 Apr - The Unveiling ceremony of the John Hulley Memorial plaque
at the Lifestyles Park Road Sports Centre, Liverpool
The plaque commemorating the life and work of the Liverpool Gymnasiarch John Hulley was unveiled
on Friday 25 April 2014 by the Lord-Lieutenant of Merseyside and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool at the
Lifestyles Park Road Sports Centre.
Before an audience of invited guests, Tom Southern, Director of Operation Pathfinder and member of
the John Hulley Olympic Festival committee, welcomed everyone to the ceremony and introduced
Robin Baynes MBE founder of the Liverpool Heartbeat charity, and myself as keynote speakers at the
ceremony. Robin gave an overview of the John Hulley Olympic Festival and the current work in hand to
publicise forthcoming events, and I spoke of how I researched the life and death of John Hulley and the
work necessary to renovate and rededicate his grave.
Tom Southern then invited the Lord-Lieutenant (Dame Lorna E F Muirhead DBE) to address the
gathering before presenting the plaque on behalf of her Majesty the Queen to The Lord Mayor
Councillor Gary Millar who accepted it on behalf of the city of Liverpool. The plaque will be sited within
the Sports Centre, wall-mounted alongside the trophy cabinet and other memorabilia.

After the unveiling ceremony and closing remarks, Dame Lorna expressed an interest in visiting the
renovated grave of John Hulley. She asked me, together with my wife Joan and sister-in-law Elisabeth,
to accompany her in the official car the short distance to the nearby Smithdown Road cemetery.

Pictures of the Unveiling ceremony are at the following website:-

http://www.johnhulley-olympics.co.uk/memorialplaque.shtml

FULL DETAILS OF THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JOHN HULLEY ARE SHOWN AT

http://www.johnhulley-olympics.co.uk

ALSO AT

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hulley

.


Georgina Bolton

1840 - born at Liverpool - see 1871 census below.

1851 census
HO 107/ 2182 f 372 4 Gamber Terrace Liverpool
R. L. Bolton Head M 44 American merchant Lancs Liverpool
J. S. Bolton Wife M 46 Lancs Liverpool
T.F. Bolton Son U 20 American merchant Jnr Lancs Liverpool
George Bolton Son U 18 American merchant Jnr Lancs Liverpool
Georgiana Bolton Dau 11 Scholar at home Lancs Liverpool
Wm. Bolton Son 8 Scholar at home Lancs Liverpool
Christopher Son 6 Scholar at home Lancs Liverpool
John Holt Visitor U 39 Retired merchant Lancs Liverpool
Mary Kermode Serv U 36 House serv Lancs Liverpool
June Hagan Serv U 24 House serv Lancs Liverpool
Mary Llewellyn Serv U 21 House serv Shrops Churchstoke
Sarah Warr Serv U 26 House serv Staffs Wednesbury

1861 census
RG 9/2708 f60r Aigburth Road Toxteth Park Liverpool
Robert L. Bolton Head M 54 American Merchant Lancs Liverpool
J. S. Bolton Wife M 56 Lancs Liverpool
Robert J. Bolton Son U 24 Lancs Liverpool
Georgiana Bolton Dau U 21 Lancs Liverpool
William Bolton Son U 19 Lancs Liverpool
Charles H. Bolton Son U 16 Lancs Liverpool
Margaret Kermode Serv U 46 House Servant Lancs Liverpool
Margaret Baxter Serv W 36 House Servant Scotland
Mary Drummond Serv U 36 House Servant Scotland
Catherine Dryedale Serv U 20 House Servant Scotland

1869 4 Jul - married at the Ancient Unitarian Chapel Toxteth Park Liverpool: John Hulley 37 years
Bachelor Gymnasiarch Myrtle Street Liverpool - father John Hulley (deceased) Surgeon;
Georgina Bolton 29 years Spinster Laurel Mount Aigburth - father Robert Lewin Bolton
Merchant. Wits: Robert Trimble, Caroline Avison.

1870 Dec qtr - dau Georgina Theodosia born at Liverpool RD: Hulley Georgiana Theodosis Liverpool
8b 158 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3783 f6 Liverpool 91 Grove Street
John Hulley Head M 38 Gymnasiarch Professor Liverpool
Georgiana Hulley Wife M 31 Liverpool
Elizabeth Hulley Mther W 73 Flintshire Overton
Georgina Hulley Dau 6mos Liverpool
Margaret Hughes Servt U 26 Domestic Liverpool
Ann Hughes Servt U 20 Domestic Liverpool

1875 6 Jan - husband died at 91 Grove Street Liverpool: John Hulley Male 42 years Gentleman -
cause of death - Emphysema of Lungs Bronchitis Certified by A. Waters M.D. Informant
- E. Hulley Mother In attendance Grove Street.

1881 census
RG 11/3652 f51Laurel Mount Toxteth Park
Robert L. Bolton Head W 74 Annuitant Lpool, Lancs
Georgina Hulley Dau W 41 Annuitant Lpool, Lancs
Thos. F. Bolton Visitr 60 Annuitant Lpool, Lancs
G.T. Hulley G-dau U 10 Scholar Lpool, Lancs
Thos.G. Bolton G-son U 24 Commercial Clerk Dublin, Ireland
Mary Stewart Serv W 64 Serv Scotland
Jane Steen Serv W 69 Dom Serv Cook Churton, Ches
Annie Beard Serv U 21 Dom Serv Waitress Bollington, Ches
M.T. Martin Serv U 16 Dom Serv Housemaid Lpool, Lancs

1884 Jan 11 - The TImes - Sales by Auction - Hulley v. Bolton - Pursuant to an Order of the Court of
Chancery of the County Palatine of Lancaster made in the above cause. To be Sold by
Auction, by Mr. Orlando Shellard at the Green Dragon Hotel Hereford, on Wednesday,
the 30th day January, 1884, at 3 o’clock for 4 o’clock in the afternoon precisely
TWENTY £6 per cent. stock fully paid up Debentures of £1,000 each, No. 1 to 20
inclusive, of the Golden Valley Railway Company etc.

1885 03 Mar - Morning Post - SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE - COURT OF APPEAL -
Court II - Before Lord Justice Cotton Lord Justice Bowen, and Lord Justice Fry. At
10½ - On Thursday next county petition appeals will be taken in Court II., when the
following cases will be in the paper for hearing:- (incl.) Hulley v. Bolton. (also on Mar
4, 5. 6).

1884 05 Mar - Morning Post - SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE - Final Appeals - Re. L. Bolton,
deceased (Hulley v. Bolton) (also shown on April 04 1884).

1885 07 Mar - The Times - Law Notices, This Day (Saturday), March 7. Supreme Court of Judicature - the Court of
Appeal. Appeal Court II - Appeal from the County Palatine Court of Lancaster (General List). Re Bolton,
deceased (Hulley v. Bolton).

1885 30 Mar - The Manchester Guardian: CHANCERY OF LANCASHIRE (MANCHESTER DISTRICT) - The following
cases are down for hearing today: Hulley v. Bolton.

1885 06 Jul - The Manchester Guardian: CHANCERY OF LANCASHIRE (MANCHESTER DISTRICT) - The following is
a list of cases to be heard today: Motions: Liverpool: Hulley v. Bolton.

1889 06 Aug - Western Mail - A Glamorganshire Banking Case - Summary - Glamorganshire Banking Company. (Ltd)
v. Cwmavon Works Proprietors; action was to recover the balance of an account overdrawn by Samuel
Danks who had been appointed receiver and manager of the Cwmavon Works by order of the Vice-
Chancellor of the County Palatine of Lancaster in the administration action of Hulley and Bolton. The
Works had been sold for between £140,000 and £150,000. Appeal dismissed, plaintiffs undertook that
in the event of obtaining judgement against Mr. Danks, they would not issue execution without the leave
of the judge who tried the case.

1890 Dec qtr - died at Toxteth Park RD: Hulley Georgiana 51 Toxteth Park 8b 178 (GRO).

1890 28 Oct - died at Liverpool - see death announcement below.

1890 Oct 30 - Liverpool Mercury - Deaths - Hulley - Oct. 28, at her residence, Glenhyrst, Dingle-lane, Georgiana, widow
of the late John Hulley, and only daughter of the late Robert Lewin Bolton, of Aigburth. (also on Oct 31,
Nov 1)

1890 - 3 Nov - death announcement in The Times:
On the 28th Oct., at her residence, Glenhyrst, Dingle-lane, Liverpool, GEORGIANA, widow of the late JOHN HULLEY, and only daughter of the late Robert Lewin Bolton, of Aigburth.

1890 22 Nov - Somerset House Will and Admin indexes
HULLEY Georgiana Personal Estate £28,227.17s.6d
The Will with a Codicil of Georgiana Hulley late of Glenhyrst Dingle Lane Liverpool in the County of
Lancaster Widow who died 28 Oct 1890 at Glenhyrst was proved at Liverpool by Sydney Style of 3
Union Court Castle Street Liverpool Solicitor and John Sutherland Harmood Banner of 24 North St
John Street Liverpool Chartered Accountant the Executors.

1890 Dec 18 - Liverpool Mercury Legal Notices. Georgiana Hulley, Deceased. Pursuant to the Act of Parliament 22nd
and 23rd Vict. c35, Notice is hereby given to all creditors and other persons having any claim or
demands on the estate of Georgiana Hulley, late of "Glenhyrst," Dingle-Lane, Liverpool, in the County of
Lancaster, widow, deceased (who died on the 28th day of October, 1890, and whose will was proved in
the District Registry at Liverpool of the Probate Division of the High Court of Justice on the 25th day of
November, 1890, by the undersigned, Sydney Style, and John Sutherland Harmood Banner, of 24,
North John-street, Liverpool, aforesaid, the executors named in the said will), are hereby required to
send in writing full particulars of such claims and demands to the said executors on or before the 17th
day of January, 1891, after which date the said executors will proceed to distribute the assets of the said
testatrix among the persons entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims and demands of which
they shall then have notice, and that they will not be liable for the assets of the said testatrix, or any part
thereof, so distributed to any person of whose debt or claim they shall not then have had notice. Dated
this first day of December, 1890. Sydney Style, Solicitor for the said Executors, 3, Union-court, Castle-
Street, Liverpool.


167. Jonathan Hooley

1837-39 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Jonathan Cheadle Stockport CHD/1/53.

