Hulley Family History >> Family Trees >> AFRICA,South Africa > Richard Hulley

pFamily Trees
pCheshire
pDerbyshire
pLancashire
pNorfolk and Glamorgan
pWestmorland / Cumberland
pYorkshire
pLondon
pAmerica
pAustralia
pCanada
pSouth Africa

pGuest Book
pView or Sign

pContact Me
pSend Email
 
  


SouthAfrica01 - descendants of Richard Hulley born 1785 at Ecclesfield, South Yorkshire

Notes


99. Elizabeth Rachel Hulley

1856 04 Aug - born at Queenstown, Cape Colony.

1856 01 Sep - christened at Queenstown, Cape Colony.
Source: Methodist Parish Records. Item_No2, Film 1560874. Church Queenstown
Christenings 1854-1883. Remarks_. Transcriber Ellen Stanton. Minister

1874 22 Jan - married at Hopewell Farm, Umzimkulu, Cape Colony by Donald STRACHAN, JP.

1895 14 May - birth certificate of son Eric Cyril Hancock:
Entry #3
Father: James Ebenezer HANCOCK, English, 43, born St. John's River, Farmer
Mother: Elizabeth Rachel HULLEY, English, 38, born Queenstown, Housewife
Child: Eric Cyril HANCOCK
Born: 3/14/1895
Date of Marriage: 1/22/1874
Other Children: 7 sons, 1 daughter (living), 2 sons, 1 daughter (deceased)
Residence: Pleasant View
Witness: Alice MACPHERSON

1904 13 Feb - died at Pleasantview Farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Province.
buried at Pleasantview Farm Cemetery

2008 Apr - Note by John Powell: According to my information, Richard Brangan Hulley was
established at Shawbury by April 1850, later establishing another mission at
Tshubgwana before moving to Hopewell farm in 1864. I suggest that the recorder or
transcriber may have mistaken an unfamiliar place name such as Qumbu for
Queenstown. However, if there is any proof to shows that Elizabeth Rachel Hulley was
born at Queenstown, it would be very helpful to have. (See next Note by John Powell).

2012 02 Jan - Note by John Powell: You may have noticed that I have changed the place of birth from
Shawbury Mission to Queenstown. There is other compelling evidence to make me
doubt my original entry, viz. the Birth Certificate of her 12th child, Eric Cyril HANCOCK,
on which her birthplace is given as Queenstown (see below). Also, if she had
been born in Shawbury, it is unlikely that her parents would have taken her all the way
to Queenstown to be baptised at such a young age (4 weeks). My previous contribution
to her NOTES in this respect, on your website, can be considered redundant.


James Ebenezer Hancock

1852 14 Feb - born in a wagon, Upper Drift, Right bank of St John’s River, Pondoland.
Christened by Rev. W.H. GARNER.

2012 01 Jan - Note by John Powell: Lived at Woodsville farm, Swartberg, East Griqualand and
Mooiplaats (renamed Pleasantview) farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape
Colony / Province. The former property, as well as Charnwood farm near Franklin, East
Griqualand, were given to him by his father; he inherited Mooiplaats (Pleasantview)
from his uncle, Thomas Hancock.

1913 31 Jul - died at Pleasantview Farm, Sneezewood, (Upper) Umzimkulu District, Cape Province.
Buried at Pleasantview Farm, Sneezewood,


272. Mary Rachel Hancock

1876 07 Apr - born at Gowan Lea Farm, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1876 11 Jul - baptised at Cromwell Farm by the Rev. T. Kirkby.

2012 02 Jan - Note by John Powell: . On the Death Notice of Elizabeth Rachel Hancock née Hulley,
the birth date of Mary Rachel Hancock is given as 7 Apr 1875. She was baptised on 11
July 1876 at Cromwell farm by Rev. T Kirkby. More information may be required to
resolve this.

Known as (Aunt) Minnie. She helped her mother with the younger children and never
married. However, in terms of her father’s will, the farm could not be sold until all the
daughters were married and the SA Government was pressing farmers in the area to sell
to them for Native Trust Lands. Minnie went through a marriage ceremony with a Mr
Muir, who was paid for his trouble and was made to understand that immediately after the
ceremony, he was to leave and never return. The terms of the will having been satisfied,
the farm was sold to the Government.

1971 02 Mar - died at Benoni, Transvaal, Republic of South Africa.


273. Ernest Joseph Hancock

1877 02 Jan - born at Mooiplaats Farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1878 10 Jan - died at Mooiplaats Farm, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

- buried at Mooiplaats Farm cemetery, Upper Umzimkulu.


274. Annie Ellen Hancock

1878 18 May - born at Mooiplaats Farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony;

1879 02 Feb - died at Mooiplaats Farm, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

- buried at Mooiplaats Farm cemetery, Upper Umzimkulu.


275. Samuel Hancock

1880 20 Jan - born at Mooiplaats farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1880 18 Jul - died at Mooiplaats farm. Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

- buried at Mooiplaats Farm cemetery, Upper Umzimkulu.


276. William James Hancock

1881 21 Apr - born - Mooiplaats farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony;

- Married Edith Jeanette Susanna ROBINSON. 3 children.

1949 22 Jul - died at Pietermaritzburg, Natal. Death Notice signed by his son, James Vernon (‘Boy’)
Hancock.

buried at Mountain Rise Cemetery, Pietermaritzburg

Natal Archives, Pietermaritzburg: Deceased Estate 2312/59.

The Hancock Family Bible is kept by this family.


277. Alexander Robert Hancock

1882 26 Nov - born at Mount Frere, Cape Colony.

1883 03 Sep - baptised by the Revd. W. Davis.

1930 30 Aug - died at Benoni, Transvaal.

2012 02 Jan - Note by John Powell:
Probably born at Esek farm, Mount Frere, which belonged to his mother’s parents.
Baptised 3 Sep 1883 by Rev. W DAVIS.
Married Sarah DUFF. 2 children.
Orange Free State Archives, Bloemfontein: Deceased Estate MHG 1930/0/22832.


278. Percival Walter Hancock

1884 01 Dec - born at Mount Frere, Cape Colony.

1949 Dec - died at Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

2012 02 Jan - Note by John Powell:
Probably born at Esek farm, Mount Frere, which belonged to his mother’s parents.
Either unmarried or married Emily HLULASI. 1 child, died young (polio).


279. Herbert Ebenezer Hancock

1886 06 Sep - born at Singisi, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1949 03 Sep - died at Pietermaritzburg, Natal, buried Mountain Rise Cemetery, Pietermaritzburg.

2012 02 Jan - Note from John Powell: Probably born at Pleasantview farm.
Married Elizabeth Clark ROBINSON (sister of wife of Eric Cyril HANCOCK, also cousin of
wife of William James HANCOCK). 7 children.


280. George Kennedy Hancock

1889 04 Feb - born at Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1964 11 Jun - died at Harding, Natal.

2012 02 Jan - Note from John Powell:
Probably born at Pleasantview Farm.
Married Faith Vivian (‘Kitty’) GADSDEN. 4 children.
Natal Archives, Pietermaritzburg: Deceased Estate 1780/64. Spouse (d. 2 Apr 1963)
611/64.
Lived at Woodsville farm, Swartberg, East Griqualand until the early 1920s. Managed
Pleasantview Farm for the family until it was sold in the late 1930s. Later farmed at
Cliffvale Farm and Pecan Grove Farm, near Harding, Natal.


281. Lewis Harold Hancock

1891 02 Jul - born at Pleasantview Farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1917 17 Jun - died at Cromleigh Farm, Ixopo District, Natal.

2012 02 Jan - Note from John Powell:
Died unmarried.
While on military (WWI) leave he went to visit his aunt and uncle (Elizabeth McKenzie
Hackland née Hancock and John George Hackland) for whom he had previously worked
at Cromleigh farm (Cromwell No. 2). As he had been expected, his aunt and uncle
watched his approach on horseback; he galloped towards them and his horse put a hoof
in a hole and went over. Lewis was killed in the fall.
I’m not sure, but I think I remember seeing his grave at Union Bridge Church cemetery.
This church is situated on the banks of the Umzimkulu River, on the (old) Natal side of
the river, across from the village of Umzimkulu.
Natal Archives, Pietermaritzburg: Deceased Estate 1484/1917.


282. Thomas Gower Hancock

1892 25 Sep - born at Cromwell Farm, Umzimkulu (Ixopo) District, Colony of Natal.

1948 03 Apr - died at Germiston, Transvaal.

2012 02 Jan - Note from John Powell:
Married Margaret Helen Bryant PEARSE. 8 children.
Transvaal Archives, Pretoria: Deceased Estate 2319/48. Spouse (d. 10 Aug 1969), Cape
Archives, Cape Town: Deceased Estate 4497/69.


283. Eric Cyril Hancock

1895 14 Mar - born at Pleasantview farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1895 14 May - birth certificate of son Eric Cyril Hancock:
Entry #3
Father: James Ebenezer HANCOCK, English, 43, born St. John's River, Farmer
Mother: Elizabeth Rachel HULLEY, English, 38, born Queenstown, Housewife
Child: Eric Cyril HANCOCK
Born: 3/14/1895
Date of Marriage: 1/22/1874
Other Children: 7 sons, 1 daughter (living), 2 sons, 1 daughter (deceased)
Residence: Pleasant View
Witness: Alice MACPHERSON

1966 19 Sep - died at Pietermaritzburg, Natal, Republic of South Africa.

2012 02 Jan - Note from John Powell:
Microfilm #1926385, Birth Certificates 1895, Item 9: Umzimkulu, Entry #3. Father:
James Ebenezer HANCOCK, English, 43, born St. John's River, Farmer; Mother:
Elizabeth Rachel HULLEY, English, 38, born Queenstown, Housewife; Child: Eric Cyril
HANCOCK; Born: 3/14/1895. Date of Marriage: 1/22/1874. Other Children: 7 sons, 1
daughter (living), 2 sons, 1 daughter (deceased). Residence: Pleasant View. Witness:
Alice MACPHERSON
Married Irene Angelique ROBINSON. 5 children.
Saw service in France in WWI.
Buried Mountain Rise cemetery, Pietermaritzburg, also spouse.


284. Sidney Walton Hancock

1897 21 Jun - born at Pleasantview Farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1897 16 Jul - died at Pleasantview Farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.


285. Claude Vernon Hancock

1898 04 Sep - born at Pleasantview Farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1917 13 Oct - died in France (WWI).

2012 02 Jan - Note from John Powell:
Died unmarried.
Buried France. No marked grave.
2nd SA Infantry (2 SAI) Brigade. No. 14275.
Natal Archives, Pietermaritzburg: Deceased Estate 1974/1917.


286. Audrey Vera Hancock

1900 24 May - born Pleasantview Farm, Sneezewood, Upper Umzimkulu, Cape Colony.

1973 13 May - died at Johannesburg, Transvaal.

2012 02 Jan - Note from John Powell:
Married first, Lionel Saxey DAVEY. 3 children.
Married second, Oswald Ernest WALLER. No Issue.
Audrey and her second husband were killed in a motor accident.


101. Margaret Ann Hulley

1912 - Depot: KAB Source MOOC Type: Leer Vol. no: 6/9/701 System: 01 Ref: 2906 Part 1
Description: KERR, MARGARET ANN. NEE HULLEY. DEATH NOTICE.

1917 - Depot: KAB Source: CSC Type: Leer Vol. no: 2/6/1/536 System: 01 Ref: 732 Part 1
Description: MOTION. OPPOSED APPLICATION. DAVID BLACK, TRUSTEE OF THE ASSIGNED ESTATE
OF JOHN MCKINNON, MARY ELIZABETH KERR AND LILIAN KERR TRADING AS MCKINNON AND KERR
VERSUS REVEREND P HARGREAVES, EXECUTOR OF ESTATE LATE JAMES KERR AND MARGARET
ANN KERR (BORN HULLEY), AND MARY ELIZABETH KERR AND LILIAN KERR. INTERDICT.


287. Mary Elizabeth Kerr

1917 - Depot: KAB Source: CSC Type: Leer Vol. no: 2/6/1/536 System: 01 Ref: 732 Part 1
Description: MOTION. OPPOSED APPLICATION. DAVID BLACK, TRUSTEE OF THE ASSIGNED ESTATE
OF JOHN MCKINNON, MARY ELIZABETH KERR AND LILIAN KERR TRADING AS MCKINNON AND KERR
VERSUS REVEREND P HARGREAVES, EXECUTOR OF ESTATE LATE JAMES KERR AND MARGARET
ANN KERR (BORN HULLEY), AND MARY ELIZABETH KERR AND LILIAN KERR. INTERDICT.