1839 Jun qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Jonathan Stockport 19 222 (GRO).

1839 24 Nov - baptised at St Mary's church Cheadle: Jonathan s.of James & Mary HOOLEY Cheadle
Bulkeley Farmer

1841 census
HO 107/99/11 f3 Cheadle Bulkley Gill Bent
James Hooley 30 Farmer N
Mary Hooley 25 Y
Martha Hooley 5 Y
Jonathan Hooley 2 Y

1851 census
HO 107/2157 f537r Cheadle Moseley Gill Bent
John Hooley Head M 70 Farmer of 70 acres Ches Handford
Martha Hooley Wife M 60 Farmer's Wife Heaton Norris Lancs
James Hooley Son W 39 Farmer's Son Lancs Heaton Norris
Elizabeth Hooley G-dau 13 Scholar Cheadle Moseley Ches
Jonathan Hooley G-son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Hooley G-dau 9 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Benjamin Shore Serv U 18 Farm Servant Ches Stockport
William Owen Serv U 20 Ches Adswood

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f114r Cheadle Mosely No location
Martha Hooley Head W 74 Farmer 34 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
James Hooley Son W 50 Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son U 32 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Jonathan Hooley G-son U 21 Farm Servt Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Hooley G-dau U 19 House maid Ches Cheadle Moseley
Samuel Burrows Servt U 22 Carter Ches Cheadle Moseley

1861-65 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Jonathan SLATER Grace Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/11/239.

1864 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Jonathan Stockport 8a 13 (GRO).

1864 - son James's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY James Stockport First Stockport
ST1/53/100.

1864 Dec qtr - son James born at Stockport RD: Hooley James Stockport 8a 13 (GRO).

1869 - son Thomas - 2 birth entries from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas Stockport First
Stockport ST1/63/22 and HOOLEY Thomas Stockport First Stockport ST1/63/59.

1869 Sep Qtr - son Thomas born at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 8a 46 or 89 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3662 f22 Stockport 18 Carrington Field St.
Jonathan Hooley Head M 32 Out door Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Grace Hooley Wife M 31 Ches Withington
James Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Stockport
Thomas Hooley Son 2 Scholar Ches Stockport

1871 - wife's death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Grace 31Stockport First Stockport
ST1/56/60.

1871 Sep qtr - wife died at Stockport RD: Hooley Grace 31 Stockport 8a 39 (GRO).

1871 - son Thomas's death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas 2 Stockport First
Stockport ST1/56/82

1871 Dec qtr - son Thomas died at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 8a 41 (GRO).

1871-75 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Jonathan WRIGHT Catherine Stockport, St
Mary Stockport ST16/22/135.

1875 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Jonathan Stockport 8a 101 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3478 f122 23 Heaviley Stockport
Jonothan Hoolley Head M 41 Dom. Gardener & Provision Dealer Ches Cheadle
Catherine Hoolley Wife M 45 Wife Lancs Manchester
James Hoolley Son U 16 Dom. Gardener Ches Stockport

1891 census
RG 12/2802 f33 Stockport 28 Dundonald St
Jonathan Hooley Head M 52 Grave Digger Ches Cheadle Hulme
Catherine Hooley Wife M 57 Ches Bollington

1897 - death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Jonathan 58 Stockport First Stockport ST1/106/63.

1897 Jun qtr - died at Stockport RD: Hooley Jonathan Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).


Grace Slater

1840 - born at Withington Cheshire - see 1851 census below.

1861-65 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Jonathan SLATER Grace Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/11/239.

1864 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Jonathan Stockport 8a 13 (GRO).

1864 - son James's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY James Stockport First Stockport
ST1/53/100.

1864 Dec qtr - son James born at Stockport RD: Hooley James Stockport 8a 13 (GRO).

1869 - son Thomas - 2 birth entries from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas Stockport First
Stockport ST1/63/22 and HOOLEY Thomas Stockport First Stockport ST1/63/59.

1869 Sep qtr - son Thomas born at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 8a 46 or 89 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3662 f22 Stockport 18 Carrington Field St.
Jonathan Hooley Head M 32 Out door Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Grace Hooley Wife M 31 Ches Withington
James Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Stockport
Thomas Hooley Son 2 Scholar Ches Stockport

1871 - death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Grace 31Stockport First Stockport ST1/56/60.

1871 Sep qtr - died at Stockport RD: Hooley Grace 31 Stockport 8a 39 (GRO).


256. James Hooley

1864 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY James Stockport First Stockport ST1/53/100.

1864 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley James Stockport 8a 13 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3662 f22 Stockport 18 Carrington Field St.
Jonathan Hooley Head M 32 Out door Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Grace Hooley Wife M 31 Ches Withington
James Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Stockport
Thomas Hooley Son 2 Scholar Ches Stockport

1881 census
RG 11/3478 f122 23 Heaviley Stockport
Jonothan Hoolley Head M 41 Dom. Gardener & Provision Dealer Ches Cheadle
Catherine Hoolley Wife M 45 Wife Lancs Manchester
James Hoolley Son U 16 Dom. Gardener Ches Stockport


257. Thomas Hooley

1869 - 2 birth entries from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas Stockport First Stockport ST1/63/22
HOOLEY Thomas Stockport First Stockport ST1/63/59.

1869 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 8a 46 and 89 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3662 f22 Stockport 18 Carrington Field St.
Jonathan Hooley Head M 32 Out door Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Grace Hooley Wife M 31 Ches Withington
James Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Stockport
Thomas Hooley Son 2 Scholar Ches Stockport

1871 - death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas 2 Stockport First Stockport ST1/56/82

1871 Dec qtr - died at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 8a 41 (GRO).


Catherine Wright

1836 - born at Manchester - see 1881 census below

1871-75 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Jonathan WRIGHT Catherine Stockport, St
Mary Stockport ST16/22/135.

1875 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Jonathan Stockport 8a 101 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3478 f122 23 Heaviley Stockport
Jonothan Hoolley Head M 41 Dom. Gardener & Provision Dealer Ches Cheadle
Catherine Hoolley Wife M 45 Wife Lancs Manchester
James Hoolley Son U 16 Dom. Gardener Ches Stockport

1891 census
RG 12/2802 f33 Stockport 28 Dundonald St
Jonathan Hooley Head M 52 Grave Digger Ches Cheadle Hulme
Catherine Hooley Wife M 57 Ches Bollington

1897 - husband's death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Jonathan 58 Stockport First Stockport
ST1/106/63.

1897 Jun qtr - husband died at Stockport RD: Hooley Jonathan Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).


168. Mary Hooley

1840-45 - birth entry in ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary Cheadle Stockport CHD/2/26.

1842 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hoolery Mary Stockport 19 236 (GRO).

1851 census
HO 107/2157 f537r Cheadle Moseley Gill Bent
John Hooley Head M 70 Farmer of 70 acres Ches Handford
Martha Hooley Wife M 60 Farmer's Wife Heaton Norris Lancs
James Hooley Son W 39 Farmer's Son Lancs Heaton Norris
Elizabeth Hooley G-dau 13 Scholar Cheadle Moseley Ches
Jonathan Hooley G-son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Hooley G-dau 9 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Benjamin Shore Serv U 18 Farm Servant Ches Stockport
William Owen Serv U 20 Ches Adswood

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f114r Cheadle Mosely No location
Martha Hooley Head W 74 Farmer 34 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
James Hooley Son W 50 Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son U 32 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Jonathan Hooley G-son U 21 Farm Servt Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Hooley G-dau U 19 House maid Ches Cheadle Moseley
Samuel Burrows Servt U 22 Carter Ches Cheadle Moseley

1861-65 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary DAVENPORT James Heaton Norris,
Christ Church Stockport ST5/2/127.

1864 Dec qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Stockport 8a 45 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f139r Cheadle Moseley Stringers Farm
Martha Hooley Head W 86 Farmer of 44 acres Lancs Heaton Norris
James Hooley Son W 64 Farmer Lancs Heaton Norris
James Davenport Grandson M 31 Farm Servant Ches Bramall
Mary Davenport Granddau M 28 Domestic servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Davenport G-G-dau 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Edward Davenport Servt U 23 Farm Servant Indoor Ches Bramall
Mark Barber Servt U 17 Ches Cheadle Hulme


James Davenport

1840 - born at Bramall - see 1871 census below

1861-65 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary DAVENPORT James Heaton Norris,
Christ Church Stockport ST5/2/127.

1864 Dec qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Stockport 8a 45 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f139r Cheadle Moseley Stringers Farm
Martha Hooley Head W 86 Farmer of 44 acres Lancs Heaton Norris
James Hooley Son W 64 Farmer Lancs Heaton Norris
James Davenport Grandson M 31 Farm Servant Ches Bramall
Mary Davenport Granddau M 28 Domestic servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Davenport G-G-dau 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Edward Davenport Servt U 23 Farm Servant Indoor Ches Bramall
Mark Barber Servt U 17 Ches Cheadle Hulme


169. Thomas Hooley

1840-45 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas Cheadle Stockport CHD/1/69.
OR HOOLEY Thomas Cheadle Stockport CHD/2/90.

1840 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 19 214 (GRO).

1840 2 Feb - baptised at St Mary's church Cheadle: Thomas s.of John & Ann HOOLEY Cheadle
Hulme Farmer.

1841 census
HO 107/99/17 f10 Cheadle Moseley Hulme Hall
John Hooley 25 Farmer (+ 2 Serv, 6 Labs) Y
Anne Hooley 20 Y
Thomas Hooley 1 Y

1851 census
HO 107/2157 f530 Cheadle Moseley Hulme Hall
John Hooley Head M 39 Farmer of 89 acres empl 2 Labs Lancs Heaton
Ann Hooley Wife M 32 Farmer's Wife Ches Peover
Thomas Hooley Son 11 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son 9 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Betsy Hooley Dau 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Sarah Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Dau 4mos Ches Cheadle Moseley
Martha Hooley Niece 15 Silk Weaver by Hand Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Groule Serv U 24 House Servant Ireland Clunfiens?
John Leigh Serv U 22 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
Isaac Leigh Serv U 20 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
John Swindells Lodger 38 Ag Lab Ches Bramall

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f108 Cheadle Mosely Hulme Hall
John Hooley Head M 48 Farmer 60 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Wife M 43 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Moseley
Thomas Hooley Son U 21 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son U 19 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
Betsy Hooley Dau 16 Farmer's Dau Ches Cheadle Moseley
Louisa Hooley Dau 7 Ches Cheadle Moseley
John Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Martha Powell Servt U 14 Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
Edward Thomason Servt U 16 Carter Ches Cheadle Moseley

1861 - 1866 - remarried to Sarah ............... from Nottingham.
Note a check of the GRO marriage indexes between the two above dates shows the
following marriages for Thomas Hooley:
1862 Jun qtr - Basford 7b 154
1863 Dec qtr - Liverpool 8b 292
1864 Mar qtr - Liverpool 8b 109
1864 Dec qtr - Preston 8e 548
1865 Sep qtr - Chorlton 8c 603
1865 Sep qtr - Manchester 8d 275

Because Sarah came from Nottingham, the one listed in Jun qtr 1862 is probably the correct one.