Died unmarried - Information from Mrs Strachan nee Hulley


102. Ernest Harden Hulley

1903 - Depot: KAB Source: NA Type: Leer Vol. no: 617 System: 01 Ref: B1887 Part 1
Description: APPLICATION BY MR. HULLEY FOR TRADING SITE AT MAHAHAMANE, MOUNT FRERE
DISTRICT.

1903 - Depot: KAB Source: LND Type: Leer Vol. no: 1/874 System: 01 Ref: L16143 Part 1
Description: APPLICATION BY EH HULLEY FOR A TRADING SITE AT MAHAHAMANE, MT. FRERE
DISTRICT.

1904 - Depot: KAB Source: LND Type: Leer Vol. no: 1/898 System: 01 Ref: L16918 Part 1
Description: APPLICATION BY EH HULLEY FOR A TRADING SITE AT LUKUNILANYE, MT. FRERE
DISTRICT.

1905 - Depot: KAB Source: DOC Type: Leer Vol. no: 4/1/1149 System: 01 Ref: 4959 Part 1
Description: MORTGAGE BOND. ERNEST HARDEN HULLEY.

1910-1911 - Depot: KAB Source: DOC Type: Leer Vol. no: 4/1/1465 System: 01 Ref: 3342 Part 1
Description: MORTGAGE BOND. ERNEST HARDEN HULLEY.


107. Francis Richard Hulley

1873 07 Dec - born at Mount Currie, Cape Colony

1893 07 Apr - married Marai Magdalene (Magdalina) Masema

1895 11 Sep - son Louis Benjamin born.

1899-1902 - Anglo-Boer War records Transcription:-
First Name Francis R
Last Name Hulley
Service No.
Rank Transport Conductor
Regiment Natal Transport
Notes Address: Upper Umzimkulu; The Queen's South Africa (QSA) Medal Clasps: none.
Rolls Roll: 216, Page: 157

1910 - Depot: KAB Source: DOC Type: Leer Vol. no: 4/1/1479 System: 01 Ref: 4323 Part 1
Description: MORTGAGE BOND. FRANCIS RICHARD HULLEY.

1926 24 Feb - Margaret Nancy Cemane (nee Mpujabi) married Francis Richard Hulley at Harding, Natal.

Note: The surname of Cemane is confirmed by a descendant, Ronelle Cain. It is stated that she was a
Zulu woman. It was customary for a man to give his wife names when they married, so it must be
presumed that Francis named her Margaret Nancy.

2012 02 Jan - Note by John Powell:
Microfilm #1926385 Mount Currie Birth Certificates: 1895 Item 4 Dates follow American convention of MMDDYY.
Entry #125 Father: Francis HULLEY, European, 23, born Cape Colony, Grain Farmer Mother: Maria Magdalene (Magdalena) MASEMA, Batlapin, 22, born Cape Colony,
Housewife Child: Louis Benjamin HULLEY Born: 9/11/1895 Date of Marriage: 4/7/1893 Other Children: 1 son (living) Residence: Farm Rosival, Ward No. 7 Witness: Sarah MASEMA, Nurse

The Batlapin tribe, part of the wider Bechuana peoples and language group, were settled in the north-
west Cape Colony, western Transvaal and Orange Free State, as well as southern Botswana. Taungs,
Kuruman and Mafikeng (formerly Mafeking) are urban centres.

Other information from John Powell:

KAB
Source: DOC; Type: LEER; Volume:_NO 4/1/1479; System: 01; Reference: 4323; Part: 1;
Description: Mortgage Bond. Francis Richard Hulley.
Starting: 19100000
Ending: 19100000

NAB
Source: MSCE; Type: LEER; Volume:_NO 0; System: 01; Reference: 24794/1936; Part: 1;
Description: Hulley.Francis Richard. (S/S Margaret; born Mpujabi).
Starting: 1936
Ending: 1942

2013 15 Mar - information from a restricted source:
Francis Richard HULLEY, born 9 Dec 1873 in Bathurst, E C, died 30 Sep 1936 in Addington Hospital,
Durban., occupation a grain farmer on "Rosival" farm, Harding, Natal. ~§~ He was named after his two
grandfathers, Francis Whittal and Richard Hulley. According to a restricted source, he died as an infant,
but that he grew up, married twice, and had a number of children is now known (2003).
A death notice obtained from Pietermaritzburg Archives shows that he was married twice with seven
children, but it does not state which wife had the children. It is not certain how many children he had
with the first wife as some may have died. It has been assumed that the eldest children were that of the
first wife and the others that of his second wife as there is a ten year age gap between the second and
the third child. He was legally married to his second wife but not sure about the first. The two eldest
sons are not shown on the death notice of their father, which could also mean that they were not the
widow's sons.
Francis Richard Hulley was a farmer and a storekeeper and lived at Harding, Natal. The 1820 Settler
Family Trees CD states that a F R Hulley died in 1932 leaving a widow Margaret who Russell Clayton
shows as Margaret Cemane. He did in fact marry two women of a different race, most probably Zulu.
(Harding Marriage Register. 3.8.1867 - 3.2.1921) .In the Magistrates Office on the 24th Febraury 1926,
Francis Richard Hulley and Margaret Cemane appeared before Malcolm Thurston, SJP, to obtain a
marriage special licence. Thurston declared them man and wife.

(From Wikipedia) - Harding is a town situated in the Mzimkulwana River valley, KwaZulu-Natal, South
Africa. Harding was established as a military outpost following the United Kingdom's annexation of East
Griqualand in 1874 and was named after the first chief of justice for Natal, Sir Walter Harding. Timber
and dairy farming are the main economic activities. The 122 kilometres (76 mi) narrow gauge Alfred
County Railway served the farming areas, linking Harding with Port Shepstone".


Maria Magdaline (Magdalina) Masema

1871 - born at Cape Colony

1893 07 Apr - married Francis Richard Hulley. It is not certain whether she was from a Zulu or a Xhosa clan. The
names Maria and Magdalena must have been given by her husband or the church.

1895 11 Sep - son Louis Benjamin born.

2012 02 Jan - Note by John Powell:
Microfilm #1926385 Mount Currie Birth Certificates: 1895 Item 4 Dates follow American convention of
MMDDYY.
Entry #125 Father: Francis HULLEY, European, 23, born Cape Colony, Grain Farmer Mother: Maria Magdalene (Magdalena) MASEMA, Batlapin, 22, born Cape Colony,
Housewife Child: Louis Benjamin HULLEY Born: 9/11/1895 Date of Marriage: 4/7/1893 Other Children: 1 son (living) Residence: Farm Rosival, Ward No. 7 Witness: Sarah MASEMA, Nurse

The Batlapin tribe, part of the wider Bechuana peoples and language group, were
settled in the north-west Cape Colony, western Transvaal and Orange Free State, as
well as southern Botswana. Taungs, Kuruman and Mafikeng (formerly Mafeking) are
urban centres.


300. Male Hulley

bef 1895 - born.

2012 02 Jan - Note by John Powell:
Microfilm #1926385 Mount Currie Birth Certificates: 1895 Item 4 Dates follow American convention of
MMDDYY.
Entry #125 Father: Francis HULLEY, European, 23, born Cape Colony, Grain Farmer Mother: Maria Magdalene (Magdalena) MASEMA, Batlapin, 22, born Cape Colony,
Housewife Child: Louis Benjamin HULLEY Born: 9/11/1895 Date of Marriage: 4/7/1893 Other Children: 1 son (living) Residence: Farm Rosival, Ward No. 7 Witness: Sarah MASEMA, Nurse

The Batlapin tribe, part of the wider Bechuana peoples and language group, were
settled in the north-west Cape Colony, western Transvaal and Orange Free State, as
well as southern Botswana. Taungs, Kuruman and Mafikeng (formerly Mafeking) are
urban centres.


108. Harden Whittal Hulley

1875 12 Aug - born in Umzimkulu, Natal. Harden was his grandmother's surname and Whittal his mother's. His
occupation was a Storekeeper. According to the 1820 Settler Centenary Records they lived at Coleford,
Natal.

1917 22 Aug - married at Highlands Hall, County/Division of Underberg, Polila, Colony of Natal:
Harden Whittal Hulley 42 Bachelor farmer Epsom, Underberg; Violet Elizabeth Boucher 19 Spinster of
Selborn, Underberg. Married by Banns with Parent's consent. Wits: Richard Percy Jackson, John
Bulram Nicholson.

1899-1902 - Anglo-Boer War records Transcription:-
First Name H. W.
Last Name Hulley
Service No. 13
Rank Lieutenant
Regiment Natal Volunteer Composite Regiment
Notes TNA WO127. Nominal rolls colonial units.
Rolls

1902 09 May Depot: TAB Source: LD Type: Leer Vol. no: 71 System: 01 Ref: AG2640/A/02 Part 1
Description: PASS OFFICERS - BARBERTON AND KOMATI POORT MR. SJ HULLEY (BARBERTON)
AND LANCE SERGEANT WILLIAMS (KOMATI POORT). Ending 1903 09 Jan.

1903 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE NHD; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO II/1/49; SYSTEM 02; REFERENCE
HDE551/1903; PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: HW HULLEY, UMZIMKULU, EAST GRIQUALAND: OFFERING NATIVE LABOUR.

1932 03 May - died in Grey's Hospital, Pietermaritzburg, Natal.


Violet Elizabeth Boucher

1897 29 Sep - born at Perefontein, Imvenyane- from Baptism entry.

1899 17 Oct - baptised at St Stephen's church, Matatiele:
Parent's names - father - Henry Cameron Boucher of Perefontein, Farmer;
mother - Mary Ann Richardson of Imvenyne
Sponsors - Henry Joachim Miller, Elizabeth Magdeline Miller.
Minister - T. W. Green

1917 22 Aug - married at Highlands Hall, County/Division of Underberg, Polila, Colony of Natal:
Harden Whittal Hulley 42 Bachelor farmer Epsom, Underberg; Violet Elizabeth Boucher 19 Spinster of
Selborn, Underberg. Married by Banns with Parent's consent. Wits: Richard Percy Jackson, John Bulram
Nicholson.


313. Reginald Harden ("Reggie") Hulley

1924 24 May - born at Mataliele, Kwa-Zulu Natal.

1945 17 Jul - killed in the Second World war at Khartoum, Sudan. Buried in the Kharttoum War Cemetery, Sudan in
Grave 10.A.8. He was a Lieutenant in the South African Force.


111. Herbert Clayton Hulley

1881 22 Jun - born at Cuylerville, Eastern Cape

1881 20 Nov - baptised at St John's church Bathurst, Eastern Cape

1899-1902 - Anglo-Boer War records Transcription:-
First Name H. C. Herbert Clayton
Last Name Hulley Hulley
Service No. 41
Rank Trooper Private
Regiment East Griqualand Mounted Rifles Border Horse
Notes
Rolls Roll 247 Roll 236

1906 11 Oct - married Martha Alice Hulley (cousin) at Vaalfontein Farm Mount Currie District

1907 18 Sep - dau Majorie Alice born at Vaalfontein Farm Swartberg, East Griqualand

1908 - dau Evelyn Martha born

1913 00 ---- - son Isaac Leslie born at Mount Currie district

1914 01 Aug - son Stanley Reuben born at Swartberg, Mount Currie district

1914-1918 War - Enlisted in S.A. Imperial Forces as a volunteer and saw active service in France. Like his settler
ancestor, he too was an artilleryman. Information from Frank Hulley, New Zealand.

1917 01 Dec - dau Katheleen Clayton born at Mount Currie.

1920 02 Jul - son Douglas Clifford born

Unknown date - dau Evelyn born

unknown date - dau Katheleen Clayton married Colin Muir

1921 - dau Evelyn Martha died from burns.

1939- 45 War - son Isaac Leslie enlisted as a volunteer with Union Defence Force and saw active service in
Abyssinia and North Africa as Infantryman, and tank crew in Italy. Information from Frank Hulley,
New Zealand.

1939-45 War - son Stanley Reuben enlisted as a volunteer with Union Defence Force and saw active service in
Infantry and tanks in Abyssinia and North Africa. Information from Frank Hulley, New Zealand.

1939-45 War - son Douglas Clifford enlisted as a volunteer with Union Defence Force and saw active service in the
Infantry in Abyssinia and North Africa. Wounded at el Alamein. Information from Frank Hulley, New
Zealand.

1946 07 Dec - son Stanley Reuben married Stephne Botha

1956 29 Feb - son Isaac Leslie died at the Usher Memorial Hospital, East Griqualand

2008 Apr - Note by John Powell: Herbert Clayton Hulley returned from active service in WW1 suffering from
shellshock. The usufruct of Vaalfontein farm and Forres farm was left to Herbert Clayton Hulley by his
deceased spouse, but he renounced this in favour of their children. Martha also owned Forres farm.


Martha Alice Hulley

This person is the same as Martha Alice Hulley ref. 126.


317. Evelyn Martha Hulley

1908 - born

1921 - died from burns.

The above information has been submitted by Margaret Peverell July 2004.

2008 Apr - Note fom John Powell - I seem to remember that she died after being burnt by an
exploding paraffin cooker, but this needs verifictaion.


319. Isaac Lesley Hulley

1913 00 ---- - born at Mount Currie district

1939- 1945 War - Enlisted as a volunteer with Union Defence Force and saw active service in Abyssinia
and North Africa as Infantryman, and tank crew in Italy. Information from Frank Hulley,
New Zealand.

1956 29 Feb - died at the Usher Memorfial Hospital, East Griqualand

2008 Apr - Note from John Powell: manager of Stafford farm, Kokstad.


321. Kathleen Clayton Hulley

This person is the same as ref. 535.

1917 01 Dec - born at Mount Currie.

unknown date - married Colin Muir

1965 31 Aug - married in Kokstad Francis Edward Hulley (son of Thomas Benjamin Hulley and Georgina Marian Johanna
Coleman)

1971 22 Jun - died at Grey's Hospital, Pietermaritzburg


Frank Edward Hulley

This person is the same as ref. 271.


323. Evelyn Hulley

Unknown date - born


112. Jane Maria Harden Hulley

1883 17 Jul - born in Swartberg, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa

(unknown date) - married Emmanuel Joshua Bold in Mount Frere.

1919 10 Nov - son Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold born

1921 30 Jun - dau Eunice Hazel born

1922 07 Nov - dau Iris Una born

1924 31 May - died


Emmanuel Joshua Bold

1888 18 Nov - born at Mount Frere - information from Darryl Allwright.

1959 14 Oct - died in in Matatiele - information from Darryl Allwright.

2015 05 Apr - INFORMATION FROM GORDON BOLD CONCERNING HIS FAMILY’S LINKS TO THE HULLEY
FAMILY AND OTHERS IN SOUTH AFRICA

Now for a little more trivia for you regarding the SA 01; below is an extract from my father’s (ie Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold) unfinished memoirs which you may find rather interesting:

My father, Emmanuel Joshua Bold, married Jane Hulley shortly after returning from military service at the end of World War 1. He owned a General Dealer’s business in the town but unfortunately he was overgenerous with credit extended to customers that led to his own insolvency.

My mother died when I was about five years old, and we three children, my two younger sisters, Hazel and Iris, and myself were taken in by Granny and Grandpa Bold for a while. I do not remember much about my mother, only old Gaffney’s kindergarten for my first day of school, and not being very happy about it.

Another thing I recall was when I was returning home from kindergarten one day on my tricycle, I was confronted by a few herded cattle near our house, I became terrified and started screaming attracting mother’s attention, whereupon she came out into the street to pacify me. On another occasion my mother called me to the front gate saying ‘’You always want to know how the roads are made. Look there,’’ I saw a Scotch Cart drawn by two oxen and loaded with gravel, men with shovels walking beside it. I was a little disappointed at the ordinariness of road making......maybe I was expecting to see bulldozers in those far-off days.

I remember the first aeroplane I saw, a Tiger Moth that came to Matatiele, and I stared in wonder as it flew over our house.

We children were taken from the care of our Grandparents and then put in the care of my mother’s brother and sister, Uncle Herbert Hulley and Aunt Dolly Jackson respectively. I stayed with Aunt Dolly while Hazel and Iris remained with Uncle Herbert. Many years later I learned that they were keen to adopt us but that my father would not agree. This was probably the reason why we were returned to our Grandparents after some time.

We had a coloured nanny, Margaret, looking after us at Granny’s. I do not know how long we stayed there but one day, for some reason, the nanny and we children were moved to Biggs’ boarding house.

Sometime later my father took the three of us by train to ‘Maritzburg’ (Pietermaritzburg) where Hazel and Iris were admitted to St. Cross Orphanage. I then travelled on my own by train to Durban, where on arrival I was picked up by a small van and taken to St. Martin’s Home For Boys - all prearranged. Understandably, I was not happy in a place like that. The food was bad, for instance, there were often worms in the mealie-meal porridge and in the boiled dried beans and any complaints by us to the nuns were rejected with a stern reprimand.

Before we left to go to the orphanages Dad bought us several outfits each of school-type clothing, but after I had changed out of my clothes at the Home I never saw them again, including my spare outfits. Dad came to visit me on one occasion and brought a few cases of peaches with him, and which were given out at the next meal-time, one peach per child, and leaving about half over and that was taken away never to be seen again. A few months after that we were on one of our regular exercise walks in the surrounding streets, a ragged column of boys being herded by one of the staff, when to my surprise I saw my Dad getting out of a rickshaw and coming over to talk to our supervisor. He then took me into the rickshaw with him, looking at my ragged and patched clothing and bare feet, wanting to know what had happened to my good clothes and shoes. My reply was that I hadn’t seen them since my arrival at the place.

We went into the city where I was fitted out with decent clothes and shoes, had some good food and returned to the Home where Dad immediately signed me out. That same afternoon we left for Maritzburg where Dad went to St. Cross Orphanage and got Hazel and Iris out, then we all set out on the overnight train to Franklin. The next day Uncle Herbert Hulley came in his six-horse carriage to take Iris and Hazel to his farm, ‘Vaalfontein’, and a few days later I was sent to Bulwer School Hostel by train in the care of a kindly policeman who was travelling to the same place.

My cousins the Hulley boys and Guy Jackson all attended the Bulwer school but weren’t Hostel residents, boarding instead with Mrs. Growee who owned a large house on a half-acre lot adjoining the Hostel grounds. The Hulley boys told me, on several occasions, that I would be moving in with them at the boarding house, something I eagerly looked forward to as they lived a less restricted existence than I did at the Hostel. It was much better than the Orphanage, better food and clothes. However, I never did go to the boarding house where the Hulley lads lived because the school holidays came up and that ended my sojourn at Bulwer.

To put the above in perspective it all reverts back to Richard Brangan Hulley and his first wife Jane Maria Harden (my great-great-grandparents), their daughter Martha Hulley sister of Ruben Hulley (my great-grandfather) married William Jackson. Their son Richard (Percy) Jackson married Florence (Dolly) Annie Hulley, his first cousin, the daughter of Ruben Hulley and Mary Ann Whittal (my great-grandparents). Well why so interesting one may ask? Well to add to this my father’s uncle Herbert Clayton Hulley also married his first cousin Martha Alice Hulley the daughter of Isaac Edgar Hulley and Alice Sarah Hancock. Isaac Edgar Hulley , half-brother of Ruben Hulley (my great-grandfather) was the son of Richard Brangan Hulley (my great-great-grandfather) and his second wife Caroline Dugmore. My grandmother Jane Maria Harden Hulley (wife of Emmanuel Joshua Bold - my grandfather) was the younger sister of Florence (Dolly) Annie Hulley and Herbert Clayton Hulley. My grandmother died when Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold (my father) was 5 years of age, my aunt Hazel (Eunice Hazel Bold) was around 3 years of age at the and my aunt Iris (Iris Una Bold) was around 2 years of age.

To take this one step further looking at my father’s name Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold, all famous names of the 1820 settlers:
· Whittal - My father’s mother was Jane Maria Harden Hulley the daughter of Ruben Hulley and Mary Ann Whittal. Mary Ann Whittal was the daughter of Francis Whittal and Ann Clayton (daughter of William Clayton and Judith Thorpe). Francis Whittal his land by purchasing other allotments on the location and by “standing his ground” during three Frontier Wars. He commanded the Burger Forces at Cuylerville when it was besieged in the 7th Frontier War of 1846, he was around 49 years of age at the time. The schoolhouse at Cuylerville (now St Mary's Anglican Church in Cuylerville) became a laager, known as Whittal’s Laager. The Lychgate at Cuylerville cemetery commemorates the defence of Cuylerville in 1851. During this attack, Whittle's homestead and haystacks on Pomeroy (Francis Whittal’s farm) were destroyed. Ann Whittal, (nee Clayton) unlike Elizabeth Salt has no commemoration plaque or memorial in Cuylerville, as per Elizabeth Salt’s memorial in Grahamstown. However, like Elizabeth Salt (also associated with the Bold family through marriage), during the disturbances of 1847, when the small community of Cuylerville was being besieged in their church-come-school building, Ann Whittal regularly crept out of their barricade every night to visit the abandoned homesteads to gather what she could, and bring it back to those who were fighting for their lives in the communal centre. Ann Whittal (my great-great-grandmother) was the mother of Mary Ann Whittal (my great-grandmother).

The Xhosa Wars (also known as the Cape Frontier Wars or "Africa's 100 Years War"), were a series of nine wars or flare-ups (from 1779 to 1879) between the Xhosa tribes and European settlers, in what is now the Eastern Cape in South Africa. These events were the longest-running military action in African colonialism history. The 7th Frontier War (1846-47), also known as the ‘War of the Axe’ or ‘Amatola War’. Governor Maitland imposed a new system of treaties on the Xhosa chiefs without consulting them. A severe drought forced desperate Xhosa to engage in cattle raids across the frontier in order to survive. In addition, Robert Godlonton continued to use his newspaper the Graham's Town Journal to agitate for Eastern Cape settlers to annexe and settle the land that had been returned to the Xhosa after the previous war. However the event that actually triggered war was when a Khoi (Dutch settlers labelled them Hottentots) escort was transporting a manacled Xhosa thief to Grahamstown to be tried for stealing an axe, when Xhosa raiders attacked and killed the Khoi escort. The Xhosa refused to surrender the murderer and war broke out in March 1846.

The regular British forces suffered initial setbacks; a British column sent to confront the Ngqika chief, Mgolombane Sandile, was temporarily delayed at the Amatola Mountains and the attacking Xhosa were able to capture the centre of the three mile long wagon train which was not being defended, carrying away the British officer's supply of wine and other supplies. The local Commandos were very much more effective in the rough and mountainous terrain, as they had extensive local knowledge.

Governor Maitland (General Sir Peregrine Maitland, GCB) was replaced by Rt. Hon. Lt-Gen Sir Henry Pottinger, 1st Baronet, GCB, PC, the uncle of Elizabeth Pottinger (my great-great-grandmother’s uncle). The British Government developed the idea based on an idea originally created by Lieutenant-General Sir Benjamin D'Urban, GCB, KCH, KCTS, FRS (an ex-Governor of the cape Colony) of creating a form of protectorate to be known as British Kaffraria, in which the Paramount Xhosa Chief and subordinate chiefs of the various Xhosa tribes and their people would acknowledge the Queen as their protector and would recognise their subordination in civil and military affairs to a British military commander. Earl Grey and Lord John Russell agreed to implement Sir Benjamin D'Urban's (Port Natal became known as Durban named after D’Urban) plans but in a modified form, the modified scheme was partly formulated by Sir Henry Pottinger, who had had extensive experience of the system concerning indirect rule in India. Sir Henry Pottinger himself was considered the ideal person to implement the new system because of his experience in India and because he was in Britain at the time, with no immediate assignment. He thus became the Governor of the Cape Colony and also demanded that he be known as "High Commissioner" in addition to that of "Governor", hence he became the 1st High Commissioner of Southern Africa. His intentions were not to remain in Africa because he actually preferred to return to India; therefore, his acceptance of the post was conditional dependent on the first available post in India.

Unfortunately Sir Henry Pottinger on taking up the position as Governor of the Cape Colony was not able to implement the new system. When he arrived at Cape Town in January 1847, he discovered that the war was still being waged and his task was therefore devoted to ending the conflict. A post in India came up as Governor of Madras and he took it after concluding the ‘War of the Axe’ (7th Frontier War). His successor Sir Harry Smith returned as Governor of the Cape Colony and with instructions to annex the territory between the Keiskamma and Kei Rivers, under the title British Kaffraria.