1866 - son James's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY James Cheadle Stockport CHD/9/43.

1866 Mar qtr - son James born at Stockport RD: Hooley James Stockport 8a 75 (GRO).

1870 - dau Ada's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Ada Cheadle Stockport CHD/10/94.

1870 Sep qtr - dau Ada born at Stockport RD: Hooley Ada Stockport 8a 85 (GRO).

1870 - death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas 31Cheadle Stockport CHD/7/50.
(No GRO entry)

1870 11 Jul - entry from NBI: Thomas HOOLEY 30 Cheshire Cheadle Hulme, All Saints.


Sarah ......

1842 - born in Nottinghamshire - see 1871 census below

1861 - 1866 - remarried to Sarah ............... from Nottingham.
Note a checvk of the GRO marriage indexes between the two above dates shows the
following marriages for Thomas Hooley:
1862 Jun qtr - Basford 7b 154
1863 Dec qtr - Liverpool 8b 292
1864 Mar qtr - Liverpool 8b 109
1864 Dec qtr - Preston 8e 548
1865 Sep qtr - Chorlton 8c 603
1865 Sep qtr - Manchester 8d 275

Because Sarah came from Nottingham, the one listed in Jun qtr 1862 is probably the
correct one.

1866 - son James's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY James Cheadle Stockport CHD/9/43.

1866 Mar qtr - son James born at Stockport RD: Hooley James Stockport 8a 75 (GRO).

1870 - dau Ada's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Ada Cheadle Stockport CHD/10/94.

1870 Sep qtr - dau Ada born at Stockport RD: Hooley Ada Stockport 8a 85 (GRO).

1870 - husband's death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas 31Cheadle Stockport
CHD/7/50.

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f82 Cheadle Moseley Street Lane
Sarah Hooley Head W 29 Laundress Nottinghamshire
James Hooley Son 5 Ches Cheadle
Ada Hooley Dau 7mos Ches Cheadle
Elizabeth Adamson Boarder U 16 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle

1873 - son Charles' birth entry from Ches BMD: HOOLEY Charles Cheadle
Stockport CHD/12/18.

1873 Dec qtr - son Charles born at Stockport RD: Hooley Charles Stockport 8a 84 (GRO).

1875 - dau Emily's birth entry from Ches BMD: HOOLEY Emily Cheadle Stockport CHD/13/9.

1875 Dec qtr - dau Emily born at Stockport RD: Hooley Emily Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f23 Brook Ter. Cheadle
Sarah Hooley Head W 40 Laundress Nottingham Notts
James Hooley Son U 15 Outdoor Labourer Cheadle Ches
Ada Hooley Dau 10 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Chas. Hooley Son 7 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Emily Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Ches

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f20r Cheadle 16 Brook Street
Sarah Ann Hooley Head W 48 Laundress Nottinghamshire
Charles Hooley Son S 17 Cotton Bleacher Ches Cheadle Hulme
Emily Hooley Dau S 15 Collar Plater Ches Adswood
Saml. B. Williamson Boarder S 43 Carter Ches Cheadle

1891-96 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Sarah A WILLIAMSON Samuel Cheadle, St
Mary Stockport ST65/18/81.

1897 Sep qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Sarah Ann Stockport 8a 14 (GRO).

1901census
RG 13/3300 f75 Cheadle 55 Stockport Road
Samuel Williamson Head M 49 Labourer at Print Works Ches Cheadle
Sarah A. Williamson Wife M 50 Notts Nottingham
Emily Hooley Dau U 25 Dressmaker Ches Cheadle
James Edwards Boarder M 37 Maker up Piece Goods Lancs Manchester
George Proctor Boarder S 38 Lancs Bolton


260. Ada Hooley

1870 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Ada Cheadle Stockport CHD/10/94.

1870 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Ada Stockport 8a 85 (GRO).


1871 census
RG 10/3666 f82 Cheadle Moseley Street Lane
Sarah Hooley Head W 29 Laundress Nottinghamshire
James Hooley Son 5 Ches Cheadle
Ada Hooley Dau 7mos Ches Cheadle
Elizabeth Adamson Boarder U 16 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f23 Brook Ter. Cheadle
Sarah Hooley Head W 40 Laundress Nottingham Notts
James Hooley Son U 15 Outdoor Labourer Cheadle Ches
Ada Hooley Dau 10 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Chas. Hooley Son 7 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Emily Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Ches

1891 census
RG 12/2805 f40 Cheadle & Gatley 2 The Crescent Gatley Rd
Richard J. Bedell Head M 30 Living on own means (+w, dau s-i-l) Lancs Manchester
Ada Hooley Serv S 20 Domestic Servant General Ches Cheadle Hulme


261. Charles Hooley

1873 - birth entry from Ches BMD: HOOLEY Charles Cheadle Stockport CHD/12/18.

1873 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Charles Stockport 8a 84 (GRO).

1873 24 Sep - birth certificate entry: When and where born:Twenty fourth September 1873 Four Lane
Ends Cheadle Hulme Cheadle Bulkeley; Name: Charles; Sex: Boy; (No father named)
Mother: Sarah Hooley; (No occupation of father) Informant - Sarah Hooley Mother Four
Lane Ends Cheadle Hulme Cheadle Bulkeley; Registrar: James Sidebottom.

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f23 Brook Ter. Cheadle
Sarah Hooley Head W 40 Laundress Nottingham Notts
James Hooley Son U 15 Outdoor Labourer Cheadle Ches
Ada Hooley Dau 10 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Chas. Hooley Son 7 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Emily Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Ches

1885 10 Jun - baptised at St Mary's church Cheadle: Charles s.of Richard & Sarah HOOLEY Cheadle
Heath Labourer. Born Sep 24th 1873.

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f20r Cheadle 16 Brook Street
Sarah Ann Hooley Head W 48 Laundress Nottinghamshire
Charles Hooley Son S 17 Cotton Bleacher Ches Cheadle Hulme
Emily Hooley Dau S 15 Collar Plater Ches Adswood
Saml. B. Williamson Boarder S 43 Carter Ches Cheadle

1898 Jun qtr - died at Bakewell RD: Hooley Charles 24 Bakewell 7f 440 (GRO)
Note: this is the only GRO death entry for a Charles Hooley between 1891 and 1901
that fit Charles's age at the time of death.


262. Emily Hooley

1875 - birth entry from Ches BMD: HOOLEY Emily Cheadle Stockport CHD/13/9.

1875 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Emily Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f23 Brook Ter. Cheadle
Sarah Hooley Head W 40 Laundress Nottingham Notts
James Hooley Son U 15 Outdoor Labourer Cheadle Ches
Ada Hooley Dau 10 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Chas. Hooley Son 7 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Emily Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Ches

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f20r Cheadle 16 Brook Street
Sarah Ann Hooley Head W 48 Laundress Nottinghamshire
Charles Hooley Son S 17 Cotton Bleacher Ches Cheadle Hulme
Emily Hooley Dau S 15 Collar Plater Ches Adswood
Saml. B. Williamson Boarder S 43 Carter Ches Cheadle

1901 census
RG 13/3300 f75 Cheadle 55 Stockport Road
Samuel Williamson Head M 49 Labourer at Print Works Ches Cheadle
Sarah A. Williamson Wife M 50 Notts Nottingham
Emily Hooley Dau U 25 Dressmaker Ches Cheadle
James Edwards Boarder M 37 Maker up Piece Goods Lancs Manchester
George Proctor Boarder S 38 Lancs Bolton


170. William Hooley

1840-45 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William Cheadle Stockport CHD/2/33. - no GRO entry.

1851 census
HO 107/2157 f530 Cheadle Moseley Hulme Hall
John Hooley Head M 39 Farmer of 89 acres empl 2 Labs Lancs Heaton
Ann Hooley Wife M 32 Farmer's Wife Ches Peover
Thomas Hooley Son 11 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son 9 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Betsy Hooley Dau 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Sarah Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Dau 4mos Ches Cheadle Moseley
Martha Hooley Niece 15 Silk Weaver by Hand Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Groule Serv U 24 House Servant Ireland Clunfiens?
John Leigh Serv U 22 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
Isaac Leigh Serv U 20 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
John Swindells Lodger 38 Ag Lab Ches Bramall

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f108 Cheadle Mosely Hulme Hall
John Hooley Head M 48 Farmer 60 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Wife M 43 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Moseley
Thomas Hooley Son U 21 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son U 19 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
Betsy Hooley Dau 16 Farmer's Dau Ches Cheadle Moseley
Louisa Hooley Dau 7 Ches Cheadle Moseley
John Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Martha Powell Servt U 14 Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
Edward Thomason Servt U 16 Carter Ches Cheadle Moseley

1866-70 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William LLOYD Elizabeth Cheadle Hulme, All Saints Stockport
ST66/1/5.

1869 Sep qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley William Stockport 8a 43 (GRO).

1869 18 Sep - Cheshire Observer - MARRIAGES On the 14th inst., at All Saint's, Cheadle Hulme, by the Rev. J. H. D.
Cochrane, M.A., Mr William Hooley of Hulme Hall, Cheshire, to Elizabeth Lloyd, grand-daughter of Mr.
Thomas Lloyd, timber merchant, Northop, Flintshire. (Eldest daughter of Thomas Lloyd in the Cheshire
Chronicle 25 Sep 1869)

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f129 Cheadle Bulkeley Smithy Green Cottage
William Hooley Head M 28 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 22 Wife Flint Wales
Solomon Thompson Boarder U 40 Farm Servant Ches Fulshaw

1872 - dau Alice's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Alice Cheadle Stockport CHD/11/79.

1872 Dec qtr - dau Alice born at Stockport RD: Hooley Alice Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).

1875 - dau Isabel's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isabel Cheadle Stockport CHD/13/8.

1875 Dec qtr - dau Isabel born at Stockport RD: Hooley Isobel Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1878 - dau Barbara's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Barbara Cheadle Stockport CHD/14/44.

1878 Dec qtr - dau Barbara born at Stockport RD: Hooley Barbara Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1881 - son Henry's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Henry Cheadle Stockport CHD/15/58.

1881 Mar qtr - son Henry born at Stockport RD: Hooley Henry Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f51 Smithy Green Cheadle
William Hooley Head M 38 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 31 Wales Flint
Henry Hooley Son 2mos Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alice Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1884 - son Thomas's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas Cheadle Stockport CHD/17/11.