POMEROY has an interesting history as it very much associated with the Whittal family and so to Harden family. POMEROY Nature Reserve today comprises of three farms which date back to the 1820 settlers and which are referred to in the definitive account of BAILIE'S PARTY OF THE 1820 SETTLERS written by M D Nash. Francis Whittal (my great great-grandfather) owned Pomeroy. William Harden, born in 1794, Middlesex married Maria Darvill, born 1794, Middlesex, their children being:
o Jane Maria Harden (my great-great-grandmother) who married Richard Brangan Hulley; and
o Maria Harden.

After the death of William Harden, Maria Harden (nee Darvill) his widow (who was famous for her amazing story of tenacious survival) and a wealthy landowner of considerable property situated in the location of Pomeroy, married a William Fletcher and they had three children.

Horace Fletcher, a descendant of William Fletcher and Maria Harden married late in life to a widow, Mrs Francis of Port Alfred. In 1918 Mr Fletcher owned Henry Lloyd's allotment (Mount Wellington), Francis Whittal’s farm (Pomeroy) and he had also inherited Bellevue from his father. When Horace Fletcher died, the three properties (Mount Wellington , Bellevue and Pomeroy) passed through his will to his wife's adult children.

Boucher - my father’s uncle Harden Whittal Hulley married a Violet Boucher and my father’s grandfather John William Bold (my great-grandfather) was married to a Maria Elizabeth Boucher (my great-grandmother).

2015 06 Apr - ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FROM GORDON BOLD ABOUT HIS ANCESTORS

When my father (Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold) was around 14 years of age he would sit down with his grandfather (John William Bold) and scribed his grandfather’s memoirs, entitled ‘When Diamonds were used as Bullets’. It was 1933 and his grandfather at that time was pretty old and on his deathbed. When my great-grandfather (John William Bold) died apparently thousands attended his funeral and his unfinished memoirs written by my father was published in ‘The Matatiele Mail’, Thursday , September, 21st 1933. I was told by my father that it is often said and apparently also once mentioned in ‘The Matatiele Mail’ that he (my great-grandfather) built Matatiele. Below is a copy of what is written in the newspaper cutting as dictated by John William Bold (my great-grandfather) to his grandson Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold (my father), which has nothing really to do with the Hulley family, but thought you would enjoy reading it:

When Diamonds were used as Bullets
As told by the late Mr. J Bold

Mr J. Bold, who died recently, commenced to dictate the story of his adventurous career while lying on his deathbed. The story as set forth below ends most dramatically, for as he finished telling how he escaped the bullets of the natives, his end came.

The Zulu War in 1879 was my third campaign. We went through Uitrecht, over the Lunieburg and, when about half our troops were across the Intombi river it came down in flood with the result that one half of the troops were on the one side and the other half were camped on the opposite banks. At break of day the Zulus attached those troops on the opposite bank, while we on our side kept up a continuous fire on the Native hordes. However, our firing did not seem to disturb the attacking Zulus and the massacre continued. With the exception of one man the whole regiment of the 88th Dragoon Guards was wiped out.

Elated with victory the Zulus then decided to attack us on the other side of the river. As I have already said, the river was in flood and the current very strong. However, the Zulus were determined to attack and entering the water with shields and assegais held aloft they commenced their perilous crossing. Soon they were caught in the strong current and as they drifted down the river were shot by our men. Realising the hopelessness of their position those on the bank retired to safety.

When at last the river was passable we went over and buried our dead in one large grave.

That being finished we followed on the spoors of the Natives and formed a laager, which we named Kambula. Our guide was a Transvaaler named Joubert, who knew the country well. From here we pushed on towards Hlobane in Northern Natal where we were commanded to go on patrol under Colonel Buller. As we were crossing the Hlobane Mountains to our left we saw a small party of Zulus and immediately opened fire and eventually charged down upon them; they ran further up the mountainside and we followed them. When on top of the mountains we formed into skirmishing order, advancing rapidly. As luck would have it the men on both the right and left flanks looked down the side of the hill and shouted:

“Look at them Coming”.

And sure enough there were masses of the blacks coming up the hillside. We had been led into a trap by the small band of natives we had followed. Our forces were too small to withstand the attack of the savage hordes and our only escape was over the nose of the mountain. It was lucky for us that our men had seen the advancing natives; otherwise we must have all perished.

Soon the word was given by Colonel Buller: “Retire, men, retire.” We led our horses down the precipitous sides of the mountain. Capt. Wetherley, his son and Piet Uys with about one hundred men bore the brunt of the fighting and of those hundred brave men only seven reached safety. Those of us to the left kept up a continuous fire on the hordes of natives who appeared to take little notice of us despite the fact that they were being cut down by our fire. It was hot work and we had to be very careful not to be caught. Soon the Zulus began to concentrate upon finishing our small party and, seeing them from a left and right wing, it was quickly realised that it would be useless for us to try and withstand the attack Colonel Buller again gave the order: “Retire, men, retire.”

We raced away and the Zulus turned to the mountains and as we proceeded at a walk about 500 yards away one of the Zulus shouted: “Good-bye, white-man: we have had some of you to-day but tomorrow we will be coming back to stab you all and make breakfast of you.”

I asked Colonel Buller whether he had heard the kaffir shouting and he asked me what he had said. When I told him, he replied, “ we were lead into a trap today and if they come tomorrow they will not have it all their way.”

The following day they surrounded our camp just at a time when dinner was cooking. I might tell you that we did not eat dinner that day for no sooner had they surrounded us than the engagement commenced. They attacked furiously throughout the afternoon and only retired when darkness approached. Next morning the ground round our laager was strewn with dead and dying natives, many of them having dumplings in their hands, which we had cooked for our own dinner.

We were warned by our officers for fatigue duty to ride the dead Zulus from the vicinity of our camp. We did not like the job and grumbling among the men commenced who said, “the world is wide why cannot we rather shift camp instead of doing this dirty work?’ The officers replied: “Well men, you are right but we cannot help it because the Zulu army may still be watching us and attack us on the line of march. When we shift from here we cannot go forward but will have to return to Uitrecht to await reinforcements.”

The night before we shifted camp we were told to pack up early in the morning. About none o’clock I was walking through the laager visit one of my chums when, all at once, I heard the picket challenge: “Halt, who goes there?” I heard a reply : Frenchie.”

“Advance, Frenchie,” and I give the challenge sign.

“I’ve got no counter sign,” came the replying.

I heard the guard’s voice again say: “Advance Frenchie.”

Frenchie was taken to the picket tent and I ran to see who it was and, seeing that it was Frenchie. I sat down in front of the tent to hear what he had to say.

Frenchie’ Story

Frenchie said that he had been taken prisoner at the fight on the hill a few days previous and taken to Cetshwayo to be killed by him. When in front of Cetshwayo the Chief said that he did not want to kill white men anymore as he had already killed enough but that his brother, Abelime was desirous of killing white men. They tied Frenchie’s hands and told him that he must eat grass while some of the Zulu women amused themselves by pulling out his beard. Later, Cetshwayo sent him with two Zulu’s to Estcourt to his brother Abelime to be killed by him. The two Zulu warriors were well armed and after marching some distance they loosened Frenchie’s arms, which had been tied behind his back, so that he would be able to walk faster. They marched their prisoner towards Kambula camp from where they would turn to the right to Estcourt. When about six miles away one of the Zulus halted and put down his weapon and having said something to the other guard, went towards a mealie patch. The other guard then sat down close to Frenchie and putting down his weapon took out his snuff box and just as he was indulging himself Frenchie seized his gun and shot him. Frenchie then pointed the gun at the other Zulu who ran away. Carrying the arms of both the guards Frenchie made for the camp and arrived there as black as a kaffir and as naked as the day on which he was born. The following day we packed up and returned to Uitrecht were we stayed until such time as reinforcements arrived. We then advanced again into Zululand and formed a laager beyond the Kambula camp. The day following our arrival I was on horse guard and, looking towards Maritzburg I saw on top of a hill an heliograph and hastened back to camp to acquaint them with what I had seen. Our heliograph operator sent out the challenge: “Who are you?” and back came the reply “Newdigates’s column. Prince Imperial killed. Come and help find the body.”

Prince Imperial

We advanced in skirmishing order, expecting to be attacked at any moment. However, we reached our destination and found his body in a donga, quite naked with twenty-two assegai stabs in it. The body was put on a mule wagon and escorted by the Lancers into Dundee. We then set out for our laager but darkness falling went into a hollow in which tambukie grass grew and sat throughout the night holding the bridles of our horses. At daybreak we mounted and rode back to camp. Arriving there we were informed that at two o’clock next morning we were to strike camp and proceed to the place where we had found the body pf the Prince Imperial. On our arrival Newdigate’s column was attached to us and we continued our march towards Enyati hill where the Zulu Impis were awaiting us. We had to cross a sandy donga where we experienced some trouble with the wagons. At that time I was a wagon guard; each troop’s wagon had to be guarded by one of their men because people used to steal things from them. Some of the wagons in front had negotiated the donga and just as I got mine through I heard a shout just the other side of a small rise. Seeing people running in the direction whence the shouting came I thought it was another of those small wild bucks. My wagon was proceeding towards the place where the laager was to be formed and one of my chums was sent to see whether I had been able to get the wagon through the donga. He met me coming along with it. I was then leading my horse and he was walking by my side. Seeing some Swazis passing, carrying what I thought to be stumps of wood cut into pieces, which looked something like sugar-bush wood, I asked my chum where the kaffirs had got the chunks of wood from as there was no bush in the vicinity.

A Big Snake

He replied that it was the big snake they were carrying and I asked him of what big snake he was speaking. He replied: “The snake that had the ox by the nose.” I told him that as I was older than he it was not right for him to try and play the fool with me, to which he replied: “Don’t get cross with me; if you doubt my word call to that black kaffir and ask him to stop and then you will see that I am right.” I did so and sure enough it was a snake. It was the tail part that he was carrying and I asked him what he was going to do with it, to which he replied: “We are going to boil it and drink the soup and the fat we are going to rub on our bodies. Speaking in the native language, I said to him, “Go on you dirty thing.”

The following morning we continued our march towards Enyati hill, A and B, troop in front as advance guard with Colonel Buller and Capt. Prier. As we got into line with Enyati hill about a hundred Zulus jumped from the river and ran towards the hill. We did not know that actually the impis were awaiting for us on the face of the hill where they had taken up position behind stones. The hill like a half moon and the fleeing Zulus kept stopping and looking back at us . It was then that Colonel Buller gave the order to charge and as we chased them they ran past the face of the hill and turned towards a donga leading towards the hill. We then made a frontal attack up the hill, Capt. Prier being just in front of me and Colonel Buller on my right. When we got about 200 yards from the foot of the hill Capt. Prier said to Colonel Buller: “Shall I take them further in, sir?” I then said to Prier: “ Do you want the men to lead their horses, sir?” we then halted and Colonel Buller asked Capt. Prier what he had said. He replied as above and again I repeated my question. Before he had time to answer I observed three Zulus going along the hill and they stopped and looked at us. The Capt. Asked whether I had seen them to which I replied in the affirmative. Well, shoot them, he said and I took aim and fired and they disappeared behind a stone. No sooner had I fired than the whole face of the hill was a mass of smoke and bullets rained down on us Capt. Prier than gave word to dismount. We were lying on the plain where not even a stone was to be had to shelter your head. I did not mind the bullets winging over me but there were three bullets that were worrying me, dropping to my right and left and at last one struck straight in front of me and sent the dust flying over me. On my left I saw a man lying behind an ant heap and I jumped up and ran to him saying, “Lay that way.” He did not seem to care about doing it so I said, “ I will kick you.” With that he shifted a bit to the left and just as I was about to lay down a bullet touched my jacket. I threw myself down behind the ant heap. I had a black hat on my head and no sooner did I stick my head out with my gun to my shoulder than bullets came flying in my direction. I wanted to get those three natives who were sending bullets so perilously near my head; again I tried but before I could get in my shot bullets rained down close to me. The third time a bullet moved my hat so I removed it and threw it about a yard from me. It was then that I saw bullets striking around the hat and on looking round the right side of the ant heap I was able to see that it was three natives behind a stone that were causing me all the trouble. They were resting on their haunches on the stone and made a fine target. Taking careful aim I fired and all three disappeared behind the stone. I waited patiently for their reappearance and at last two of them came out and no sooner had they appeared than I fired and both dropped back. I then fired at any heads I could see popping out from behind the stones. Looking at my chum lying on my left I saw him put his gun on top of the ant heap and pull the trigger. I said to him, “What are you doing; you are shooting over the hilltop and wasting bullets.” With that he stopped shooting altogether. I kept blazing away and eventually got up and said to Capt. Priers: “What is the good of firing at smoke and stone. Some of our men are shooting over the hill.” With that I went across to him where he stood holding his horse and he asked me to hold his horse while he had a shot. I handed him my empty gun and a cartridge and just as he was about to load the gun a bullet whizzed between us. Dropping the cartridge he said, “Damn it; take your gun,” which I did and, picking up the cartridge.