1884 Sep qtr - son Thomas born at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 8a 94 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f47r Cheadle 6 Chadwick Street
William Hooley Head M 48 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliz. Hooley Wife M 41 Flint Flintshire
Alice Hooley Dau S 18 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 15 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Henry Hooley Son S 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f18 Cheadle 119 Hulme Hall Road
William Hooley Head M 59 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 50 Wales North Flint
Harry Hooley Son S 20 Domestic Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 16 Blacksmith apprentice Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 25 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 22 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 19 Ches Cheadle Hulme


Elizabeth Lloyd

1849 - born at Flint, Wales - see 1871 census below.

1866-70 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William LLOYD Elizabeth Cheadle Hulme, All Saints Stockport
ST66/1/5.

1869 Sep qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley William Stockport 8a 43 (GRO).

1869 18 Sep - Cheshire Observer - MARRIAGES On the 14th inst., at All Saint's, Cheadle Hulme, by the Rev. J. H. D.
Cochrane, M.A., Mr William Hooley of Hulme Hall, Cheshire, to Elizabeth Lloyd, grand-daughter of Mr.
Thomas Lloyd, timber merchant, Northop, Flintshire. (Eldest daughter of Thomas Lloyd in the Cheshire
Chronicle 25 Sep 1869)

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f129 Cheadle Bulkeley Smithy Green Cottage
William Hooley Head M 28 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 22 Wife Flint Wales
Solomon Thompson Boarder U 40 Farm Servant Ches Fulshaw

1872 - dau Alice's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Alice Cheadle Stockport CHD/11/79.

1872 Dec qtr - dau Alice born at Stockport RD: Hooley Alice Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).

1875 - dau Isabel's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isabel Cheadle Stockport CHD/13/8.

1875 Dec qtr - dau Isabel born at Stockport RD: Hooley Isobel Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1878 - dau Barbara's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Barbara Cheadle Stockport CHD/14/44.

1878 Dec qtr - dau Barbara born at Stockport RD: Hooley Barbara Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1881 - son Henry's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Henry Cheadle Stockport CHD/15/58.

1881 Mar qtr - son Henry born at Stockport RD: Hooley Henry Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f51 Smithy Green Cheadle
William Hooley Head M 38 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 31 Wales Flint
Henry Hooley Son 2mos Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alice Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1884 - son Thomas's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas Cheadle Stockport CHD/17/11.

1884 Sep qtr - son Thomas born at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 8a 94 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f47r Cheadle 6 Chadwick Street
William Hooley Head M 48 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliz. Hooley Wife M 41 Flint Flintshire
Alice Hooley Dau S 18 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 15 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Henry Hooley Son S 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f18 Cheadle 119 Hulme Hall Road
William Hooley Head M 59 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 50 Wales North Flint
Harry Hooley Son S 20 Domestic Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 16 Blacksmith apprentice Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 25 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 22 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 19 Ches Cheadle Hulm


263. Alice Hooley

1872 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Alice Cheadle Stockport CHD/11/79.

1872 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Alice Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f51 Smithy Green Cheadle
William Hooley Head M 38 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 31 Wales Flint
Henry Hooley Son 2mos Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alice Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f47r Cheadle 6 Chadwick Street
William Hooley Head M 48 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliz. Hooley Wife M 41 Flint Flintshire
Alice Hooley Dau S 18 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 15 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Henry Hooley Son S 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme


264. Isabel Hooley

1875 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isabel Cheadle Stockport CHD/13/8.

1875 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Isobel Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f51 Smithy Green Cheadle
William Hooley Head M 38 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 31 Wales Flint
Henry Hooley Son 2mos Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alice Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f47r Cheadle 6 Chadwick Street
William Hooley Head M 48 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliz. Hooley Wife M 41 Flint Flintshire
Alice Hooley Dau S 18 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 15 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Henry Hooley Son S 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f18 Cheadle 119 Hulme Hall Road
William Hooley Head M 59 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 50 Wales North Flint
Harry Hooley Son S 20 Domestic Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 16 Blacksmith apprentice Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 25 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 22 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 19 Ches Cheadle Hulme


265. Barbara Hooley

1878 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Barbara Cheadle Stockport CHD/14/44.

1878 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Barbara Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f51 Smithy Green Cheadle
William Hooley Head M 38 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 31 Wales Flint
Henry Hooley Son 2mos Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alice Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f47r Cheadle 6 Chadwick Street
William Hooley Head M 48 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliz. Hooley Wife M 41 Flint Flintshire
Alice Hooley Dau S 18 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 15 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Henry Hooley Son S 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f18 Cheadle 119 Hulme Hall Road
William Hooley Head M 59 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 50 Wales North Flint
Harry Hooley Son S 20 Domestic Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 16 Blacksmith apprentice Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 25 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 22 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 19 Ches Cheadle Hulme


266. Henry Hooley

1881 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Henry Cheadle Stockport CHD/15/58.

1881 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Henry Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f51 Smithy Green Cheadle
William Hooley Head M 38 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 31 Wales Flint
Henry Hooley Son 2mos Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alice Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f47r Cheadle 6 Chadwick Street
William Hooley Head M 48 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliz. Hooley Wife M 41 Flint Flintshire
Alice Hooley Dau S 18 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 15 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Henry Hooley Son S 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f18 Cheadle 119 Hulme Hall Road
William Hooley Head M 59 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 50 Wales North Flint
Harry Hooley Son S 20 Domestic Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 16 Blacksmith apprentice Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 25 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 22 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 19 Ches Cheadle Hulme


267. Agnes Hooley

1882 Sep qtr - ?born at Chorlton RD: Hooley Agnes Chorlton 8c 854 (GRO).
note - this is the only GRO entry for an Agnes Hooley from 1881 to 1885.
1891 census
RG 12/2806 f47r Cheadle 6 Chadwick Street
William Hooley Head M 48 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliz. Hooley Wife M 41 Flint Flintshire
Alice Hooley Dau S 18 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 15 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Henry Hooley Son S 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f18 Cheadle 119 Hulme Hall Road
William Hooley Head M 59 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 50 Wales North Flint
Harry Hooley Son S 20 Domestic Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 16 Blacksmith apprentice Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 25 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 22 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 19 Ches Cheadle Hulme


268. Thomas Hooley

1884 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Thomas Cheadle Stockport CHD/17/11.

1884 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Thomas Stockport 8a 94 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f47r Cheadle 6 Chadwick Street
William Hooley Head M 48 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliz. Hooley Wife M 41 Flint Flintshire
Alice Hooley Dau S 18 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 15 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Henry Hooley Son S 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f18 Cheadle 119 Hulme Hall Road
William Hooley Head M 59 General Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 50 Wales North Flint
Harry Hooley Son S 20 Domestic Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Hooley Son S 16 Blacksmith apprentice Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isabel Hooley Dau S 25 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Barbara Hooley Dau S 22 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Agnes Hooley Dau S 19 Ches Cheadle Hulme


171. Betsy Hooley

1840-45 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Betsey Cheadle Stockport CHD/3/3.

1844 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Betsey Stockport 19 222 (GRO).

1845 12 Jan - baptised at St Mary's church Cheadle: Betsy d. of John & Ann HOOLEY Cheadle
Hulme Farmer.

1851 census
HO 107/2157 f530 Cheadle Moseley Hulme Hall
John Hooley Head M 39 Farmer of 89 acres empl 2 Labs Lancs Heaton
Ann Hooley Wife M 32 Farmer's Wife Ches Peover
Thomas Hooley Son 11 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son 9 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Betsy Hooley Dau 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Sarah Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Dau 4mos Ches Cheadle Moseley
Martha Hooley Niece 15 Silk Weaver by Hand Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Groule Serv U 24 House Servant Ireland Clunfiens?
John Leigh Serv U 22 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
Isaac Leigh Serv U 20 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
John Swindells Lodger 38 Ag Lab Ches Bramall

1861 census
RG 92572 f108 Cheadle Mosely Hulme Hall
John Hooley Head M 48 Farmer 60 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Wife M 43 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Moseley
Thomas Hooley Son U 21 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son U 19 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
Betsy Hooley Dau 16 Farmer's Dau Ches Cheadle Moseley
Louisa Hooley Dau 7 Ches Cheadle Moseley
John Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Martha Powell Servt U 14 Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
Edward Thomason Servt U 16 Carter Ches Cheadle Moseley

1861-65 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Betsey BAILEY John Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/11/21.

1862 Sep qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Betsey Stockport 8a 11 (GRO).


John Bailey

1861-65 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Betsey BAILEY John Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/11/21.

1862 Sep qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Betsey Stockport 8a 11 (GRO).


269. Thomas Bailey

1864 - born at Cheadle Hulme - see 1851 census below.

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f46 Turves Lane Cheadle
James Bear Heap Head M 30 Traveller & farmer of 70 acres employs 4 Labs
Lancs Chorley
Louisa Heap Wife M 25 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Hulme
John Hooley F-in-L M 70 Farm Servant Indoor Lancs Heaton Mersey
Ann Hooley M-in-L M 65 Farm Servant's Wife Staffs Newcastle
Betsy Hooley Niece U 12 General Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
John Hooley B-in-L W 21 Farm Serv Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Bailey Nephew U 17 Farm Serv Ches Cheadle Hulme


172. Sarah Hooley

1846-50 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Sarah Cheadle Stockport CHD/4/39.

1849 Jun qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Sarah Stockport 19 285 (GRO).

1847 28 Nov - baptised at St Mary's church Cheadle: Sarah d. of John & Ann HOOLEY Cheadle
Hulme Farmer.

1851 census
HO 107/2157 f530 Cheadle Moseley Hulme Hall
John Hooley Head M 39 Farmer of 89 acres empl 2 Labs Lancs Heaton
Ann Hooley Wife M 32 Farmer's Wife Ches Peover
Thomas Hooley Son 11 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son 9 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Betsy Hooley Dau 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Sarah Hooley Dau 3 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Dau 4mos Ches Cheadle Moseley
Martha Hooley Niece 15 Silk Weaver by Hand Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Groule Serv U 24 House Servant Ireland Clunfiens?
John Leigh Serv U 22 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
Isaac Leigh Serv U 20 Farm Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
John Swindells Lodger 38 Ag Lab Ches Bramall

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f107r Cheadle Mosely Birch House
Isaac Storey Head M 50 Coppersmith Brass founder (+w, 3 c) Lancs Hulme
Eliza Storey Wife M 52 (+ 1 servt) Lancs Salford
Sarah Hooley Servt 13 House Servt. Ches Cheadle Moseley

1867 - dau Betsey's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Betsey Cheadle Stockport CHD/9/93.