My great-grandfather’s memoirs basically gives an account of the two other major defeats inflicted on the British by the Zulus, the Battle of Intombi Drift and the Battle of Hlobane plus the recovery of the Prince Imperial’s body, which followed the Battle of Isandlwana disaster (around 1500 British troops were killed , basically a whole battalion was wiped out). When my great-grandfather mentions, “The Zulu War in 1879 was my third campaign”, his first two campaigns were to do with the 9th Xhosa War (also known as the 9th Frontier war). Unfortunately, my great-grandfathers memoirs like my father’s memoirs, were unfinished.


324. Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold

1919 10 Nov - born - information from Gordon Bold

2004 15 Aug - died at Caboolture, Queensland, Australia - information from Gordon Bold

2015 05 Apr - INFORMATION FROM GORDON BOLD CONCERNING HIS FAMILY’S LINKS TO THE HULLEY
FAMILY AND OTHERS IN SOUTH AFRICA

Now for a little more trivia for you regarding the SA 01; below is an extract from my father’s (ie Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold) unfinished memoirs which you may find rather interesting:

My father, Emmanuel Joshua Bold, married Jane Hulley shortly after returning from military service at the end of World War 1. He owned a General Dealer’s business in the town but unfortunately he was overgenerous with credit extended to customers that led to his own insolvency.

My mother died when I was about five years old, and we three children, my two younger sisters, Hazel and Iris, and myself were taken in by Granny and Grandpa Bold for a while. I do not remember much about my mother, only old Gaffney’s kindergarten for my first day of school, and not being very happy about it.

Another thing I recall was when I was returning home from kindergarten one day on my tricycle, I was confronted by a few herded cattle near our house, I became terrified and started screaming attracting mother’s attention, whereupon she came out into the street to pacify me. On another occasion my mother called me to the front gate saying ‘’You always want to know how the roads are made. Look there,’’ I saw a Scotch Cart drawn by two oxen and loaded with gravel, men with shovels walking beside it. I was a little disappointed at the ordinariness of road making......maybe I was expecting to see bulldozers in those far-off days.

I remember the first aeroplane I saw, a Tiger Moth that came to Matatiele, and I stared in wonder as it flew over our house.

We children were taken from the care of our Grandparents and then put in the care of my mother’s brother and sister, Uncle Herbert Hulley and Aunt Dolly Jackson respectively. I stayed with Aunt Dolly while Hazel and Iris remained with Uncle Herbert. Many years later I learned that they were keen to adopt us but that my father would not agree. This was probably the reason why we were returned to our Grandparents after some time.

We had a coloured nanny, Margaret, looking after us at Granny’s. I do not know how long we stayed there but one day, for some reason, the nanny and we children were moved to Biggs’ boarding house.

Sometime later my father took the three of us by train to ‘Maritzburg’ (Pietermaritzburg) where Hazel and Iris were admitted to St. Cross Orphanage. I then travelled on my own by train to Durban, where on arrival I was picked up by a small van and taken to St. Martin’s Home For Boys - all prearranged. Understandably, I was not happy in a place like that. The food was bad, for instance, there were often worms in the mealie-meal porridge and in the boiled dried beans and any complaints by us to the nuns were rejected with a stern reprimand.

Before we left to go to the orphanages Dad bought us several outfits each of school-type clothing, but after I had changed out of my clothes at the Home I never saw them again, including my spare outfits. Dad came to visit me on one occasion and brought a few cases of peaches with him, and which were given out at the next meal-time, one peach per child, and leaving about half over and that was taken away never to be seen again. A few months after that we were on one of our regular exercise walks in the surrounding streets, a ragged column of boys being herded by one of the staff, when to my surprise I saw my Dad getting out of a rickshaw and coming over to talk to our supervisor. He then took me into the rickshaw with him, looking at my ragged and patched clothing and bare feet, wanting to know what had happened to my good clothes and shoes. My reply was that I hadn’t seen them since my arrival at the place.

We went into the city where I was fitted out with decent clothes and shoes, had some good food and returned to the Home where Dad immediately signed me out. That same afternoon we left for Maritzburg where Dad went to St. Cross Orphanage and got Hazel and Iris out, then we all set out on the overnight train to Franklin. The next day Uncle Herbert Hulley came in his six-horse carriage to take Iris and Hazel to his farm, ‘Vaalfontein’, and a few days later I was sent to Bulwer School Hostel by train in the care of a kindly policeman who was travelling to the same place.

My cousins the Hulley boys and Guy Jackson all attended the Bulwer school but weren’t Hostel residents, boarding instead with Mrs. Growee who owned a large house on a half-acre lot adjoining the Hostel grounds. The Hulley boys told me, on several occasions, that I would be moving in with them at the boarding house, something I eagerly looked forward to as they lived a less restricted existence than I did at the Hostel. It was much better than the Orphanage, better food and clothes. However, I never did go to the boarding house where the Hulley lads lived because the school holidays came up and that ended my sojourn at Bulwer.

To put the above in perspective it all reverts back to Richard Brangan Hulley and his first wife Jane Maria Harden (my great-great-grandparents), their daughter Martha Hulley sister of Ruben Hulley (my great-grandfather) married William Jackson. Their son Richard (Percy) Jackson married Florence (Dolly) Annie Hulley, his first cousin, the daughter of Ruben Hulley and Mary Ann Whittal (my great-grandparents). Well why so interesting one may ask? Well to add to this my father’s uncle Herbert Clayton Hulley also married his first cousin Martha Alice Hulley the daughter of Isaac Edgar Hulley and Alice Sarah Hancock. Isaac Edgar Hulley , half-brother of Ruben Hulley (my great-grandfather) was the son of Richard Brangan Hulley (my great-great-grandfather) and his second wife Caroline Dugmore. My grandmother Jane Maria Harden Hulley (wife of Emmanuel Joshua Bold - my grandfather) was the younger sister of Florence (Dolly) Annie Hulley and Herbert Clayton Hulley. My grandmother died when Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold (my father) was 5 years of age, my aunt Hazel (Eunice Hazel Bold) was around 3 years of age at the and my aunt Iris (Iris Una Bold) was around 2 years of age.

To take this one step further looking at my father’s name Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold, all famous names of the 1820 settlers:
· Whittal - My father’s mother was Jane Maria Harden Hulley the daughter of Ruben Hulley and Mary Ann Whittal. Mary Ann Whittal was the daughter of Francis Whittal and Ann Clayton (daughter of William Clayton and Judith Thorpe). Francis Whittal his land by purchasing other allotments on the location and by “standing his ground” during three Frontier Wars. He commanded the Burger Forces at Cuylerville when it was besieged in the 7th Frontier War of 1846, he was around 49 years of age at the time. The schoolhouse at Cuylerville (now St Mary's Anglican Church in Cuylerville) became a laager, known as Whittal’s Laager. The Lychgate at Cuylerville cemetery commemorates the defence of Cuylerville in 1851. During this attack, Whittle's homestead and haystacks on Pomeroy (Francis Whittal’s farm) were destroyed. Ann Whittal, (nee Clayton) unlike Elizabeth Salt has no commemoration plaque or memorial in Cuylerville, as per Elizabeth Salt’s memorial in Grahamstown. However, like Elizabeth Salt (also associated with the Bold family through marriage), during the disturbances of 1847, when the small community of Cuylerville was being besieged in their church-come-school building, Ann Whittal regularly crept out of their barricade every night to visit the abandoned homesteads to gather what she could, and bring it back to those who were fighting for their lives in the communal centre. Ann Whittal (my great-great-grandmother) was the mother of Mary Ann Whittal (my great-grandmother).

The Xhosa Wars (also known as the Cape Frontier Wars or "Africa's 100 Years War"), were a series of nine wars or flare-ups (from 1779 to 1879) between the Xhosa tribes and European settlers, in what is now the Eastern Cape in South Africa. These events were the longest-running military action in African colonialism history. The 7th Frontier War (1846-47), also known as the ‘War of the Axe’ or ‘Amatola War’. Governor Maitland imposed a new system of treaties on the Xhosa chiefs without consulting them. A severe drought forced desperate Xhosa to engage in cattle raids across the frontier in order to survive. In addition, Robert Godlonton continued to use his newspaper the Graham's Town Journal to agitate for Eastern Cape settlers to annexe and settle the land that had been returned to the Xhosa after the previous war. However the event that actually triggered war was when a Khoi (Dutch settlers labelled them Hottentots) escort was transporting a manacled Xhosa thief to Grahamstown to be tried for stealing an axe, when Xhosa raiders attacked and killed the Khoi escort. The Xhosa refused to surrender the murderer and war broke out in March 1846.

The regular British forces suffered initial setbacks; a British column sent to confront the Ngqika chief, Mgolombane Sandile, was temporarily delayed at the Amatola Mountains and the attacking Xhosa were able to capture the centre of the three mile long wagon train which was not being defended, carrying away the British officer's supply of wine and other supplies. The local Commandos were very much more effective in the rough and mountainous terrain, as they had extensive local knowledge.

Governor Maitland (General Sir Peregrine Maitland, GCB) was replaced by Rt. Hon. Lt-Gen Sir Henry Pottinger, 1st Baronet, GCB, PC, the uncle of Elizabeth Pottinger (my great-great-grandmother’s uncle). The British Government developed the idea based on an idea originally created by Lieutenant-General Sir Benjamin D'Urban, GCB, KCH, KCTS, FRS (an ex-Governor of the cape Colony) of creating a form of protectorate to be known as British Kaffraria, in which the Paramount Xhosa Chief and subordinate chiefs of the various Xhosa tribes and their people would acknowledge the Queen as their protector and would recognise their subordination in civil and military affairs to a British military commander. Earl Grey and Lord John Russell agreed to implement Sir Benjamin D'Urban's (Port Natal became known as Durban named after D’Urban) plans but in a modified form, the modified scheme was partly formulated by Sir Henry Pottinger, who had had extensive experience of the system concerning indirect rule in India. Sir Henry Pottinger himself was considered the ideal person to implement the new system because of his experience in India and because he was in Britain at the time, with no immediate assignment. He thus became the Governor of the Cape Colony and also demanded that he be known as "High Commissioner" in addition to that of "Governor", hence he became the 1st High Commissioner of Southern Africa. His intentions were not to remain in Africa because he actually preferred to return to India; therefore, his acceptance of the post was conditional dependent on the first available post in India.

Unfortunately Sir Henry Pottinger on taking up the position as Governor of the Cape Colony was not able to implement the new system. When he arrived at Cape Town in January 1847, he discovered that the war was still being waged and his task was therefore devoted to ending the conflict. A post in India came up as Governor of Madras and he took it after concluding the ‘War of the Axe’ (7th Frontier War). His successor Sir Harry Smith returned as Governor of the Cape Colony and with instructions to annex the territory between the Keiskamma and Kei Rivers, under the title British Kaffraria.

POMEROY has an interesting history as it very much associated with the Whittal family and so to Harden family. POMEROY Nature Reserve today comprises of three farms which date back to the 1820 settlers and which are referred to in the definitive account of BAILIE'S PARTY OF THE 1820 SETTLERS written by M D Nash. Francis Whittal (my great great-grandfather) owned Pomeroy. William Harden, born in 1794, Middlesex married Maria Darvill, born 1794, Middlesex, their children being:
o Jane Maria Harden (my great-great-grandmother) who married Richard Brangan Hulley; and
o Maria Harden.

After the death of William Harden, Maria Harden (nee Darvill) his widow (who was famous for her amazing story of tenacious survival) and a wealthy landowner of considerable property situated in the location of Pomeroy, married a William Fletcher and they had three children.

Horace Fletcher, a descendant of William Fletcher and Maria Harden married late in life to a widow, Mrs Francis of Port Alfred. In 1918 Mr Fletcher owned Henry Lloyd's allotment (Mount Wellington), Francis Whittal’s farm (Pomeroy) and he had also inherited Bellevue from his father. When Horace Fletcher died, the three properties (Mount Wellington , Bellevue and Pomeroy) passed through his will to his wife's adult children.

Boucher - my father’s uncle Harden Whittal Hulley married a Violet Boucher and my father’s grandfather John William Bold (my great-grandfather) was married to a Maria Elizabeth Boucher (my great-grandmother).