1867 Dec qtr - dau Betsey born at Stockport RD: Hooley Betsey Stockport 8a 74 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f134r Cheadle Moseley Turves Farm
John Hooley Head M 60 Farmer of 50 Statute acres Lancs Heaton Norris
Ann Hooley Wife M 53 employing 3 labourers Ches Lower Peover
Sarah Hooley Dau U 22 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Louisa Hooley Dau U 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
John Hooley Son 12 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Betsy Hooley G-dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Robert Kitchen Servt U 20 Farm Servant indoors Ches Cheadle Hulme
James Rhodes Boarder U 20 Carter Ches Handforth


270. Betsey Hooley

Note : in the absence of other evidence this child has been provisionally allocated to Sarah Hooley.

1867 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Betsey Cheadle Stockport CHD/9/93.

1867 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Betsey Stockport 8a 74 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f134r Cheadle Moseley Turves Farm
John Hooley Head M 60 Farmer of 50 Statute acres Lancs Heaton Norris
Ann Hooley Wife M 53 employing 3 labourers Ches Lower Peover
Sarah Hooley Dau U 22 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Louisa Hooley Dau U 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
John Hooley Son 12 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Betsy Hooley G-dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Robert Kitchen Servt U 20 Farm Servant indoors Ches Cheadle Hulme
James Rhodes Boarder U 20 Carter Ches Handforth


175. John Hooley

1859 - birth entries from ChesBMD: 1. HOOLEY John Cheadle Stockport CHD/7/30
2. HOOLEY John Cheadle Stockport CHD/7/38

1859 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: 1. Hooley John Stockport 8a 80 (GRO).
1859 Jun qtr - born at Stockport RD: 2. Hooley John Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).
Note - see also John Hooley born 1859 ref 230.

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f108 Cheadle Mosely Hulme Hall
John Hooley Head M 48 Farmer 60 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Wife M 43 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Moseley
Thomas Hooley Son U 21 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son U 19 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
Betsy Hooley Dau 16 Farmer's Dau Ches Cheadle Moseley
Louisa Hooley Dau 7 Ches Cheadle Moseley
John Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Martha Powell Servt U 14 Servant Ches Cheadle Moseley
Edward Thomason Servt U 16 Carter Ches Cheadle Moseley

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f134r Cheadle Moseley Turves Farm
John Hooley Head M 60 Farmer of 50 Statute acres Lancs Heaton Norris
Ann Hooley Wife M 53 employing 3 labourers Ches Lower Peover
Sarah Hooley Dau U 22 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Louisa Hooley Dau U 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
John Hooley Son 12 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Betsy Hooley G-dau 3 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Robert Kitchen Servt U 20 Farm Servant indoors Ches Cheadle Hulme
James Rhodes Boarder U 20 Carter Ches Handforth

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f46 Turves Lane Cheadle
James Bear Heap Head M 30 Traveller & farmer of 70 acres employs 4 Labs
Lancs Chorley
Louisa Heap Wife M 25 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Hulme
John Hooley F-in-L M 70 Farm Servant Indoor Lancs Heaton Mersey
Ann Hooley M-in-L M 65 Farm Servant's Wife Staffs Newcastle
Betsy Hooley Niece U 12 General Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
John Hooley B-in-L W 21 Farm Serv Ches Cheadle Hulme
Thomas Bailey Nephew U 17 Farm Serv Ches Cheadle Hulme

1881-85 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY John WILLIAMSON Hannah Cheadle, St
Mary Stockport ST65/15/440.

1885 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley John Stockport 8a 121 (Spouse ref is 111) (GRO)

1885 - dau Annie's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Annie Cheadle Stockport CHD/17/69.

1885 Dec qtr - dau Annie born at Stockport RD: Hooley Annie Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1887 - dau Rose's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Rose Cheadle Stockport CHD/18/33.

1887 Sep qtr - dau Rose born at Stockport RD: Hooley Rose Stockport 8a 95 (GRO).

1889 - son Alfred's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Alfred CheadleStockport CHD/19/1.

1889 Mar qtr - son Alfred born at Stockport RD: Hooley Alfred Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f209r Cheadle 12 Brook Street
John Hooley Head M 31 Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 29 Bridgewater Som.
Annie Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Rose Hooley Dau 3 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alfred Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1891 - son Arthur Thomas's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Arthur Thomas Cheadle
Stockport CHD/20/18.

1891 Sep qtr - son Arthur Thomas born at Stockport RD : Hooley Arthur Thomas Stockport 8a 99
(GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3300 f95r Cheadle 22 Chapel Street
John Hooley Head M 41 Main Sewer Drain Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 39 Laundress Wash Somerset Bridgewater
Alfred Hooley Son 12 News Boy Ches Cheadle Hulme
Arthur Hooley Son 9 Ches Cheadle


Hannah Williamson

1862 - born at Bridgewater Somerset - see 1891 census below.

1881-85 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY John WILLIAMSON Hannah Cheadle, St
Mary Stockport ST65/15/440.

1885 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley John Stockport 8a 121 (Spouse ref is 111) (GRO)

1885 - dau Annie's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Annie Cheadle Stockport CHD/17/69.

1885 Dec qtr - dau Annie born at Stockport RD: Hooley Annie Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1887 - dau Rose's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Rose Cheadle Stockport CHD/18/33.

1887 Sep qtr - dau Rose born at Stockport RD: Hooley Rose Stockport 8a 95 (GRO).

1889 - son Alfred's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Alfred CheadleStockport CHD/19/1.

1889 Mar qtr - son Alfred born at Stockport RD: Hooley Alfred Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f209r Cheadle 12 Brook Street
John Hooley Head M 31 Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 29 Bridgewater Som.
Annie Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Rose Hooley Dau 3 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alfred Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1891 - son Arthur Thomas's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Arthur Thomas Cheadle
Stockport CHD/20/18.

1891 Sep qtr - son Arthur Thomas born at Stockport RD : Hooley Arthur Thomas Stockport 8a 99
(GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3300 f95r Cheadle 22 Chapel Street
John Hooley Head M 41 Main Sewer Drain Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 39 Laundress Wash Somerset Bridgewater
Alfred Hooley Son 12 News Boy Ches Cheadle Hulme
Arthur Hooley Son 9 Ches Cheadle


271. Annie Hooley

1885 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Annie Cheadle Stockport CHD/17/69.

1885 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Annie Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f209r Cheadle 12 Brook Street
John Hooley Head M 31 Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 29 Bridgewater Som.
Annie Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Rose Hooley Dau 3 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alfred Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3669 f73 Didsbury Burnage Lane
Edmund March Head M 29 Corn Traveller (+wife) Ches Cheadle
Annie Hooley Serv S 15 General Domestic Ches Cheadle Hulme


272. Rose Hooley

1887 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Rose Cheadle Stockport CHD/18/33.

1887 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Rose Stockport 8a 95 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f209r Cheadle 12 Brook Street
John Hooley Head M 31 Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 29 Bridgewater Som.
Annie Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Rose Hooley Dau 3 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alfred Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme


273. Alfred Drake Hooley

1889 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Alfred CheadleStockport CHD/19/1.

1889 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Alfred Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1889 05 Feb - born - see baptism entry below.

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f209r Cheadle 12 Brook Street
John Hooley Head M 31 Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 29 Bridgewater Som.
Annie Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Rose Hooley Dau 3 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Alfred Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme

1898 29 May - baptised at St Mary's church Cheadle: Alfred Drake s.of John & Hannah HOOLEY 26
Chapel St.Cheadle Labourer. Born Feb 5th 1889.

1901 census
RG 13/3300 f95r Cheadle 22 Chapel Street
John Hooley Head M 41 Main Sewer Drain Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 39 Laundress Wash Somerset Bridgewater
Alfred Hooley Son 12 News Boy Ches Cheadle Hulme
Arthur Hooley Son 9 Ches Cheadle


274. Arthur Thomas Hooley

1891 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Arthur Thomas Cheadle Stockport CHD/20/18.

1891 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD : Hooley Arthur Thomas Stockport 8a 99 (GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3300 f95r Cheadle 22 Chapel Street
John Hooley Head M 41 Main Sewer Drain Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Wife M 39 Laundress Wash Somerset Bridgewater
Alfred Hooley Son 12 News Boy Ches Cheadle Hulme
Arthur Hooley Son 9 Ches Cheadle


176. Daniel Hooley

1840-45 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Daniel Cheadle Stockport CHD/3/10.

1845 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Daniel Stockport 19 243 (GRO).

1851 census
HO 107/2157 f526r Cheadle Bulkley Gill Bent
Samuel Hooley Head M 35 Farmer & Hay Cutter Lancs Heaton Norris
Mary Hooley Wife M 32 Silk Weaver by Hand Chester Woodford
Daniel Hooley Son 6 None Ches Cheadle Bulkeley
Ann Hooley Dau 4 None Ches Cheadle Bulkeley
John Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Bulkeley
Mary Wood Serv 13 House Servant Ches Cheadle Bulkeley

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f105r Cheadle Bulkley Gill Bent
Samuel Hooley Head M 46 Farmer 6 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Hooley Wife M 44 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son U 26 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Dau 14 Farmer's dau Ches Cheadle Moseley
Samuel Hooley Son 9 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Isaac Hooley Son 6mos Ches Cheadle Moseley
Abraham Hooley Son 6mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1866-70 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Daniel BARBER Ann Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/12/294.

1868 Mar qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Daniel Stockport 8a 14 (GRO).

1869 - dau Mary Hannah's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary Hannah Cheadle
Stockport CHD/10/43.

1869 Mar qtr - dau Mary Hannah born at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Hannah Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).

1870 - son William's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William Cheadle Stockport
CHD/10/97.

1870 Dec qtr - son William born at Stockport RD: Hooley William Stockport 8a 79 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f131Cheadle Bulkeley Farm House
Mary Hooley Head W 52 Farmer of 14 acres Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son M 25 Haycutter Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley D-in-Law M 25 Late Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son U 19 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isaac Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary H. Hooley G-dau 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley G-son 6mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1872 - dau Amelia's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Amelia Cheadle Stockport
CHD/11/78

1872 Dec qtr - dau Amelia born at Stockport RD: Hooley Amelia Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).

1873 - son William's death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William 3 Cheadle Stockport
CHD/8/32.

1873 Sep qtr - son Samuel born at Stockport RD: Hooley Samuel vol 8a page 89 (FreeBMD).

1873 Dec qtr - son William died at Stockport RD: Hooley William 3 Stockport 8a 60 (GRO).

1874 - son Samuel's ChesBMD death entry: HOOLEY Samuel 0 Cheadle

1875 - son Albert's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Albert Cheadle Stockport CHD/12/72.

1875 Mar qtr - son Albert born at Stockport RD: Hooley Albert Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1877 - dau Janet's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Janet Cheadle Stockport CHD/13/68.

1877 Mar qtr - dau Janet born at Stockport RD: Hooley Janet Stockport 8a 106 (GRO).

1878 - son Daniel's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Daniel Cheadle Stockport
CHD/14/49.

1878 Dec qtr - son Daniel born at Stockport RD: Hooley Daniel Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

Electoral Register entries:
Period Ref no. Name Place of Nature of Street, Lane or name
abode qualification of Property or tenant

1880 5023 Hooley Daniel Gill bent, Cheadle Hulme house & land Cheadle heath

1880 5024 Hooley Daniel Gill bent, Cheadle Hulme house & land Turves lane

1881 5204 Hooley Daniel Gill bent, Cheadle Hulme house & land Gill bent

1881 - son Mark's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mark Cheadle Stockport CHD/15/54.

1881 Mar qtr - son Mark born at Stockport RD: Hooley Mark Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f68r Longsight Lane Cheadle
Daniel Hooley Head M 36 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle
Ann Hooley Wife M 35 Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Mary H. Hooley Dau 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Amelia Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Albert Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Janet Hooley Dau 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mark Hooley Son 2 mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

Electoral Register entries:
Period Ref no. Name Place of Nature of Street, Lane or name
abode qualification of Property or tenant

1882 5161 Hooley Daniel Gill bent, Cheadle Hulme house & land Cheadle heath

1883 - dau Miriam's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Miriam Cheadle Stockport
CHD/16/70.

1883 Dec qtr - dau Miriam born at Stockport RD: Hooley Miriam Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1886-90 - dau Mary Hannah's marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary H BRATT Joseph
Stockport Civil Marriage Stockport STR/38/136.

1889 Jun qtr - dau Mary Hannah married at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Hannah Stockport 8a 130 (GRO).

1890 - son Oswald's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Oswald Cheadle Stockport
CHD/19/61

1890 Sep qtr - son Oswald born at Stockport RD: Hooley Oswald Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f48a Cheadle 2 Longsight Lane
Daniel Hooley Head M 45 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Wife M 44 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Amelia Hooley Dau S 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Janet Hooley Dau 14 Domestic Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mark Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son 10mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1893 - wife's death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Ann 47 Cheadle Stockport CHD/14/59.

1893 Jun qtr - wife died at Stockport RD: Hooley Ann 47 Stockport 8a 75 (GRO).

1896-99 - dau Amelia's marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Amelia BRATT Nathan
Stockport Civil Marriage Stockport STR/54/151.

1898 Dec qtr - dau Amelia married at Stockport RD: Hooley Amelia Stockport 8a 134 (GRO).

1901 census
RG/3301 f9 Cheadle 2 Longsight off Standley Rd
Daniel Hooley Head W 56 Hay Cutter Ag. Lab. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Albert Hooley Son S 26 Coachman & Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Jennet Hooley Dau S 24 House Keeper Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son S 22 Coal Dealer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau S 17 Servant - Dom Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son S 10 Ches Cheadle Hulme


Ann Barber

1846 - born at Handforth - see 1871 census below.

1866-70 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Daniel BARBER Ann Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/12/294.

1868 Mar qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Daniel Stockport 8a 14 (GRO).

1869 - dau Mary Hannah's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary Hannah Cheadle
Stockport CHD/10/43.

1869 Mar qtr - dau Mary Hannah born at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Hannah Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).

1870 - son William's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William Cheadle Stockport
CHD/10/97.

1870 Dec qtr - son William born at Stockport RD: Hooley William Stockport 8a 79 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f131Cheadle Bulkeley Farm House
Mary Hooley Head W 52 Farmer of 14 acres Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son M 25 Haycutter Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley D-in-Law M 25 Late Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son U 19 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isaac Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary H. Hooley G-dau 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley G-son 6mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1872 - dau Mary's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary Cheadle Stockport CHD/11/61,

1872 Jun qtr - dau Mary born at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Stockport 8a 89 (GRO).

1873 - son William's death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William 3 Cheadle Stockport
CHD/8/32.

1873 Sep qtr - son Samuel born at Stockport RD: Hooley Samuel vol 8a page 89 (FreeBMD).

1873 Dec qtr - son William died at Stockport RD: Hooley William 3 Stockport 8a 60 (GRO).

1874 - son Samuel's ChesBMD death entry: HOOLEY Samuel 0 Cheadle

1875 - son Albert's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Albert Cheadle Stockport CHD/12/72.

1875 Mar qtr - son Albert born at Stockport RD: Hooley Albert Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1877 - dau Janet's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Janet Cheadle Stockport CHD/13/68.

1877 Mar qtr - dau Janet born at Stockport RD: Hooley Janet Stockport 8a 106 (GRO).

1878 - son Daniel's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Daniel Cheadle Stockport
CHD/14/49.

1878 Dec qtr - son Daniel born at Stockport RD: Hooley Daniel Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

1881 - son Mark's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mark Cheadle Stockport CHD/15/54.

1881 Mar qtr - son Mark born at Stockport RD: Hooley Mark Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f68r Longsight Lane Cheadle
Daniel Hooley Head M 36 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle
Ann Hooley Wife M 35 Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Mary H. Hooley Dau 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Amelia Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Albert Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Janet Hooley Dau 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mark Hooley Son 2 mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1883 - dau Miriam's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Miriam Cheadle Stockport
CHD/16/70.

1883 Dec qtr - dau Miriam born at Stockport RD: Hooley Miriam Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1886-90 - dau Mary Hannah's marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary H BRATT Joseph
Stockport Civil Marriage Stockport STR/38/136.

1889 Jun qtr - dau Mary Hannah married at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Hannah Stockport 8a 130 (GRO).

1890 - son Oswald's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Oswald Cheadle Stockport
CHD/19/61

1890 Sep qtr - son Oswald born at Stockport RD: Hooley Oswald Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f48a Cheadle 2 Longsight Lane
Daniel Hooley Head M 45 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Wife M 44 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Amelia Hooley Dau S 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Janet Hooley Dau 14 Domestic Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mark Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son 10mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1893 - death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Ann 47 Cheadle Stockport CHD/14/59.

1893 Jun qtr - died at Stockport RD: Hooley Ann 47 Stockport 8a 75 (GRO).


275. Mary Hannah Hooley

1869 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary Hannah Cheadle Stockport CHD/10/43.

1869 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Hannah Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f131Cheadle Bulkeley Farm House
Mary Hooley Head W 52 Farmer of 14 acres Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son M 25 Haycutter Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley D-in-Law M 25 Late Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son U 19 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isaac Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary H. Hooley G-dau 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley G-son 6mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f68r Longsight Lane Cheadle
Daniel Hooley Head M 36 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle
Ann Hooley Wife M 35 Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Mary H. Hooley Dau 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Amelia Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Albert Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Janet Hooley Dau 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mark Hooley Son 2 mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1886-90 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mary H BRATT Joseph Stockport Civil
Marriage Stockport STR/38/136.

1889 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Mary Hannah Stockport 8a 130 (GRO).

1901 - living at Cheadle with husband and 6 children.


276. William Hooley

1870 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William Cheadle Stockport CHD/10/97.

1870 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley William Stockport 8a 79 (GRO).

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f131Cheadle Bulkeley Farm House
Mary Hooley Head W 52 Farmer of 14 acres Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son M 25 Haycutter Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley D-in-Law M 25 Late Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son U 19 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isaac Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary H. Hooley G-dau 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley G-son 6mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1873 - death entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William 3 Cheadle Stockport CHD/8/32.

1873 Dec qtr - died at Stockport RD: Hooley William 3 Stockport 8a 60 (GRO).


277. Amelia Hooley

1872 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Amelia Cheadle Stockport CHD/11/78

1872 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Amelia Stockport 8a 88 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f68r Longsight Lane Cheadle
Daniel Hooley Head M 36 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle
Ann Hooley Wife M 35 Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Mary H. Hooley Dau 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Amelia Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Albert Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Janet Hooley Dau 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mark Hooley Son 2 mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f48a Cheadle 2 Longsight Lane
Daniel Hooley Head M 45 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Wife M 44 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Amelia Hooley Dau S 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Janet Hooley Dau 14 Domestic Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mark Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son 10mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1896-99 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Amelia BRATT Nathan Stockport Civil
Marriage Stockport STR/54/151.

1898 Dec qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Amelia Stockport 8a 134 (GRO).


278. Samuel Hooley

1873 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Samuel vol 8a page 89 (FreeBMD).

1874 - ChesBMD death entry: HOOLEY Samuel 0 Cheadle


279. Albert Hooley

1875 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Albert Cheadle Stockport CHD/12/72.

1875 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Albert Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f68r Longsight Lane Cheadle
Daniel Hooley Head M 36 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle
Ann Hooley Wife M 35 Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Mary H. Hooley Dau 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Amelia Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Albert Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Janet Hooley Dau 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mark Hooley Son 2 mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1891 census
RG 12/2800 f126 Cheadle 73 George Street
William H. Gradwell Head M 46 Butcher (+w, 2 sons) Ches Stockport
Albert Hooley App S 16 Butcher's Apprentice Ches Cheadle

1901 census
RG/3301 f9 Cheadle 2 Longsight off Standley Rd
Daniel Hooley Head W 56 Hay Cutter Ag. Lab. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Albert Hooley Son S 26 Coachman & Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Jennet Hooley Dau S 24 House Keeper Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son S 22 Coal Dealer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau S 17 Servant - Dom Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son S 10 Ches Cheadle Hulme


280. Janet Hooley

1877 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Janet Cheadle Stockport CHD/13/68.

1877 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Janet Stockport 8a 106 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f68r Longsight Lane Cheadle
Daniel Hooley Head M 36 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle
Ann Hooley Wife M 35 Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Mary H. Hooley Dau 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Amelia Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Albert Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Janet Hooley Dau 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mark Hooley Son 2 mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f48a Cheadle 2 Longsight Lane
Daniel Hooley Head M 45 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Wife M 44 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Amelia Hooley Dau S 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Janet Hooley Dau 14 Domestic Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mark Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son 10mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG/3301 f9 Cheadle 2 Longsight off Standley Rd
Daniel Hooley Head W 56 Hay Cutter Ag. Lab. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Albert Hooley Son S 26 Coachman & Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Jennet Hooley Dau S 24 House Keeper Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son S 22 Coal Dealer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau S 17 Servant - Dom Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son S 10 Ches Cheadle Hulme


281. Daniel Hooley

1878 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Daniel Cheadle Stockport CHD/14/49.

1878 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Daniel Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f68r Longsight Lane Cheadle
Daniel Hooley Head M 36 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle
Ann Hooley Wife M 35 Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Mary H. Hooley Dau 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Amelia Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Albert Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Janet Hooley Dau 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mark Hooley Son 2 mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f48a Cheadle 2 Longsight Lane
Daniel Hooley Head M 45 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Wife M 44 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Amelia Hooley Dau S 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Janet Hooley Dau 14 Domestic Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mark Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son 10mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG/3301 f9 Cheadle 2 Longsight off Standley Rd
Daniel Hooley Head W 56 Hay Cutter Ag. Lab. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Albert Hooley Son S 26 Coachman & Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Jennet Hooley Dau S 24 House Keeper Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son S 22 Coal Dealer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau S 17 Servant - Dom Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son S 10 Ches Cheadle Hulme


282. Mark Hooley

1881 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Mark Cheadle Stockport CHD/15/54.