2015 06 Apr - ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FROM GORDON BOLD ABOUT HIS ANCESTORS

When my father (Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold) was around 14 years of age he would sit down with his grandfather (John William Bold) and scribed his grandfather’s memoirs, entitled ‘When Diamonds were used as Bullets’. It was 1933 and his grandfather at that time was pretty old and on his deathbed. When my great-grandfather (John William Bold) died apparently thousands attended his funeral and his unfinished memoirs written by my father was published in ‘The Matatiele Mail’, Thursday , September, 21st 1933. I was told by my father that it is often said and apparently also once mentioned in ‘The Matatiele Mail’ that he (my great-grandfather) built Matatiele. Below is a copy of what is written in the newspaper cutting as dictated by John William Bold (my great-grandfather) to his grandson Whittal Hulley Boucher Bold (my father), which has nothing really to do with the Hulley family, but thought you would enjoy reading it:

When Diamonds were used as Bullets
As told by the late Mr. J Bold

Mr J. Bold, who died recently, commenced to dictate the story of his adventurous career while lying on his deathbed. The story as set forth below ends most dramatically, for as he finished telling how he escaped the bullets of the natives, his end came.

The Zulu War in 1879 was my third campaign. We went through Uitrecht, over the Lunieburg and, when about half our troops were across the Intombi river it came down in flood with the result that one half of the troops were on the one side and the other half were camped on the opposite banks. At break of day the Zulus attached those troops on the opposite bank, while we on our side kept up a continuous fire on the Native hordes. However, our firing did not seem to disturb the attacking Zulus and the massacre continued. With the exception of one man the whole regiment of the 88th Dragoon Guards was wiped out.

Elated with victory the Zulus then decided to attack us on the other side of the river. As I have already said, the river was in flood and the current very strong. However, the Zulus were determined to attack and entering the water with shields and assegais held aloft they commenced their perilous crossing. Soon they were caught in the strong current and as they drifted down the river were shot by our men. Realising the hopelessness of their position those on the bank retired to safety.

When at last the river was passable we went over and buried our dead in one large grave.

That being finished we followed on the spoors of the Natives and formed a laager, which we named Kambula. Our guide was a Transvaaler named Joubert, who knew the country well. From here we pushed on towards Hlobane in Northern Natal where we were commanded to go on patrol under Colonel Buller. As we were crossing the Hlobane Mountains to our left we saw a small party of Zulus and immediately opened fire and eventually charged down upon them; they ran further up the mountainside and we followed them. When on top of the mountains we formed into skirmishing order, advancing rapidly. As luck would have it the men on both the right and left flanks looked down the side of the hill and shouted:

“Look at them Coming”.

And sure enough there were masses of the blacks coming up the hillside. We had been led into a trap by the small band of natives we had followed. Our forces were too small to withstand the attack of the savage hordes and our only escape was over the nose of the mountain. It was lucky for us that our men had seen the advancing natives; otherwise we must have all perished.

Soon the word was given by Colonel Buller: “Retire, men, retire.” We led our horses down the precipitous sides of the mountain. Capt. Wetherley, his son and Piet Uys with about one hundred men bore the brunt of the fighting and of those hundred brave men only seven reached safety. Those of us to the left kept up a continuous fire on the hordes of natives who appeared to take little notice of us despite the fact that they were being cut down by our fire. It was hot work and we had to be very careful not to be caught. Soon the Zulus began to concentrate upon finishing our small party and, seeing them from a left and right wing, it was quickly realised that it would be useless for us to try and withstand the attack Colonel Buller again gave the order: “Retire, men, retire.”

We raced away and the Zulus turned to the mountains and as we proceeded at a walk about 500 yards away one of the Zulus shouted: “Good-bye, white-man: we have had some of you to-day but tomorrow we will be coming back to stab you all and make breakfast of you.”

I asked Colonel Buller whether he had heard the kaffir shouting and he asked me what he had said. When I told him, he replied, “ we were lead into a trap today and if they come tomorrow they will not have it all their way.”

The following day they surrounded our camp just at a time when dinner was cooking. I might tell you that we did not eat dinner that day for no sooner had they surrounded us than the engagement commenced. They attacked furiously throughout the afternoon and only retired when darkness approached. Next morning the ground round our laager was strewn with dead and dying natives, many of them having dumplings in their hands, which we had cooked for our own dinner.

We were warned by our officers for fatigue duty to ride the dead Zulus from the vicinity of our camp. We did not like the job and grumbling among the men commenced who said, “the world is wide why cannot we rather shift camp instead of doing this dirty work?’ The officers replied: “Well men, you are right but we cannot help it because the Zulu army may still be watching us and attack us on the line of march. When we shift from here we cannot go forward but will have to return to Uitrecht to await reinforcements.”

The night before we shifted camp we were told to pack up early in the morning. About none o’clock I was walking through the laager visit one of my chums when, all at once, I heard the picket challenge: “Halt, who goes there?” I heard a reply : Frenchie.”

“Advance, Frenchie,” and I give the challenge sign.

“I’ve got no counter sign,” came the replying.

I heard the guard’s voice again say: “Advance Frenchie.”

Frenchie was taken to the picket tent and I ran to see who it was and, seeing that it was Frenchie. I sat down in front of the tent to hear what he had to say.

Frenchie’ Story

Frenchie said that he had been taken prisoner at the fight on the hill a few days previous and taken to Cetshwayo to be killed by him. When in front of Cetshwayo the Chief said that he did not want to kill white men anymore as he had already killed enough but that his brother, Abelime was desirous of killing white men. They tied Frenchie’s hands and told him that he must eat grass while some of the Zulu women amused themselves by pulling out his beard. Later, Cetshwayo sent him with two Zulu’s to Estcourt to his brother Abelime to be killed by him. The two Zulu warriors were well armed and after marching some distance they loosened Frenchie’s arms, which had been tied behind his back, so that he would be able to walk faster. They marched their prisoner towards Kambula camp from where they would turn to the right to Estcourt. When about six miles away one of the Zulus halted and put down his weapon and having said something to the other guard, went towards a mealie patch. The other guard then sat down close to Frenchie and putting down his weapon took out his snuff box and just as he was indulging himself Frenchie seized his gun and shot him. Frenchie then pointed the gun at the other Zulu who ran away. Carrying the arms of both the guards Frenchie made for the camp and arrived there as black as a kaffir and as naked as the day on which he was born. The following day we packed up and returned to Uitrecht were we stayed until such time as reinforcements arrived. We then advanced again into Zululand and formed a laager beyond the Kambula camp. The day following our arrival I was on horse guard and, looking towards Maritzburg I saw on top of a hill an heliograph and hastened back to camp to acquaint them with what I had seen. Our heliograph operator sent out the challenge: “Who are you?” and back came the reply “Newdigates’s column. Prince Imperial killed. Come and help find the body.”

Prince Imperial

We advanced in skirmishing order, expecting to be attacked at any moment. However, we reached our destination and found his body in a donga, quite naked with twenty-two assegai stabs in it. The body was put on a mule wagon and escorted by the Lancers into Dundee. We then set out for our laager but darkness falling went into a hollow in which tambukie grass grew and sat throughout the night holding the bridles of our horses. At daybreak we mounted and rode back to camp. Arriving there we were informed that at two o’clock next morning we were to strike camp and proceed to the place where we had found the body pf the Prince Imperial. On our arrival Newdigate’s column was attached to us and we continued our march towards Enyati hill where the Zulu Impis were awaiting us. We had to cross a sandy donga where we experienced some trouble with the wagons. At that time I was a wagon guard; each troop’s wagon had to be guarded by one of their men because people used to steal things from them. Some of the wagons in front had negotiated the donga and just as I got mine through I heard a shout just the other side of a small rise. Seeing people running in the direction whence the shouting came I thought it was another of those small wild bucks. My wagon was proceeding towards the place where the laager was to be formed and one of my chums was sent to see whether I had been able to get the wagon through the donga. He met me coming along with it. I was then leading my horse and he was walking by my side. Seeing some Swazis passing, carrying what I thought to be stumps of wood cut into pieces, which looked something like sugar-bush wood, I asked my chum where the kaffirs had got the chunks of wood from as there was no bush in the vicinity.

A Big Snake

He replied that it was the big snake they were carrying and I asked him of what big snake he was speaking. He replied: “The snake that had the ox by the nose.” I told him that as I was older than he it was not right for him to try and play the fool with me, to which he replied: “Don’t get cross with me; if you doubt my word call to that black kaffir and ask him to stop and then you will see that I am right.” I did so and sure enough it was a snake. It was the tail part that he was carrying and I asked him what he was going to do with it, to which he replied: “We are going to boil it and drink the soup and the fat we are going to rub on our bodies. Speaking in the native language, I said to him, “Go on you dirty thing.”

The following morning we continued our march towards Enyati hill, A and B, troop in front as advance guard with Colonel Buller and Capt. Prier. As we got into line with Enyati hill about a hundred Zulus jumped from the river and ran towards the hill. We did not know that actually the impis were awaiting for us on the face of the hill where they had taken up position behind stones. The hill like a half moon and the fleeing Zulus kept stopping and looking back at us . It was then that Colonel Buller gave the order to charge and as we chased them they ran past the face of the hill and turned towards a donga leading towards the hill. We then made a frontal attack up the hill, Capt. Prier being just in front of me and Colonel Buller on my right. When we got about 200 yards from the foot of the hill Capt. Prier said to Colonel Buller: “Shall I take them further in, sir?” I then said to Prier: “ Do you want the men to lead their horses, sir?” we then halted and Colonel Buller asked Capt. Prier what he had said. He replied as above and again I repeated my question. Before he had time to answer I observed three Zulus going along the hill and they stopped and looked at us. The Capt. Asked whether I had seen them to which I replied in the affirmative. Well, shoot them, he said and I took aim and fired and they disappeared behind a stone. No sooner had I fired than the whole face of the hill was a mass of smoke and bullets rained down on us Capt. Prier than gave word to dismount. We were lying on the plain where not even a stone was to be had to shelter your head. I did not mind the bullets winging over me but there were three bullets that were worrying me, dropping to my right and left and at last one struck straight in front of me and sent the dust flying over me. On my left I saw a man lying behind an ant heap and I jumped up and ran to him saying, “Lay that way.” He did not seem to care about doing it so I said, “ I will kick you.” With that he shifted a bit to the left and just as I was about to lay down a bullet touched my jacket. I threw myself down behind the ant heap. I had a black hat on my head and no sooner did I stick my head out with my gun to my shoulder than bullets came flying in my direction. I wanted to get those three natives who were sending bullets so perilously near my head; again I tried but before I could get in my shot bullets rained down close to me. The third time a bullet moved my hat so I removed it and threw it about a yard from me. It was then that I saw bullets striking around the hat and on looking round the right side of the ant heap I was able to see that it was three natives behind a stone that were causing me all the trouble. They were resting on their haunches on the stone and made a fine target. Taking careful aim I fired and all three disappeared behind the stone. I waited patiently for their reappearance and at last two of them came out and no sooner had they appeared than I fired and both dropped back. I then fired at any heads I could see popping out from behind the stones. Looking at my chum lying on my left I saw him put his gun on top of the ant heap and pull the trigger. I said to him, “What are you doing; you are shooting over the hilltop and wasting bullets.” With that he stopped shooting altogether. I kept blazing away and eventually got up and said to Capt. Priers: “What is the good of firing at smoke and stone. Some of our men are shooting over the hill.” With that I went across to him where he stood holding his horse and he asked me to hold his horse while he had a shot. I handed him my empty gun and a cartridge and just as he was about to load the gun a bullet whizzed between us. Dropping the cartridge he said, “Damn it; take your gun,” which I did and, picking up the cartridge.

My great-grandfather’s memoirs basically gives an account of the two other major defeats inflicted on the British by the Zulus, the Battle of Intombi Drift and the Battle of Hlobane plus the recovery of the Prince Imperial’s body, which followed the Battle of Isandlwana disaster (around 1500 British troops were killed , basically a whole battalion was wiped out). When my great-grandfather mentions, “The Zulu War in 1879 was my third campaign”, his first two campaigns were to do with the 9th Xhosa War (also known as the 9th Frontier war). Unfortunately, my great-grandfathers memoirs like my father’s memoirs, were unfinished.