1881 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Mark Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f68r Longsight Lane Cheadle
Daniel Hooley Head M 36 Farm Labourer Ches Cheadle
Ann Hooley Wife M 35 Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Mary H. Hooley Dau 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Amelia Hooley Dau 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Albert Hooley Son 6 Scholar Ches Cheadle Moseley
Janet Hooley Dau 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son 2 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mark Hooley Son 2 mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f48a Cheadle 2 Longsight Lane
Daniel Hooley Head M 45 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Wife M 44 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Amelia Hooley Dau S 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Janet Hooley Dau 14 Domestic Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mark Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son 10mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3300 f108 Cheadle Lady Bridge Road
David Leather Head M 36 Farmer (+w, 1 ch) Ches Cheadle
Mark Hooley Serv S 19 Carter on Farm Ches Cheadle


283. Miriam Hooley

1883 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Miriam Cheadle Stockport CHD/16/70.

1883 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Miriam Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f48a Cheadle 2 Longsight Lane
Daniel Hooley Head M 45 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Wife M 44 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Amelia Hooley Dau S 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Janet Hooley Dau 14 Domestic Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mark Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son 10mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG/3301 f9 Cheadle 2 Longsight off Standley Rd
Daniel Hooley Head W 56 Hay Cutter Ag. Lab. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Albert Hooley Son S 26 Coachman & Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Jennet Hooley Dau S 24 House Keeper Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son S 22 Coal Dealer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau S 17 Servant - Dom Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son S 10 Ches Cheadle Hulme


284. Oswald Hooley

1890 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Oswald Cheadle Stockport CHD/19/61

1890 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Oswald Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f48a Cheadle 2 Longsight Lane
Daniel Hooley Head M 45 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Wife M 44 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Amelia Hooley Dau S 18 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Janet Hooley Dau 14 Domestic Servant Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son 12 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mark Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son 10mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG/3301 f9 Cheadle 2 Longsight off Standley Rd
Daniel Hooley Head W 56 Hay Cutter Ag. Lab. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Albert Hooley Son S 26 Coachman & Gardener Ches Cheadle Hulme
Jennet Hooley Dau S 24 House Keeper Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son S 22 Coal Dealer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Miriam Hooley Dau S 17 Servant - Dom Ches Cheadle Hulme
Oswald Hooley Son S 10 Ches Cheadle Hulme


179. Samuel Hooley

1852 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Samuel Cheadle Stockport CHD/5/45.

1852 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Samuel Benjamin Stockport 8a 48 (GRO).

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f105r Cheadle Bulkley Gill Bent
Samuel Hooley Head M 46 Farmer 6 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Hooley Wife M 44 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son U 26 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Dau 14 Farmer's dau Ches Cheadle Moseley
Samuel Hooley Son 9 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Isaac Hooley Son 6mos Ches Cheadle Moseley
Abraham Hooley Son 6mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f131Cheadle Bulkeley Farm House
Mary Hooley Head W 52 Farmer of 14 acres Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son M 25 Haycutter Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley D-in-Law M 25 Late Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son U 19 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isaac Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary H. Hooley G-dau 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley G-son 6mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1875 - dau Hannah's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Hannah Cheadle

1875 Mar qtr - dau Hannah born at Stockport RD: Hooley Hannah Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

Electoral Register entries:
Period Ref no. Name Place of Nature of Street, Lane or name
abode qualification of Property or tenant

1878 4789 Hooley Samuel Gill bent, Cheadle Hulme house & land Gill bent

1879 4919 Hooley Samuel Gill bent, Cheadle Hulme house & land Gill bent

1878 - son William's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William Cheadle Stockport
CHD/14/22

1878 Jun qtr - son William born at Stockport RD: Hooley William Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f66 Grove Lane Cheadle
Samuel Hooley Head M 29 Farm Labourer Ches Bramhall
Mary Hooley Wife M 29 Ches Bramhall
Hanah Hooley Dau 6 Ches Bramhall
William Hooley Son 4 Ches Bramhall

1883 - dau Martha Ann's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Martha Ann Cheadle

1883 Sep qtr - dau Martha Ann born at Stockport RD: Hooley Martha Ann Stockport 8a 86 (GRO).

1883 18 Jun - dau Martha Ann born - see National School Admission Registers.

1885 - dau Charlotte's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Charlotte Cheadle

1885 Jun qtr - dau Charlotte born at Stockport RD: Hooley Charlotte 8a 95 (FreeBMD).

1885 04 May - dau Charlotte born - see National School Admission Registers below.

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f58 Cheadle Grove Lane
Samuel Hooley Head M 38 Agricultural Labourer Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 39 Silk Hand Loom Weaver Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 16 Domestic Servant Cheadle Hulme
Martha Ann Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Cheadle Hulme
Charlot Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f10 Cheadle 11 off Standley Road
Samuel Hooley Head M 47 Labourer on Farm Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 47 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 26 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley Son S 24 Agricultural Labourer Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Martha A. Hooley Dau S 17 Dressmaker Ches Cheadle Hulme
Charlotte Hooley Dau S 15 Ches Cheadle Hulme


Mary Barber

1852 - born at Bramhall - see 1881 census below.

1875 - dau Hannah's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Hannah Cheadle

1875 Mar qtr - dau Hannah born at Stockport RD: Hooley Hannah Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1878 - son William's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William Cheadle

1878 Jun qtr - son William born at Stockport RD: Hooley William Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f66 Grove Lane Cheadle
Samuel Hooley Head M 29 Farm Labourer Ches Bramhall
Mary Hooley Wife M 29 Ches Bramhall
Hanah Hooley Dau 6 Ches Bramhall
William Hooley Son 4 Ches Bramhall

1883 - dau Martha Ann's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Martha Ann Cheadle.

1883 18 Jun - dau Martha Ann born - see National School Admission Registers.

1883 Sep qtr - dau Martha Ann born at Stockport RD: Hooley Martha Ann Stockport 8a 86 (GRO).

1885 - dau Charlotte's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Charlotte Cheadle

1885 Jun qtr - dau Charlotte born at Stockport RD: Hooley Charlotte 8a 95 (FreeBMD).

1885 04 May - dau Charlotte born - see National School Admission Registers below

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f58 Cheadle Grove Lane
Samuel Hooley Head M 38 Agricultural Labourer Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 39 Silk Hand Loom Weaver Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 16 Domestic Servant Cheadle Hulme
Martha Ann Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Cheadle Hulme
Charlot Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f10 Cheadle 11 off Standley Road
Samuel Hooley Head M 47 Labourer on Farm Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 47 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 26 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley Son S 24 Agricultural Labourer Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Martha A. Hooley Dau S 17 Dressmaker Ches Cheadle Hulme
Charlotte Hooley Dau S 15 Ches Cheadle Hulme


285. Hannah Hooley

1875 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Hannah Cheadle Stockport CHD/12/72

1875 Mar qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Hannah Stockport 8a 91 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f66 Grove Lane Cheadle
Samuel Hooley Head M 29 Farm Labourer Ches Bramhall
Mary Hooley Wife M 29 Ches Bramhall
Hanah Hooley Dau 6 Ches Bramhall
William Hooley Son 4 Ches Bramhall

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f58 Cheadle Grove Lane
Samuel Hooley Head M 38 Agricultural Labourer Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 39 Silk Hand Loom Weaver Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 16 Domestic Servant Cheadle Hulme
Martha Ann Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Cheadle Hulme
Charlot Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f10 Cheadle 11 off Standley Road
Samuel Hooley Head M 47 Labourer on Farm Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 47 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 26 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley Son S 24 Agricultural Labourer Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Martha A. Hooley Dau S 17 Dressmaker Ches Cheadle Hulme
Charlotte Hooley Dau S 15 Ches Cheadle Hulme


286. William Hooley

1878 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY William Cheadle Stockport CHD/14/22

1878 Jun qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley William Stockport 8a 98 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f66 Grove Lane Cheadle
Samuel Hooley Head M 29 Farm Labourer Ches Bramhall
Mary Hooley Wife M 29 Ches Bramhall
Hanah Hooley Dau 6 Ches Bramhall
William Hooley Son 4 Ches Bramhall

1891 census - not found

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f10 Cheadle 11 off Standley Road
Samuel Hooley Head M 47 Labourer on Farm Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 47 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 26 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley Son S 24 Agricultural Labourer Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Martha A. Hooley Dau S 17 Dressmaker Ches Cheadle Hulme
Charlotte Hooley Dau S 15 Ches Cheadle Hulme


287. Martha Ann Hooley

1883 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Martha Ann Cheadle Stockport CHD/16/62.

1883 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Martha Ann Stockport 8a 86 (GRO).

1883 18 Jun - born - see National School Admission Registers entry below.

National School Admission Registers

Name Martha Ann Hooley
Birth year 1883 18 Jun
Admission year 11 May 1891
School name Bramhall Pownall Green County Primary School
Parent or guardian's name Samuel
Place Grove Lane Bramhall
Last School attended Cheadle Hulme

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f58 Cheadle Grove Lane
Samuel Hooley Head M 38 Agricultural Labourer Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 39 Silk Hand Loom Weaver Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 16 Domestic Servant Cheadle Hulme
Martha Ann Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Cheadle Hulme
Charlot Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f10 Cheadle 11 off Standley Road
Samuel Hooley Head M 47 Labourer on Farm Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 47 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 26 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley Son S 24 Agricultural Labourer Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Martha A. Hooley Dau S 17 Dressmaker Ches Cheadle Hulme
Charlotte Hooley Dau S 15 Ches Cheadle Hulme


288. Charlotte Hooley

1885 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Charlotte Cheadle.

1885 Jun qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Charlotte 8a 95 (FreeBMD).

1885 04 May - born - see National School Admission Registers below.

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f58 Cheadle Grove Lane
Samuel Hooley Head M 38 Agricultural Labourer Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 39 Silk Hand Loom Weaver Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 16 Domestic Servant Cheadle Hulme
Martha Ann Hooley Dau 7 Scholar Cheadle Hulme
Charlot Hooley Dau 5 Scholar Cheadle Hulme

National School Admission Registers

Name Charlotte Hooley
Birth year 1885 04 May
Admission year 11 May 1891
School name Bramhall Pownall Green County Primary School
Parent or guardian's name Samuel
Place Grove Lane Bramhall
Last School attended Cheadle Hulme

1901 census
RG 13/3301 f10 Cheadle 11 off Standley Road
Samuel Hooley Head M 47 Labourer on Farm Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary Hooley Wife M 47 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
Hannah Hooley Dau S 26 Silk Weaver Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley Son S 24 Agricultural Labourer Ag L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Martha A. Hooley Dau S 17 Dressmaker Ches Cheadle Hulme
Charlotte Hooley Dau S 15 Ches Cheadle Hulme


181. Isaac Hooley

1860 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isaac Cheadle Stockport CHD/7/77.