325. Eunice Hazel Bold

1921 30 Jun - born

1941 26 Sep - married Bernard Arthur Lemmon

2017 07 Oct - died - information from John Powell


326. Iris Una Bold

1922 07 Nov - born

2009 08 Dec - died in Bloemfontein South Africa

2010 01 Jan - message from Daryll Allwright: Just to let you know Iris Una BOLD b 07/11/1922 d 08/12/2009 in
Bloemfontein South Africa daughter of Jane Maria Harden HULLEY and Joshua Emmanuel BOLD


114. Thomas Henry Hulley

Freemason Membership Register:
Lodge Initiation Passing Raising Surname Christian Age Residence
Date Name
Charles Warren Kimberley 1898-10-13 Nov. 10 Dec-22 Hulley Thomas Henry 40 Kimberley

Profession Certificate Year Remarks
Range
Engine Driver 09-03.99 1887-1909

See www.bilderberg.org <http://www.bilderberg.org> for explanation of Passing and Raising.

Freemason Membership Register:
Lodge Initiation Passing Raising Surname Christian Age Residence
Date Name
Charles Warren Kimberley 1898-00-00 Hulley Thomas Henry

Profession Certificate Year Remarks
Range
1910-1921

1899-1902 - Anglo-Boer War records Transcription:-
First Name T.
Last Name Hulley
Service No.
Rank Lieutenant
Regiment Kimberley Town Guard
Notes
Rolls Roll: 282

1903-1904 - Depot: TAB Source: CJC Type: Leer Vol. no: 172 System: 01 Ref: CJC607 Part 1
Description: CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION BRITISH SUBJECTS ORANGE FREE STATES. KIMBERLEY.
THOMAS HENRY HULLEY

1904 - DEPOT: VAB SOURCE: CO TYPE: LEER VOLUME_NO 275; SYSTEM 01 EFERENCE 2487/04 PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: T HULLEY: PERMIT TO IMPORT 100 ROUNDS SHOT CARTRIDGES ISSUED TO.

1904 - DEPOT: VAB SOURCE: CO TYPE: LEER VOLUME_NO 318; SYSTEM 01; REF 6162/04 PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: T HULLEY: PERMIT TO IMPORT 100 SHOT CARTRIDGES, ISSUED TO.

1909 - Depot: TAB Source: LD Type: Leer Vol. no: 1775 System: 01 Ref: AG2386/09 Part 1
Description: APPLICATION FOR ASSISTANCE TO PATENT HIS INVENTION THOS HULLEY.

1918 - Depot: TAB Source: MHG Type: Leer Vol. no: 0 System: 01 Ref: H2043 Part 1
Description: HULLEY, THOMAS HENRY.


327. Marmaduke Thomas Hulley

1886 06 May - born at Kimberley - from Kimberley parish register.

1886 04 Jul - baptised at Kimberley parish church:
When baptised: 1886 July 4
Christian Name: Marmaduke Thomas
Declared Day of Birth: 1886 6 May
Parent's Name
Christian: Thomas Mary & Sarah
Surname: Hulley
Abode: Kimberley
Quality, Trade or Profession: Overseer
Sponsors or Witnesses: John Pratley & the Parents
Ceremony performed by: Albert V. Lyttleton priest in charge


328. Ada Mary Hulley

1887 14 May - born at Kimberley - from Kimberley parish register.

1887 19 Jun - baptised at Kimberley parish church:
When baptised: 1887 June 19
Christian Name: Ada Mary
Declared Day of Birth: 1887 May 14
Parent's Name
Christian: Thomas Mary & Sarah
Surname: Hulley
Abode: W. End Kimberley
Quality, Trade or Profession: Engine Driver
Sponsors or Witnesses: George Pratley Annie Barnes Martha Pratley
Ceremony performed by: Albert V. Lyttleton priest


329. Maude Gertrude Hulley

1889 28 Feb - born at Kimberley - from Kimberley parish register.

1889 24 Mar - baptised at Kimberley parish church:
When baptised: 1889 Mar 24
Christian Name: Maude Gertrude
Declared Day of Birth: 1889 Feb 28
Parent's Name
Christian: Thomas Mary & Sarah
Surname: Hulley
Abode: West End
Quality, Trade or Profession: Engine Driver
Sponsors or Witnesses: John Pratley Lucy Isabella Bartlett Lynda Mary Gates
Ceremony performed by: Albert V. Lyttleton priest


330. Lillian Sarah Hulley

1890 28 Sep - born at Kimberley - from Kimberley parish register.

1890 31 Aug - baptised at Kimberley parish church:
When baptised: 1890 Aug 31
Christian Name: Lillian Sarah
Declared Day of Birth: 1890 Sep 28
Parent's Name
Christian: Thomas Mary & Sarah
Surname: Hulley
Abode: West End
Quality, Trade or Profession: Engine Driver
Sponsors or Witnesses: Thomas Pratley Emily Barnes Susan Amelia Bishop
Ceremony performed by: Albert V. Lyttleton


331. Evelyn Blanch Hulley

1892 12 Feb - born at Kimberley - from Kimberley parish register.

1892 16 Mar - baptised at Kimberley parish church:
When baptised: 1892 Mar 16
Christian Name: Evelyn Blanch
Declared Day of Birth: Feb 12 1892
Parent's Name
Christian: Thomas Mary & Sarah
Surname: Hulley
Abode: West End Kimberley
Quality, Trade or Profession: Engine Driver
Sponsors or Witnesses: Alice Maria Francis Jane Pratley & The Parents
Ceremony performed by: John W. Stevens


333. Victor Harold Hulley

1886 06 May - born at Kimberley - from Kimberley parish register.

1886 04 Jul - baptised at Kimberley parish church:
When baptised: 1896 Mar 22
Christian Name: Victor Harold
Declared Day of Birth: Feb 7 1896
Parent's Name
Christian: Thomas Mary & Sarah
Surname: Hulley
Abode: West End
Quality, Trade or Profession: Engine Driver
Sponsors or Witnesses: Mary Barnes Annie Barnes
Ceremony performed by: D. A. Holbeck ..........?

1917 - Depot: KAB Source: MOK Type: Leer Vol. no: 1/1/286 System: 02 Ref: R7/145 Part 1
Description: HULLEY, VICTOR HAROLD. DECEASED ESTATE PAPERS.


334. Thomas Henry Hulley

1897 18 Nov - born at Kimberley - from Kimberley parish register.

1897 19 Dec - baptised at Kimberley parish church:
When baptised: 1897 Dec 19
Christian Name: Thomas Henry
Declared Day of Birth: Nov 18 1897
Parent's Name
Christian: Thomas Mary & Sarah
Surname: Hulley
Abode: Parson's Lane Kimberley
Quality, Trade or Profession: Engine Driver
Sponsors or Witnesses: Thomas Pratley Thos. Henry Hulley Susan Pratley
Ceremony performed by: Alfred J. Hutton Vicar


335. Dorothy Pratley Hulley

1901 16 Jun - born at Kimberley - from Kimberley parish register.

1901 21 Jul - baptised at Kimberley parish church:
When baptised: 1901 Jul 21
Christian Name: Dorothy Pratley
Declared Day of Birth: Jun 16 1901
Parent's Name
Christian: Thomas Mary & Sarah
Surname: Hulley
Abode: 2 Parsons Lane Kimberley
Quality, Trade or Profession: Engine Driver
Sponsors or Witnesses: Annie Barnes Fanny E. Pratley John W. Marriott
Ceremony performed by: Alfred J. Hutton Vicar

1990 01 Jul - died - see Memorial tablet below.
Memorial Tablet
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
DOROTHY PRATLEY HULLEY
JUNE 16TH 1901 - JULY 1ST 1990
REST IN PEACE GOOD AND FAITHFUL
CHILD OF YOUR FATHER


124. Francis Walter Hulley

1882 14 Mar - born at Cromwell Farm, Umzimkulu (Ixopo) District, Colony of Natal.

1907 - Depot: KAB Source: DOC Type: Leer Vol. no: 4/1/1263 System: 01 Ref: 2675 Part 1
Description: MORTGAGE BOND. FRANCIS WALTER HULLEY.

1951 28 Nov - died at Bremersdoorp, Manzini, Swaziland.

2003 Aug - Information from Frank Kennedy Hulley
Francis Walter Hulley married Lousia Johanna Emilla Botha, who was the niece of
Louis Botha, who commanded the Boer forces who laid siege to Ladysmith in
1899/1900. Francis was serving as a 17 yaer trooper in the Natal militia mounted
infantry regiment of the Border Mounted Rifles, inside Ladysmith fighting against the
Boers.
In 1906, after the Boer War and prior to his marriage, he also served in the volunteer
regiment known as Royston's Horse, raised by Captain Jack Royston, his old
company commander in Ladysmith, consisting almost entirely of old BMR veterans,
that took the field alongside the Government militia regiments to put down the
uprising led by the rebel Zulu chief, Bambata, which became known as the Bambata
Rebellion or Zulu Rebellion. This campaign was recognised by the old Natal Colonial
government by the striking of a special military medal, of which only 7000 were struck,
and Francis Walter Hulley was one of the recipients of it.

(see also notes for Louisa Johanna Emilla Botha)

1951 28 Nov - died and buried in the family plot at Malkerns in Manzini (formerly Bremersdorp).
Information from Frank K. Hulley.

2008 Apr - Note from John Powell - Known as 'Black Frank'.

2012 02 Jan - note by John Powell:
Married first, Louisa Johanna Emelia BOTHA, 27 Jun 1907, Cedarville, East
Griqualand, Cape Colony. 3 children.
Married second, Hilary Evelyn FREDERICKSON, 14 Feb 1918, Kokstad, East
Griqualand, Cape Province, Union of South Africa. 3 children.


Louisa Johanna Emilia Botha

1913 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE MSCE; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO 0; SYSTEM 01; REFERENCE 50/232 PART 1.
DESCRIPTION:HULLEY, LOUISA JOHANNA EMELIN.

1913 - Depot: KAB Source MOOC Type: Leer Vol. no: 6/9/727 System: 01 Ref: 2815 Part 1
Description: HULLEY, LOUISA JOHANNA EMILIA. NEE BOTHA. DEATH NOTICE

1913-1914 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE MSCE; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO 0; SYSTEM 01; REFERENCE 50/232; PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: HULLEY, LOUISA JOHANNA EMELIN.

1916 - Depot: KAB Source MOOC Type: Leer Vol. no: 13/1/2522 System: 01 Ref: 21 Part 1
Description: HULLEY, LOUISA JOHANNA EMILIA. BORN BOTHA. LIQUIDATION AND DISTRIBUTION
ACCOUNT. FIRST ACCOUNT

2003 xx Aug - Information from Frank Kennedy Hulley:
Louisa Johanna Emilla Botha was the niece of Louis Botha, the former Boer general, who in 1910 became
the first prime minister of the Union of South Africa. During the famous siege of Ladysmith he had
commanded the Boer forces who were laying the siege.
(see also notes for Frank Kennedy Hulley)


Edwin Alaric Travers

2008 Apr - Note by John Powell: EA Travers - Deceased Estates, Master of the Supreme Court, Pietermaritzburg - 5784/89. Ref all Nora Alice Amelia Travers nee Hulley plus Joyce Maud Neville-Smyly nee Travers (eldest daughter) simultaneously interviewed by F. John W. Powell in Durban 1985.


Hilary Evelyn Frederickson

1890 7 Apr - born at mngazi River, Transvaal. Note by John Powell: 19km inland from Port St Johns.


128. Isaac Edgar Hulley

1890 06 Jul - born at Vaalfontein Farm, Swartberg, East Griqualand, Cape Colony.

1914 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE RSC; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO 1/5/288; SYSTEM 01; REFERENCE 55/1914;
PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: ILLIQUID CASE. STEEL MURRAY AND COMPANY VERSUS ISAAC EDGAR HULLEY.
REMARKS: I55/14.

1914 - Depot: KAB Source: CSC Type: Leer Vol. no: 2/6/1/475 System: 01 Ref: 559 Part 1
Description: MOTION. OPPOSED APPLICATION. STEEL MURRAY AND CO. VERSUS ISAAC EDGAR
HULLEY. WRIT.

1914-1918 War - Enlisted in S.A. Imperial Forces as a volunteer and saw active service in France.
Information from Frank Hulley, New Zealand.

1945 19 Dec - died at Durban, Natal.

2008 Apr - note by John Powell: Ref Death Notice dated 04 Mar 1946. It is unusual for a death
notice to be completed more than a year after a person's death, but as I have personally
inspected the DE file, I would argue that my records are as documented.

2012 02 Jan - note by John Powell:
Married firstly, Ethel Constance FREDERICKSON, at Greytown, Natal, 5 children.
Married second, Eillen Mary JOYNER, Greytown, Natal, 4 children.
Natal Archives, Pietermaritzburg: Deceased Estate MSCE 456/46. Death Notice dated 4
Mar 1946.

1918 - Depot: KAB Source: CSC Type: Leer Vol. no: 2/6/1/550 System: 01 Ref: 303 Part 1
Description: MOTION. EX Parte APPLICATION OF ISAAC EDGAR HULLEY. LEAVE TO SELL.


Ethel Constance Frederickson

2008 Apr - Note by John Powell: Ethel Constance Hulley nee Frederickson married as her second
husband Ernest Cecil Douglas Stow. He died in 1962, leaving her as his surviving spouse.
(Ref GA PMB (MSCE 1542/1962)


130. Henrietta Hulley

Father spells Henriette in at least 2 documents; other legal documents, spelt Henrietta She signs
Henrietta.

1879/80 (Birth not traced) presumed Wash Bank farm, Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony. chr. not traced.

1903 28 Dec - married at Ben Lomond (farm) Homestead, Indawana District, Griqualand East, Cape Colony
(Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony); Rev. Sydney N BISHOP (Anglican Minister); Entry #53; Witnesses:
EF HOUSTON-MACMILLAN (sic), MA HULLEY[doc] [FamilySearch: Esikeni Mission Register, Anglican;
img. 14]. Spouse - Henry Archie HOUSTON McMILLAN[doc]aka Harry; Archibald; HOUSTON son of
John Solomon HOUSTON and Dorothea (Dorothy, Dora) FYNN.

Notes for Marriage:
A. m1. Esikeni, St Gregory, Marriage Register, FamilySearch; image 14: Groom: Harry Archie
HOUSTON McMILLAN, 25 years, bachelor, Farmer, of Dronk Vlei (Creighton), Ixopo, Colony of Natal,
son of John Solomon HOUSTON McMILLAN, Farmer; Bride: Henrietta HULLEY, 21 years, spinster, of
Ben Lomond farm, Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony, daughter of Henry Brangan HULLEY, Farmer; by
Licence; 28 Dec 1903, Ben Lomond (farm) Homestead, Indawana District, Griqualand East, Cape
Colony (Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony); Rev. Sydney N BISHOP (Anglican Minister); Entry #53;
Witnesses: EF HOUSTON-MACMILLAN (sic), MA HULLEY[doc]

No date - dau Caroline born

No date - dau Eleanor born

1907 12 Apr - dau Daisy Ann born at Kokstad; East Griqualand, Cape Colony.

1908 16 Dec - dau Alice Edith Houston born - daughter of Henry Archie and Henrietta, of Inkonzo (?Inconza farm; #
5770), Creighton (aka Dronk Vlei) District, Colony of Natal, Father’s occupation= Farmer.

1909 11 Apr - christened at the Esikeni Mission (Anglican), Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony; Rev. SN BISHOP; Entry #
1059; Witnesses: The Parents, Frances Mary Ann (properly Marion) HULLEY[doc].

No date - dau Lucy born

remarriage. certificate issued Rhodesia 28 Mar 1919; see l/h page DN HAH; obviously not used


1963 24 Jan - (D/R = 84y) died at Bulawayo Central Hospital, Bulawayo, Rhodesia. Residence: 5 Jambrah Court, 1st
Avenue/Main Street, Bulawayo[doc] D/R: Entry #255/63, Bulawayo, 1963; signed by Hospital Official;
5 children[doc] DN: not found.

(no date) - buried at Bulawayo Cemetery[doc]


Henry Archie Houston McMillan

1878 02 Sep - born at Alfred County, Colony of Natal: Henry Archie HOUSTON McMILLAN[doc] aka Harry; Archibald;
HOUSTON son of John Solomon HOUSTON and Dorothea (Dorothy, Dora) FYNN Farmer.

1885 xx Apr - christened at Esikeni Mission, Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony; Rev. EY DIXON; Entry #108; Witnesses:
James CROSBY, Arthur RUDD, Eliza Jane FINN (FYNN), Adeliza Hephzibah (RUDD); Note: Christened
Henry HOUSTON; parents’ abode= Esikeni[doc].

1903 28 Dec - married at Ben Lomond (farm) Homestead, Indawana District, Griqualand East, Cape Colony
(Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony); Rev. Sydney N BISHOP (Anglican Minister); Entry #53; Witnesses:
EF HOUSTON-MACMILLAN (sic), MA HULLEY[doc] [FamilySearch: Esikeni Mission Register, Anglican;
img. 14]. Spouse - Henry Archie HOUSTON McMILLAN[doc]aka Harry; Archibald; HOUSTON son of
John Solomon HOUSTON and Dorothea (Dorothy, Dora) FYNN.

Notes for Marriage:
A. m1. Esikeni, St Gregory, Marriage Register, FamilySearch; image 14: Groom: Harry Archie
HOUSTON McMILLAN, 25 years, bachelor, Farmer, of Dronk Vlei (Creighton), Ixopo, Colony of Natal,
son of John Solomon HOUSTON McMILLAN, Farmer; Bride: Henrietta HULLEY, 21 years, spinster, of
Ben Lomond farm, Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony, daughter of Henry Brangan HULLEY, Farmer; by
Licence; 28 Dec 1903, Ben Lomond (farm) Homestead, Indawana District, Griqualand East, Cape
Colony (Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony); Rev. Sydney N BISHOP (Anglican Minister); Entry #53;
Witnesses: EF HOUSTON-MACMILLAN (sic), MA HULLEY[doc]

No date - dau Caroline born

No date - dau Eleanor born

1907 12 Apr - dau Daisy Ann born at Kokstad; East Griqualand, Cape Colony.

1908 16 Dec - dau Alice Edith Houston born - daughter of Henry Archie and Henrietta, of Inkonzo (?Inconza farm; #
5770), Creighton (aka Dronk Vlei) District, Colony of Natal, Father’s occupation= Farmer.

1909 11 Apr - christened at the Esikeni Mission (Anglican), Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony; Rev. SN BISHOP; Entry #
1059; Witnesses: The Parents, Frances Mary Ann (properly Marion) HULLEY[doc].

No date - dau Lucy born.

1912 17 Oct - died at The Vale farm, Abercorn District, Southern Rhodesia[doc] Residence: The Vale (farm), Abercorn
District, Southern Rhodesia[doc] D/R: Entry #181, Salisbury; 5 children; signed by GN HOUSTON,
Farmer, brother (of deceased), of Wild Dog Valley, Kimberley Reefs; 18 Oct 1912[doc] DN: signed by
Henrietta HOUSTON, widow of deceased, at The Vale (farm), 31 Oct 1912[doc] (blackwater fever).


354. Daisy Ann Houston

1907 12 Apr - born at Kokstad; East Griqualand, Cape Colony.

- m. Wilfred Charles ROSE (aka SCOTT), b. Aug 1907, Johannesburg, son of Walter ROSE (formerly SCOTT)
and Winifred Madeline DENYER; 4 children.


355. Alice Edith Houston McMillan

1908 16 Dec - born - daughter of Henry Archie and Henrietta, of Inkonzo (?Inconza farm; #5770), Creighton (aka Dronk
Vlei) District, Colony of Natal, Father’s occupation= Farmer.

1909 11 Apr - christened at the Esikeni Mission (Anglican), Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony; Rev. SN BISHOP; Entry #
1059; Witnesses: The Parents, Frances Mary Ann (properly Marion) HULLEY[doc].

(undated) - married James (Jimmy) SMITH.


131. Henry Herbert Hulley

1884 03 Feb - born at Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony.

1903 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE SGO; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO III/1/165; SYSTEM 01; REFERENCE
SG2410/1903; PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: HH HULLEY ENQUIRES WHETHER THERE WILL BE ANY CHANCE OF
PURCHASING LAND IN DRONK VLEI.

1905 18 Jan - married at Magistrate’s Court, Kokstad, East Griqualand, Cape Colony; ?AW ?SWINFULL, Resident
Magistrate: Entry #16; by Special Licence; Witnesses: Fred S BERNING, H Hinton CATHERINE; Groom:
bachelor, Farmer, 20 years, of Ben Lomond farm, Umzimkulu District, with Father’s Consent; Bride:
spinster, 21 years, of Ben Lomond farm[doc]; Cape Civil Marriages: 613/1905; (DN=) Kokstad, Mount
Currie District, East Griqualand, Cape Colony[doc]

1905 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE MJPW; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO 122; SYSTEM 02; REFERENCE
MPW2354/1905; PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: HH HULLY, POLELA, COMPLAINS THAT THE CAPE GOVERNMENT IS CLOSING, FOR
TRAFFIC AND REMOVAL OF STOCK, TWO GATES ON J VAN WHYE'S AND TONNESON'S FARM
NEAR THE BASUTO BORDER. REMARKS: PWD5695/1905.

1905 - Depot: KAB Source: CSC Type: Leer Vol. no: 2/6/1/261 System: 01 Ref: 177 Part 1
Description: MOTION. PETITION OF DANIEL FERDINAND BOSMAN IN RE REGISTRATION OF ANTE
NUPTIAL CONTRACT BETWEEN HERBERT HENRY HULLEY AND LOUISA JANE ADA HOUSTON.

1907 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE SGO; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO III/1/220; SYSTEM 01; REFERENCE
SG1254/1907; PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: HH HULLY, EAST GRIQUALAND: WANTS INFORMATION ON CROWN LANDS ON THE
SLOPES OF THE DRAKENSBERG, REGARDING TERMS, GRAZING.

1907 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE SGO; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO III/1/222; SYSTEM 01; REFERENCE
SG1794/1907; PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: HH HULLEY, EAST GRIQUALAND: REQUESTS INFORMATION REGARDING THE
BOUNDARY BETWEEN BASUTOLAND AND NATAL, AND ALSO ABOUT THE CONDITIONS THE
BERG LAND WILL BE SOLD AT.

1907-1908 - DEPOT NAB; SOURCE SGO; TYPE LEER; VOLUME_NO III/1/228; SYSTEM 01; REFERENCE
SG4098/1907; PART 1.
DESCRIPTION: HH HULLY, EAST GRIQUALAND: LAND. REMARKS: AGR7081/1907.

1936 24 Aug - died at Klipheuval (sic) Farm, Charter District, Southern Rhodesia [doc] Residence: Klipheuval (sic)
Farm, Charter District, Southern Rhodesia [doc] D/R: Entry #10, Charter; signed by Louisa Jane
HULLEY, wife of deceased, of Klipheuval (sic) farm[doc] DN: signed by Louisa Jane HULLEY, surviving
spouse, at Klipheuval (sic) farm, 7 Sep 1936 [doc] bd. Klipheuval (sic) farm Cemetery, Charter District
[doc]
NOTE: Klipheuval, as above written; elsewhere most often spelt Klipheuwel.


Louisa Jane Ada Houston

1883 1 Dec - born at Umzimkulu, Cape Colony daughter of John Solomon HOUSTON and Dorothea FYNN.

1885 xx Apr - christened at Esikeni Mission, Umzimkulu District, Cape Colony; Rev. EY DIXON; Entry #111; Witnesses:
James CROSBY, Arthur RUDD, Eliza Jane FINN (FYNN), Adeliza Hephzibah (RUDD) [doc].

1969 02 Sep - died at C&A Hospital, Gatooma, Rhodesia [doc]. D/R: Entry #341/69,1969; signed by Hospital Official [doc].

- buried at Gatooma Cemetery.


357. Olive Ann Hulley

1904 19 Apr - born at Crystal Waters farm, Underberg, Colony of Natal.

No date - married Colin Douglas. (no trace ZIM & ZA).


361. Doris Grace Hulley

1915 29 Jan - born at Enkeldoorn, Southern Rhodesia.

No date - married Johannes Jacobus Fourie.

1976 01 Jul - died at the Andrew Fleming Hospital, Salisbury, Rhodesia [doc].

No date - buried at Warren Hills Cemetery [doc].


367. John Richard Hulley

1928 18 Feb - born at Enkeldoorn, Southern Rhodesia.

1937 05 Nov - died at Pennyfeather (aka Pennyfather, formerly Kudushoek) farm, Charter District, Southern Rhodesia.
D/R: Entry #8, Charter, 1937; signed by EC Hulley, brother of deceased, Pennyfeather farm, Charter
District, 8 Nov 1937[doc]; ZIM DN ref LW 3888; note: most likely correctly Pennefather farm, after Col.
Pennefather..


TopTop of Page
Copyright © 2000-2018 Ray Hulley. All rights reserved.