1860 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Isaac Stockport 8a 78 (GRO).

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f105r Cheadle Bulkley Gill Bent
Samuel Hooley Head M 46 Farmer 6 acres Ches Cheadle Moseley
Mary Hooley Wife M 44 Farmer's Wife Ches Cheadle Moseley
Daniel Hooley Son U 26 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
Ann Hooley Dau 14 Farmer's dau Ches Cheadle Moseley
Samuel Hooley Son 9 Farmer's Son Ches Cheadle Moseley
William Hooley Son 4 Ches Cheadle Moseley
Isaac Hooley Son 6mos Ches Cheadle Moseley
Abraham Hooley Son 6mos Ches Cheadle Moseley

1871 census
RG 10/3666 f131Cheadle Bulkeley Farm House
Mary Hooley Head W 52 Farmer of 14 acres Ches Cheadle Hulme
Daniel Hooley Son M 25 Haycutter Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley D-in-Law M 25 Late Silk Weaver Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son U 19 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle Hulme
Isaac Hooley Son 10 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
Mary H. Hooley G-dau 2 Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley G-son 6mos Ches Cheadle Hulme

1881 census
RG 11/3485 f52r Gill Bent Farm Cheadle
Mary Hooley Head W 55 Farmer of 6 acres Ches Woodford
Isaac Hooley Son U 20 Farmers Son Ches Cheadle Hulme

1891 census
RG 12/2806 f49 Cheadle 21 Stanley Road
Mary Hooley Head W 66 Ches Cheadle
Isaac Hooley Son S 30 Agricultural Labourer Ches Cheadle

1891-95 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isaac BROWN Elizabeth Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/17/117.

1891 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Isaac Stockport 8a 14 (GRO).

1892 - son John's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY John Cheadle Stockport CHD/20/75.

1892 Dec qtr - son John born at Stockport RD: Hooley John Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1894 - son Isaac's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isaac Cheadle Stockport CHD/21/47.

1894 Jun qtr - son Isaac born at Stockport RD: Hooley Isaac Stockport 8a 103 (GRO).

1900 - son Stanley's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Stanley Cheadle Stockport
CHD/24/34.

1900 Sep qtr - son Stanley born at Stockport RD: Hooley Stanley Stockport 8a 107 (GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3302 f8r Handforth Wilmslow Road
Samuel Brown G-fath W 79 Gardener not Domestic Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Head M 40 Farm Labourer Ag. L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 39 Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son S 9 Ches Handforth
John Hooley Son S 8 Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Son S 6 Ches Handforth
Stanley Hooley Son S 9mos Ches Handforth


Elizabeth Brown

1862 - born at Handforth - see 1901 census below.

1891-95 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isaac BROWN Elizabeth Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/17/117.

1891 Jun qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Isaac Stockport 8a 14 (GRO).

1891-95 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isaac BROWN Elizabeth Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/17/117.

1892 - son John's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY John Cheadle Stockport CHD/20/75.

1892 Dec qtr - son John born at Stockport RD: Hooley John Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1894 - son Isaac's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isaac Cheadle Stockport CHD/21/47.

1894 Jun qtr - son Isaac born at Stockport RD: Hooley Isaac Stockport 8a 103 (GRO).

1900 - son Stanley's birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Stanley Cheadle Stockport
CHD/24/34.

1900 Sep qtr - son Stanley born at Stockport RD: Hooley Stanley Stockport 8a 107 (GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3302 f8r Handforth Wilmslow Road
Samuel Brown G-fath W 79 Gardener not Domestic Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Head M 40 Farm Labourer Ag. L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 39 Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son S 9 Ches Handforth
John Hooley Son S 8 Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Son S 6 Ches Handforth
Stanley Hooley Son S 9mos Ches Handforth


289. Samuel Hooley

1891 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Samuel Cheadle Stockport CHD/20/14.

1891 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Samuel Stockport 8a 97 (GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3302 f8r Handforth Wilmslow Road
Samuel Brown G-fath W 79 Gardener not Domestic Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Head M 40 Farm Labourer Ag. L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 39 Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son S 9 Ches Handforth
John Hooley Son S 8 Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Son S 6 Ches Handforth
Stanley Hooley Son S 9mos Ches Handforth


290. John Hooley

1892 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY John Cheadle Stockport CHD/20/75.

1892 Dec qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley John Stockport 8a 96 (GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3302 f8r Handforth Wilmslow Road
Samuel Brown G-fath W 79 Gardener not Domestic Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Head M 40 Farm Labourer Ag. L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 39 Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son S 9 Ches Handforth
John Hooley Son S 8 Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Son S 6 Ches Handforth
Stanley Hooley Son S 9mos Ches Handforth


291. Isaac Hooley

1894 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Isaac Cheadle Stockport CHD/21/47.

1894 qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Isaac Stockport 8a 103 (GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3302 f8r Handforth Wilmslow Road
Samuel Brown G-fath W 79 Gardener not Domestic Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Head M 40 Farm Labourer Ag. L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 39 Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son S 9 Ches Handforth
John Hooley Son S 8 Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Son S 6 Ches Handforth
Stanley Hooley Son S 9mos Ches Handforth


292. Stanley Hooley

1900 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Stanley Cheadle Stockport CHD/24/34.

1900 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Stanley Stockport 8a 107 (GRO).

1901 census
RG 13/3302 f8r Handforth Wilmslow Road
Samuel Brown G-fath W 79 Gardener not Domestic Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Head M 40 Farm Labourer Ag. L. Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Wife M 39 Ches Handforth
Samuel Hooley Son S 9 Ches Handforth
John Hooley Son S 8 Ches Handforth
Isaac Hooley Son S 6 Ches Handforth
Stanley Hooley Son S 9mos Ches Handforth


184. Ann Hooley

1851 - birth entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Ann Cheadle Stockport CHD/5/12.

1851 Sep qtr - born at Stockport RD: Hooley Ann Stockport 19 265 (GRO).

1851 21 Dec - baptised at St Mary's church Cheadle: Ann d. of Philip & Jane HOOLEY Adswood
Farmer.

1861 census
RG 9/2572 f66 Cheadle Moseley Fir Tree Farm
Philip Hooley Head M 39 Farmer 38 acres emp one man servant Cheadle Ches
Jane Hooley Wife M 35 Cheadle Ches
Ann Hooley Dau U 9 Scholar Cheadle Ches
Martha Hooley Dau U 7 Cheadle Ches
Elizabeth Hooley Dau U 5 Cheadle Ches
Eliza Hooley Dau U 2wks Cheadle Ches
Thomas Hooley Nephew U 17 Ag Lab Cheadle Ches

1871 census
RG 10/3653 f74r Bredbury Cruckily Wood Farm
Philip Hooley Head M 49 Farmer 52 acres employs 1 man Ches Cheadle Hulme
Jane Hooley Wife M 46 House duties Ches Cheadle Hulme
Ann Hooley Dau U 19 Dairy maid Ches Cheadle Hulme
Martha Hooley Dau 17 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Elizabeth Hooley Dau 16 Ches Cheadle Hulme
Eliza Hooley Dau 9 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
William Hooley Son 8 Scholar Ches Cheadle Hulme
John Hooley Son 5 Ches Bredbury
Henry Hooley Son 3 Ches Bredbury
James Fitzpatrick Serv U 20 Farm Servant Cork Ireland

1871-75 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Annie LOMAS Samuel Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/13/365

1872 Sep qtr - married at Stockport RD: Hooley Annie Stockport 8a 25 (GRO).

1874 - ?son Harold's birth entry from ChesBMD: LOMAS Harry Rainow Cheshire East
RAI/8/90.

1874 Jun qtr - ?son Harold born at Macclesfield RD: Lomas Harry Macclesfield 8a 125 (GRO).

1878 - son Walter's birth entry from ChesBMD: LOMAS Walter Wilmslow Cheshire East
WIL/21/17.

1878 Sep qtr - son Walter born at Altrincham RD: Lomas Walter 8a 172 (GRO).


1881 census
RG 11/3500 f32 Grove Street Bollin Fee
Annie Lomas Head M 29 Visiting Surgeon's Wife Ches Cheadle Hulme
Harold Lomas Son 7 Scholar Ches Wilmslow
Walter Lomas Son 5 Ches Wilmslow


Samuel Lomas

1849 - born at Disley - see 1881 census below.

1871-75 - marriage entry from ChesBMD: HOOLEY Annie LOMAS Samuel Cheadle, St Mary
Stockport ST65/13/365

1872 Sep qtr - married at Stockport RD: Lomas Samuel Stockport 8a 25 (GRO).

1874 - ?son Harold's birth entry from ChesBMD: LOMAS Harry Rainow Cheshire East
RAI/8/90.

1874 Jun qtr - ?son Harold born at Macclesfield RD: Lomas Harry Macclesfield 8a 125 (GRO).

1878 - son Walter's birth entry from ChesBMD: LOMAS Walter Wilmslow Cheshire East
WIL/21/17.

1878 Sep qtr - son Walter born at Altrincham RD: Lomas Walter 8a 172 (GRO).


1881 census
RG 11/3471 f3 3 Mersey St Heaton Norris
Samuel Lomas Head M 32 Vetrinary Surgeon Disley Ches
Eliza Hooley Wifes' sister U 19 Housekeeper Adswood Ches


293. Harold Lomas

1874 - ?birth entry from ChesBMD: LOMAS Harry Rainow Cheshire East RAI/8/90.

1874 Jun qtr - ?born at Macclesfield RD: Lomas Harry Macclesfield 8a 125 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3500 f32 Grove Street Bollin Fee
Annie Lomas Head M 29 Visiting Surgeon's Wife Ches Cheadle Hulme
Harold Lomas Son 7 Scholar Ches Wilmslow
Walter Lomas Son 5 Ches Wilmslow


294. Walter Lomas

1878 - birth entry from ChesBMD: LOMAS Walter Wilmslow Cheshire East WIL/21/17.

1878 Sep qtr - born at Altrincham RD: Lomas Walter 8a 172 (GRO).

1881 census
RG 11/3500 f32 Grove Street Bollin Fee
Annie Lomas Head M 29 Visiting Surgeon's Wife Ches Cheadle Hulme
Harold Lomas Son 7 Scholar Ches Wilmslow
Walter Lomas Son 5 Ches Wilmslow


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